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HomeMy WebLinkAbout11-03-21 Board Packet OTAY WATER DISTRICT AND OTAY WATER DISTRICT FINANCING AUTHORITY BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING BY TELECONFERENCE 2554 SWEETWATER SPRINGS BOULEVARD SPRING VALLEY, CALIFORNIA WEDNESDAY November 3, 2021 3:30 P.M. AGENDA 1. ROLL CALL 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 3. APPROVAL OF AGENDA 4. APPROVE THE MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF OCTOBER 6, 2021 5. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION – OPPORTUNITY FOR MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC TO SPEAK TO THE BOARD ON ANY SUBJECT MATTER WITHIN THE BOARD'S JURISDICTION IN- CLUDING AN ITEM ON TODAY'S AGENDA Additionally, members of the public may submit their comments on agendized and non- agendized items by either of the following two methods: a) If you wish to provide public comment directly - that is, live during the “Public Partici- pation” portion of the meeting - please complete and submit a Request to Speak Form via email to BoardSecretary@otaywater.gov before the start of the meet- ing. Your request to speak will be acknowledged during the “Public Participation” portion of the meeting when the Board will hear your comment. When called to speak, please state your Name and the City in which you reside. You will be pro- vided three minutes to speak. The Board is not permitted to enter into a dialogue with the speaker during this time. OR b) If you wish to have your comment read to the Board during the “Public Participation” portion of the meeting, please email your comment to BoardSecretary@otay- water.gov at least thirty minutes prior to the start of the meeting, and it will be read aloud during the “Public Participation” portion of the meeting. Please provide your Name and the City in which you reside, with your comment. Your comment must not take more than three minutes to read. The Board is not permitted to respond to writ- ten public comment during this time. The District’s meeting is live streamed. Information on how to watch and listen to the Dis- trict’s meeting can be found at this link: https://otaywater.gov/board-of-directors/agenda- and-minutes/board-agenda/ CONSENT CALENDAR 6. ITEMS TO BE ACTED UPON WITHOUT DISCUSSION, UNLESS A REQUEST IS MADE BY A MEMBER OF THE BOARD OR THE PUBLIC TO DISCUSS A PARTICU- LAR ITEM: a) APPROVE THE ADOPTION OF A MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION FOR THE COTTONWOOD SEWER LIFT STATION REPLACEMENT PROJECT (S2069) b) AWARD OF A CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT TO ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL SERVICES, INC. FOR THE 458-1 RESERVOIR INTERIOR/EXTERIOR COATING & UPGRADES PROJECT (P2593) IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $774,169.00 c) AUTHORIZE THE PURCHASE OF (6) SIX FLEET VEHICLES WITH A TOTAL COST OF $203,443.97 d) AUTHORIZE A TWO-YEAR FIXED AGREEMENT AND (3) THREE ONE-YEAR OPTIONS WITH NATURESCAPE SERVICES, INC. FOR LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $617,724.00 ACTION ITEMS 7. BOARD a) AUTHORIZE STAFF TO CONDUCT REMOTE TELECONFERENCE MEETINGS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS, INCLUDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS, PUR- SUANT TO RESOLUTION NO. 4401 WHICH THE BOARD ADOPTED AT A SPE- CIAL BOARD MEETING ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2021, AND IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF GOVERNMENT CODE § 54953(e) FOR THE NEXT 30 DAYS BECAUSE (1) A STATE OF EMERGENCY RELATED TO COVID-19 IS CURRENTLY IN EFFECT; (2) LOCAL OFFICIALS IN SAN DIEGO COUNTY HAVE IMPOSED OR RECOMMENDED MEASURES TO PROMOTE SOCIAL DISTANCING IN CONNECTION WITH COVID-19; AND (3) DUE TO THE COVID- 19 EMERGENCY, MEETING IN PERSON WOULD PRESENT IMMINENT RISKS TO THE HEALTH AND SAFETY OF ATTENDEES (MARTINEZ) b) DISCUSS THE 2021 AND 2022 BOARD MEETING CALENDARS (RAMOS- KROGMAN) 8. FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION a) AUTHORIZE A TWO-YEAR FIXED AGREEMENT, PLUS (3) THREE ONE-YEAR OPTIONS WITH AZTEC JANITORIAL SERVICES, FOR JANITORIAL SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $525,181.20 (PAYNE) b) ADOPT RESOLUTION NO. 4402 REQUIRED FOR A GRANT FUNDING APPLI- CATION SUBMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES BUREAU OF RECLAMATION’S WATERSMART: WATER AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY GRANT FUNDING PRO- GRAM FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022 (CAREY / COBURN-BOYD) c) APPROVE THE AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 (DYCHITAN) REPORTS 9. GENERAL MANAGER’S REPORT 10. SAN DIEGO COUNTY WATER AUTHORITY UPDATE 11. DIRECTORS' REPORTS/REQUESTS 12. PRESIDENT’S REPORT/REQUESTS RECESS TO CLOSED SESSION 13. CLOSED SESSION a) DISCUSSION RELATING TO CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) AND PUBLIC SER- VICES [GOVERNMENT CODE §54957] b) CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS pursuant to California Government Code section 54956.8 Property: SALT CREEK GOLF COURSE 525 HUNTE PARKWAY CHULA VISTA, CA 91914 Agency negotiator: General Counsel Under negotiation: Disposition of Property c) CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL – EXISTING LITIGATION [GOVERN- MENT CODE §54956.9] OTAY WATER DISTRICT vs. CITY OF SAN DIEGO; CASE NO. 37-2017- 00019348-CU-WM-CTL d) CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL – EXISTING LITIGATION [GOVERN- MENT CODE §54956.9] MARK COZIAHR, ET AL. vs. OTAY WATER DISTRICT, CASE NO. 37-2015- 000-CU-MC-CTL e) CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL – EXISTING LITIGATION (§ 54956.9) NAME OF CLAIMANT: THARSOS, INC. f) CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL – EXISTING LITIGATION (§ 54956.9) NAME OF CLAIMANT: WEIR CONSTRUCTION RETURN TO OPEN SESSION 14. REPORT ON ANY ACTIONS TAKEN IN CLOSED SESSION. THE BOARD MAY ALSO TAKE ACTION ON ANY ITEMS POSTED IN CLOSED SESSION. OTAY WATER DISTRICT FINANCING AUTHORITY 15. NO MATTERS TO DISCUSS 16. ADJOURNMENT All items appearing on this agenda, whether or not expressly listed for action, may be deliber- ated and may be subject to action by the Board. The Agenda, and any attachments containing written information, are available at the District’s website at www.otaywater.gov. Written changes to any items to be considered at the open meeting, or to any attachments, will be posted on the District’s website. Copies of the Agenda and all attachments are also available by contacting the District Secretary at (619) 670-2253. If you have any disability which would require accommodation in order to enable you to partici- pate in this meeting, please call the District Secretary at (619) 670-2253 at least 24 hours prior to the meeting. Certification of Posting I certify that on October 29, 2021, I posted a copy of the foregoing agenda near the regu- lar meeting place of the Board of Directors of Otay Water District, said time being at least 72 hours in advance of the regular meeting of the Board of Directors (Government Code Section §54954.2). Executed at Spring Valley, California on October 29, 2021. /s/ Tita Ramos-Krogman, District Secretary 1 MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETINGS OF THE OTAY WATER DISTRICT AND OTAY WATER DISTRICT FINANCING AUTHORITY October 6, 2021 1.The meeting was called to order by President Smith at 3:32 p.m. 2.ROLL CALL Directors Present: Croucher, Keyes, Lopez, Robak and Smith Staff Present: General Manager Jose Martinez, General Counsel Dan Shinoff, General Counsel Jeanne Blumenfeld, Chief of Engineering Rod Posada, Chief Financial Officer Joe Beachem, Chief of Administration Adolfo Segura, Chief of Operations Andrew Jackson, Asst. Chief of Finance Kevin Koeppen, District Secretary Tita Ramos-Krogman and others per attached list. 3.PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Chief of Administrative Services Adolfo Segura led the pledge of allegiance. 4.APPROVAL OF AGENDA A motion was made by Director Croucher, seconded by Director Lopez, and carried with the following vote: Ayes: Directors Croucher, Keyes, Lopez, Robak and Smith Noes: None Abstain: None Absent: None to approve the agenda. 5.APPROVE THE MINUTES OF THE REGULAR BOARD MEETING OF SEPTEMBER 1, 2021 AND THE MINUTES OF THE SPECIAL BOARD MEETINGOF SEPTEMBER 27, 2021 A motion was made by Director Croucher, seconded by Director Lopez, and carried with the following vote: Ayes: Directors Croucher, Keyes, Lopez, Robak and Smith Noes: None Abstain: None Absent: None AGENDA ITEM 4 2 to approve the minutes of the regular board meeting of September 1, 2021, and the minutes of the special board meeting of September 27, 2021. 6. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION – OPPORTUNITY FOR MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC TO SPEAK TO THE BOARD ON ANY SUBJECT MATTER WITHIN THE BOARD'S JURISDICTION BUT NOT AN ITEM ON TODAY'S AGENDA No one wished to be heard. CONSENT ITEMS 7. ITEMS TO BE ACTED UPON WITHOUT DISCUSSION, UNLESS A REQUEST IS MADE BY A MEMBER OF THE BOARD OR THE PUBLIC TO DISCUSS A PARTICULAR ITEM: A motion was made by Director Robak, seconded by Director Lopez and carried with the following vote: Ayes: Directors Croucher, Keyes, Lopez, Robak and Smith Noes: None Abstain: None Absent: None to approve the following consent calendar items: a) AWARD A CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT TO JENNETTE COMPANY, INC. FOR THE 1200 PRESSURE ZONE IMPROVEMENTS – PHASE II PROJECT IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $296,990.00 b) APPROVAL OF FINAL CONTRACT CHANGE ORDER NO. 10 IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED A REDUCTION OF ($127,413.00) TO THE CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT WITH PACIFIC HYDROTECH CORPORATION FOR THE 870-2 PUMP STATION REPLACEMENT PROJECT ACTION ITEMS 8. BOARD a) DISCUSS THE 2021 BOARD MEETING CALENDAR There were no changes to the board meeting calendar. INFORMATIONAL ITEMS 9. ANNUAL DIRECTOR’S EXPENSE REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021 The board waived staff’s presentation as it was made clear that the overall directors’ expenses were 30% lower than the prior fiscal year. 3 10. 2021 LEGISLATIVE SESSION UPDATE Communications Officer Tenille Otero provided an update of the end of the 2021 legislative session. Ms. Gianna Setoudeh, Policy Advisor for Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, provided a PowerPoint presentation to the board. Staff responded to questions and concerns from the board. 11. SOCIAL MEDIA, MOBILE APPLICATION, AND WEBSITE ANALYTICS UPDATE Communications Assistant Eileen Salmeron provided a PowerPoint presentation to the board. Staff responded to questions and comments from the board. 12. FISCAL YEAR 2021 YEAR-END REPORT ON THE DISTRICT’S FISCAL YEARS 2019-2022 STRATEGIC PERFORMANCE PLAN The board waived staff’s presentation as it will be presented at the October 19, 2021, board retreat. 13. 2021 DROUGHT UPDATE Customer Service Manager Andrea Carey and Communications Officer Tenille Otero provided the staff report and PowerPoint presentation to the board. Staff responded to questions and concerns from the board. REPORTS 14. GENERAL MANAGER’S REPORT General Manager Martinez presented information from his report that included the district’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, open enrollment, COVID-19 Business Interruption Claim, Sweetwater Authority’s request to open the Douglas interconnect, and conservation 2020 vs. 2021. 15. SAN DIEGO COUNTY WATER AUTHORITY UPDATE President Smith provided an update of CWA’s long range financing plan for 10 years and information of the Regional Storm Water Capture Report. He also reported that a new MWD delegate, Director Marty Miller, replaced former Director Mike Hogan. Director Croucher provided an update on CWA’s board retreat and MWD matters. 16. DIRECTORS' REPORTS/REQUESTS Written reports from Directors Croucher, Keyes, Lopez and Robak were submitted to District Secretary Ramos-Krogman, which will be attached to the minutes for today’s meeting. 4 17. PRESIDENT’S REPORT In response to a question from Director Robak, President Smith stated that he will be the Chair of the Council of Water Utilities beginning October 19, 2021. A written report from President Smith was submitted to District Secretary Ramos-Krogman and will be attached to the minutes for today’s meeting. RECESS TO CLOSED SESSION 18. CLOSED SESSION The board recessed to closed session at 5:35 p.m. to discuss the following matter: a) DISCUSSION RELATING TO CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) AND PUBLIC SERVICES [GOVERNMENT CODE §54957] b) CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS pursuant to California Government Code section 54956.8 Property: SALT CREEK GOLF COURSE 525 HUNTE PARKWAY CHULA VISTA, CA 91914 Agency negotiator: General Counsel Under negotiation: Disposition of Property c) CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL – EXISTING LITIGATION [GOVERNMENT CODE §54956.9] OTAY WATER DISTRICT vs. CITY OF SAN DIEGO; CASE NO. 37-2017- 00019348-CU-WM-CTL d) CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL – EXISTING LITIGATION [GOVERN-MENT CODE §54956.9] MARK COZIAHR, ET AL. vs. OTAY WATE DISTRICT, CASE NO. 37-2015-00400000-CU-MC-CTL RETURN TO OPEN SESSION 19. REPORT ON ANY ACTIONS TAKEN IN CLOSED SESSION. THE BOARD MAY ALSO TAKE ACTION ON ANY ITEMS POSTED IN CLOSED SESSION. The board reconvened from closed session at approximately 6:48 p.m. and General Counsel Dan Shinoff reported that the board took no reportable actions in closed session. 5 OTAY WATER DISTRICT FINANCING AUTHORITY 20. NO MATTERS TO DISCUSS There were no items scheduled for discussion for the Otay Water District Financing Authority board. 21. ADJOURNMENT With no further business to come before the Board, President Smith adjourned the meeting at 6:48 p.m. President ATTEST: District Secretary (Director’s Signature) GM Receipt: Date: FOR OFFICE USE: TOTAL MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT: $ OTAY WATER DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS PER-DIEM AND MILEAGE CLAIM FORM Pay To: Tim Smith Period Covered: Employee Number: 1845 From: 9/1/21 To: 9/30/21 ITEM DATE MEETING PURPOSE / ISSUES DISCUSSED (Via Teleconference) MILEAGE HOME to OWD OWD to HOME MILEAGE OTHER LOCATIONS 1 09/01/21 OWD Regular Board Meeting Monthly Board Meeting - - 2 09/09/21 Otay Matters Update Met with GM Martinez to discuss District matters - - 3 09/10/21 Otay Matters Update Met with GM Martinez to discuss District matters - - 4 09/16/21 Committee Agenda Briefing Met with GM Martinez to review items that will be present at the September committee meetings - - 5 09/19/21 WateReuse Conference JW Marriott Los Angeles Annual Conference to discuss water issues/matters with other water agencies throughout the state - 138 6 09/20/21 WateReuse Conference JW Marriott Los Angeles Annual Conference to discuss water issues/matters with other water agencies throughout the state - - 7 09/21/21 WateReuse Conference JW Marriott Los Angeles Annual Conference to discuss water issues/matters with other water agencies throughout the state (NO CHARGE) - 138 8 09/21/21 EO&WR Committee Meeting Reviewed items that will be presented at the October Board Meeting - - 9 09/22/21 East County Caucus Discuss East County issues with agencies and CWA - - 10 09/22/21 CWA Matters Meeting Discuss CWA Matters with GM Martinez and Director Croucher (NO CHARGE) - - 11 09/27/21 Special Board Meeting; and Ad Hoc Salt Creek Golf Course Meeting Special Board Meeting to adopt resolution to continue virtual/teleconference meetings; Met with Director Robak, GM Martinez, GC Blumenfeld and District staff to discuss Salt Creek Golf Course Property Matters - - Total Meeting Per Diem: $1,368 ($152 per diem) Total Mileage Claimed: 276 miles OTAY WATER DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS EXPENSE CLAIM FORM Pay To: Period Covered: Employee Number: From: To: ITEMIZED REIMBURSEMENT CLAIMED Date Type of Reimbursement Amount TOTAL Reimbursement Claimed: $ Director Signature: Date: GM Receipt: Date: INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE EXHIBIT D Timothy Smith 1845 09/01/21 09/30/21 09/21/21 Hotel Reservation - JW Marriott Los Angeles (WateReuse 2021 Annual Conference)$753.80 10/07/2021 753.80 10/07/2021 (Director’s Signature) GM Receipt: Date: FOR OFFICE USE: TOTAL MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT: $ INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE OTAY WATER DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS PER-DIEM AND MILEAGE CLAIM FORM Pay To: Ryan Keyes Period Covered: Employee Number: 1896 From: 9-1-21 To: 9-30-21 ITEM DATE MEETING PURPOSE / ISSUES DISCUSSED MILEAGE HOME to OWD OWD to HOME MILEAGE OTHER LOCATIONS 1 9-1-21 OWD Regular Board Meeting Monthly Board Meeting - - 2 9-3-21 OWD Finance Dept. Discussion: Financial Overview of OWD - - 3 9-14-21 CSDA Discussion: Special District Construction Projects-1st day - - 4 9-15-21 CSDA Discussion: Special District Construction Projects-2nd Day - - 5 9-21-21 OWD PRL&L Committee Meeting Quarterly PRL&L Committee Meeting - - 6 9-27-21 OWD Special Meeting Special Meeting (WAIVED CHARGE) - - 7 9-30-21 ACWA Meeting Discussion: TerraVerde Energy - - 8 - - 9 - - 10 -- Total Meeting Per Diem: $912 ($152 per meeting) Total Mileage Claimed: 0 Miles 10/12/2021 (Director’s Signature) GM Receipt: Date: FOR OFFICE USE: TOTAL MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT: $ OTAY WATER DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS PER-DIEM AND MILEAGE CLAIM FORM Pay To: Jose Lopez Period Covered: Employee Number: 7010 From: 9/1/21 To: 9/30/21 ITEM DATE MEETING PURPOSE / ISSUES DISCUSSED MILEAGE HOME to OWD OWD to HOME MILEAGE OTHER LOCATIONS 1 09/01 Otay Water District Regular Board Meeting 2 09/07 South Bay Economic Development Council Ray Major- SANDAG 3 09/10 ChulaVista Chamber First Friday meeting (No Charge) 4 9/14 Fellowship Latinos on Water Water issues affecting Latino community 30 5 9/19 Water Reuse Water Reuse Conference 149 6 9/20 Water Reuse Water Reuse Conference 7 9/21 Water Reuse Water Reuse Conference 149 8 9/22 Otay Water District Finance & Admin Committee meeting 9 9/27 Otay Water District Special Board Meeting 10 Total Meeting Per Diem: $ 1216 ($152 per diem) Total Mileage Claimed: 329 miles OTAY WATER DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS EXPENSE CLAIM FORM Pay To: Period Covered: Employee Number: From: To: ITEMIZED REIMBURSEMENT CLAIMED Date Type of Reimbursement Amount TOTAL Reimbursement Claimed: $ Director Signature: Date: GM Receipt: Date: INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE EXHIBIT D Jose Lopez 7010 09/01/21 09/30/21 09/21/21 Hotel Reservation - JW Marriott Los Angeles (WateReuse 2021 Annual Conference) $772.75 10/22/2021 772.75 Mark Robak 7014 From:9/1/2021 9/30/2021 ITEM DATE MEETING PURPOSE / ISSUES MILEAGE HOME TO OWD OWD TO HOME MILEAGE OTHER LOCATIONS 1 9/1/2021 CSDA Annual Conference Discussion of issues facing special districts 0 0 2 9/1/2021 Otay Water District Monthly Board Meeting - NO CHARGE 0 0 3 9/2/2021 CSDA Annual Conference Discussion of issues facing special districts 0 17 4 9/7/2021 East County Chamber of Commerce Government Affairs & Infrastructure Committee 0 0 5 9/10/2021 East County Chamber of Commerce First Friday Breakfast - NO CHARGE 0 0 6 9/15/2021 East County EDC Monthly Board Meeting 0 0 7 9/17/2021 LAFCO Special Districts Advisory Board 0 0 8 9/21/2021 CPRL&L Committee Meeting Discussion of Conservation, Public Relations, Legal & Legislative matters 0 0 9 9/22/2021 Otay Finance & Administration Committee Discuss finance & operations issues 0 0 10 9/27/2021 Otay Special Board Meeting Adopt reslotion to continue teleconferencing - NO CHARGE 0 0 11 9/27/2021 Ad Hoc Salt Creek Golf Course Meeting Discuss disposition of former golf course property 0 0 0 17 $ 1,216 17 Miles GM Receipt: Date: ___________________ FOR OFFICE USE: TOTAL MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT: $_____________ Pay To:Period Covered Employee Number Total Mileage Claimed: Director Signature ($152 PER MEETING) Total Meeting Per Diem: OTAY WATER DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS PER-DIEM AND MILEAGE CLAIM FORM 10/07/2021 STAFF REPORT TYPE MEETING: Regular Board MEETING DATE: November 3, 2021 SUBMITTED BY: Lisa Coburn-Boyd Environmental Compliance Specialist PROJECT: S2069-001101 DIV. NO. 5 APPROVED BY: Bob Kennedy, Engineering Manager Rod Posada, Chief, Engineering Jose Martinez, General Manager SUBJECT: Adoption of a Mitigated Negative Declaration for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project GENERAL MANAGER’S RECOMMENDATION: That the Otay Water District (District) Board of Directors (Board) approves the adoption of a Mitigated Negative Declaration for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project (see Exhibit A for Project location). COMMITTEE ACTION: Please see Attachment A. PURPOSE: To obtain Board approval for the adoption of a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project. ANALYSIS: The District is proposing the replacement of an existing sewer lift station with a new and expanded sewer lift station on the adjacent property and the expansion of an existing access road that provides access to the lift station. The proposed lift station would have a capacity of between 500 and 600 gallons per minute (GPM) and would replace the existing 400-GPM lift station. The expanded capacity AGENDA ITEM 6a 2 would be to serve anticipated development in the area. In addition to expanding lift station capacity, the Project would increase the overall property area to allow for storage and greater functionality. In conjunction with District staff, Helix Environmental prepared the initial study and MND for the Project under their as-needed environmental services contract with the District. The Initial Study concluded that potentially significant impacts would occur with respect to biological resources, cultural resources, hazards and hazardous materials, noise, tribal cultural resources, and wildfire. However, these impacts would be less than significant with mitigation. Mitigation will include construction monitoring (for biological and cultural resources), pre-construction surveys and resource avoidance (for biological resources), noise attenuation (for biological resources, noise), a construction noise management plan (for noise), and a construction fire safety plan (for hazards and hazardous materials and wildfire). The Mitigation, Monitoring, and Reporting Plan (MMRP) provides the details of the measures that need to be taken for mitigation and is included with the Final MND (Attachment B). Based on the findings of these documents, and with proper mitigation measures taken, the Project will not have a significant effect on the environment. During the 30 days notice period for the draft MND, two (2) comment letters were received from the San Diego County Archaeological Society and the California Dept. of Fish & Wildlife. The two letters and the responses to their comments are presented in the Final MND (Attachment B). FISCAL IMPACT: Joe Beachem, Chief Financial Officer None. STRATEGIC GOAL: This Project supports the District’s Mission statement, “To provide exceptional water and wastewater service to its customers, and to manage District resources in a transparent and fiscally responsible manner” and the General Manager’s Vision, "To be a model water agency by providing stellar service, achieving measurable results, and continuously improving operational practices." LEGAL IMPACT: None. 3 LC-B/BK:jf https://otaywater365.sharepoint.com/sites/engcip/Shared Documents/S2069 Cottonwood Sewer Pump Station Expansion/Staff Reports/BD 11-03-21 Staff Report Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project MND (LCB-BK).docx Attachments: Exhibit A – Project Location Map Attachment A – Committee Action Attachment B – Final Mitigated Negative Declaration including Mitigation, Monitoring, and Reporting Plan OTAY WATER DISTRICT COTTONWOOD SEWER LIFT STATION REPLACEMENT PROJECTLOCATION MAP EXHIBIT AC:\Users\donald.bienvenue\Otay Water District\ENG OPERATING - Documents\Technician\GIS\Staff Report Exhibit A.mxd !\ VICINITY MAP PROJECT SITE DIV 5 DIV 1 DIV 2 DIV 4 DIV 3 ÃÅ54 ÃÅ125 ÃÅ94 ÃÅ905 §¨¦805 FNTS PROJECT SITE CIP S2069F 0 4020 Feet PA R F OU R D R IV E ATTACHMENT A SUBJECT/PROJECT: S2069-001101 Adoption of a Mitigated Negative Declaration for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project COMMITTEE ACTION: The Engineering, Operations, and Water Resources Committee (Committee) reviewed this item at a meeting held on October 18, 2021 and the following comments were made: • Staff recommended that the Board approve the adoption of a Mitigated Negative Declaration for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project. • In response to a question from the Committee, staff reported that there are some sensitive resources in the vicinity of the project, but they would be delineated and the construction would not have an impact as there would be monitoring and temporary construction fencing around any sensitive resources. There would be no direct impact. • Staff discussed that the road widening would occur on the west (left) side of the road closest to the golf course. The road widening will enable parking and a way for vehicles to turn around. Prior to the Board Meeting, staff was requested to send to Committee the road widening dimensions. • Staff informed Committee that there were two comment letters, one from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and one from the San Diego Archaeological Society. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife would like to have the mitigation measures have the same wording as the mitigation measures in the District’s Water Facilities Master Plan PEIR. The San Diego Archaeological Society sent a form letter and stated they had no issue with the project. • In response to a question from the Committee, staff responded that as there are homes nearby there will be outreach efforts prior to construction. • In response to a question from the Committee, staff responded that they are finalizing an offer letter to the Cottonwood Golf Course for the land purchase of acquiring additional property to build the new lift station while the existing station remains in operation. Following the discussion, the Committee supported staffs’ recommendation and presentation to the full board as a Consent Item. Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project Final Initial Study/ Mitigated Negative Declaration State Clearinghouse No. 2021090010 October 2021 | 00623.00006.006 Prepared for: Otay Water District2554 Sweetwater Springs Boulevard Spring Valley, CA 91978-2096 Prepared by: HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc. 7578 El Cajon Boulevard La Mesa, CA 91942 ATTACHMENT B This page intentionally left blank   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project Final Initial Study/ Mitigated Negative Declaration State Clearinghouse No. 2021090010 Prepared for: Otay Water District 2554 Sweetwater Springs Boulevard Spring Valley, CA 91978-2096 Prepared by: HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc. 7578 El Cajon Boulevard La Mesa, CA 91942 October 2021 | 00623.00006.006   This page intentionally left blank   i  TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page  FOREWORD ................................................................................................................................. FWD‐1  MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION ......................................................................................... MND‐1  1.0 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................... 1  1.1 Initial Study Information Sheet ........................................................................................... 1  1.2 Environmental Factors Potentially Affected ....................................................................... 4  1.3 Determination ..................................................................................................................... 5  2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL INITIAL STUDY CHECKLIST ........................................................................... 6  I. Aesthetics ............................................................................................................................ 7  II. Agriculture and Forestry Resources .................................................................................... 8  III. Air Quality ......................................................................................................................... 10  IV. Biological Resources ......................................................................................................... 15  V. Cultural Resources ............................................................................................................ 23  VI. Energy ............................................................................................................................... 25  VII. Geology and Soils .............................................................................................................. 26  VIII. Greenhouse Gas Emissions ............................................................................................... 30  IX. Hazards and Hazardous Materials .................................................................................... 33  X. Hydrology and Water Quality ........................................................................................... 36  XI. Land Use and Planning ...................................................................................................... 39  XII. Mineral Resources ............................................................................................................ 40  XIII. Noise ................................................................................................................................. 41  XIV. Population and Housing .................................................................................................... 48  XV. Public Services ................................................................................................................... 49  XVI. Recreation ......................................................................................................................... 50  XVII. Transportation .................................................................................................................. 51  XVIII. Tribal Cultural Resources .................................................................................................. 52  XIX. Utilities and Service Systems ............................................................................................ 54  XX. Wildfire ............................................................................................................................. 55  XXI. Mandatory Findings of Significance .................................................................................. 57  3.0 PREPARERS ............................................................................................................................ 59  4.0 REFERENCES .......................................................................................................................... 60       ii  TABLE OF CONTENTS (cont.) LIST OF APPENDICES    A Air Quality Modeling Outputs  B Biological Assessment  C Cultural Resources Study  D Noise Impact Analysis  E Notice of Intent (NOI) and Proof of Publication   F Comment Letters and Responses   G Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program       LIST OF FIGURES    No. Title Follows Page    1 Regional Location ............................................................................................................................. 2  2 Aerial Photograph ............................................................................................................................ 2  3 Project Site ....................................................................................................................................... 2  4 Vegetation Communities and Sensitive Resources ....................................................................... 18      LIST OF TABLES    No. Title Page    1 Screening‐Level Thresholds for Air Quality Impact Analysis .......................................................... 12  2 Estimated Maximum Daily Construction Emissions ...................................................................... 13  3 Maximum Daily Operational Emissions ......................................................................................... 14  4 Total Estimated Construction GHG Emissions ............................................................................... 31  5 Total Estimated Operational GHG Emissions ................................................................................. 32  6 Lift Station Construction Noise Levels ........................................................................................... 44         iii  ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AB Assembly Bill    bgs below ground surface   BMP best management practice     CAAQS California Ambient Air Quality Standards  CAL FIRE California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection   CalEEMod California Emissions Estimator Model   Cal‐OSHA California Occupational Safety and Health Administration   Caltrans  California Department of Transportation  CAPCOA California Air Pollution Control Officers Association   CARB California Air Resources Control Board  CBC California Building Code   CDFW California Department of Fish and Wildlife   CEQA California Environmental Quality Act   CFC chlorofluorocarbon   CH4 methane  CNDDB California Natural Diversity Database   CNEL Community Noise Equivalent Level  CNPS California Native Plant Society   CO carbon monoxide   CO2 carbon dioxide   CO2e carbon dioxide equivalent   CRHR California Register of Historical Resources   CY  cubic yard(s)    dB decibel   dBA A‐weighted decibel   DPM diesel particulate matter     FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency     GHG greenhouse gas  gpm gallons per minute     HFC hydrofluorocarbon   HP horsepower  Hz hertz    IBC International Building Code  IS Initial Study     kHz kilohertz       iv  ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (cont.) LDN Day Night sound level    MBTA Migratory Bird Treaty Act   MEI maximally exposed individual   mPa micro Pascals  mph  miles per hour  MRZ Mineral Resource Zone  MT metric ton    N2O nitrous oxide   NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards  NAHC Native American Heritage Commission   NOX nitrogen oxides   NPDES National Pollution Discharge Elimination System   NSLU noise sensitive land use    O3 ozone   OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration   OWD Otay Water District    PFC perfluorocarbon   PM10 particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter  PM2.5 particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter  PPV peak particle velocity     RWQCB Regional Water Quality Control Board    SANDAG San Diego Association of Governments  SB Senate Bill  SDAB San Diego Air Basin  SDAPCD San Diego Air Pollution Control District   SF6 sulfur hexafluoride   SIP State Implementation Plan  SO2 sulfur dioxide  SPL sound pressure level   SR State Route  STC Sound Transmission Class    TAC toxic air contaminant     USEPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service     VOC volatile organic compound  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 FWD-1 FOREWORD A Draft Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration (IS/MND) for the Otay Water District (OWD) Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project (Project) was prepared and circulated for a 30-day public review that began on September 1, 2021 and ended on September 30, 2021 (State Clearinghouse No. 2021090010). All written comments received on the Draft IS/MND during the public review period, responses to the comments, and revisions to the Draft IS/MND have been incorporated into this Final IS/MND. The Notice of Intent to Adopt a Mitigated Negative Declaration and Notice of a Public Hearing and proof of publication in local newspapers are included in Appendix E. This Final IS/MND has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the CEQA guidelines. The purpose of the Final IS/MND is to provide the decision-making body, in this case OWD, public and quasi-public agencies and groups, and the general public environmental impact information relative to the proposed Project. OWD will consider the information contained in this Final IS/MND prior to approving the Project. The Final IS/MND includes the Draft IS/MND, Technical Appendices, and copies of each public letter commenting on the Draft IS/MND and OWD’s responses thereto. Public comments and the OWD’s responses are included in Appendix F of the Final IS/MND. Each public comment is assigned a comment number that corresponds to a response number. The Final IS/MND contains minor revisions, including clarifications and corrections. Where changes have been made to the Final IS/MND as a result of clarifications, such revision is indicated in the Final IS/MND using strikeout/underline text and by an outside margin line. Comments were received during public review of the Draft IS/MND regarding the potential impacts and mitigation associated with biological resources and cultural resources. In response to these comments, OWD has refined mitigation measures MM-BIO-1 and MM-BIO-2 to provide additional clarification on the implementation of these measures. No changes to the cultural resources mitigation measures were warranted. Clarifications on the Project’s usage of construction and operational lighting were made in Section 1.0, Introduction, and in Section 2.0, Environmental Initial Study Checklist, Item I(d) (Aesthetics). Additional minor revisions were made for the following items within Section 2.0, Environmental Initial Study Checklist: Item IV(a) (Biological Resources), Item IX(g) (Hazards and Hazardous Materials), Item XX(b) (Wildfire), and Item XXI(c) (Mandatory Findings of Significance). No new information has been presented in the Final IS/MND that would require recirculation of the Draft IS/MND pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15088.5(a). Specifically, no new significant environmental impacts would result from the Project or from new mitigation measures proposed for implementation. No information was added to the Final IS/MND that would result in a substantial increase in the severity of an environmental impact unless mitigation measures are adopted that reduce the impact to a level of insignificance. No new mitigation measures considerably different from others previously analyzed would lessen the severity of an environmental impact. Finally, the Draft IS/MND included adequate information for a meaningful public review and comment. The Final IS/MND also includes the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, appended to this document as Appendix G. Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 FWD-2 This page intentionally left blank Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 MND-1 FINAL MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION 1. Project title: Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project 2. Project description: The Project involves the replacement of an existing sewer lift station with a new and expanded sewer lift station on the adjacent property and the expansion an existing access road that provides access to the lift station. The proposed lift station would have a capacity of between 500 and 600 gallons per minute (gpm) and would replace the existing 400-gpm lift station. The expanded capacity would be to serve anticipated development in the area. In addition to expanding lift station capacity, the Project would increase the overall property area to allow for storage and greater functionality. 3. Project location: The Project is located in the unincorporated community of Jamul in eastern San Diego County, 0.9 mile north of State Route (SR) 94 and 0.6 mile southeast of SR 54. The Project site extends north from the western terminus of Par 4 Drive, approximately 1,500 feet west of Steele Canyon Road, and is partially within an abandoned area of the golf course associated with the Cottonwood Golf Club. 4. Lead Agency: Otay Water District 2554 Sweetwater Springs Boulevard Spring Valley, CA 91978-2096 The Lead Agency, having reviewed the Initial Study for this Project, does hereby find and declare that the Project will not have a significant effect on the environment. A brief statement of the reasons supporting the Lead Agency’s findings are as follows: An Initial Study was conducted to evaluate the potential effects of this Project upon the environment. Based upon the findings contained in the attached Initial Study, it has been determined that this Project would have a less than significant impact on the environment. The Initial Study concluded that potentially significant impacts would occur with respect to biological resources (San Diego ambrosia, coastal California gnatcatcher, Cooper’s hawk, and other birds and raptors), cultural resources (archaeological resources and human remains), hazards and hazardous materials (wildland fire), noise (during both Project construction and operation), tribal cultural resources, and wildfire; however, impacts would be less than significant with mitigation. Potential impacts to biological resources would be avoided through construction monitoring, pre-construction surveys, noise attenuation, and resource avoidance. Potential impacts to cultural resources and tribal cultural resources would be avoided through monitoring of ground-disturbing construction activities. Potential impacts related to hazards and hazardous materials and wildfire would be avoided through implementation of a construction fire safety plan. Potential impacts related to noise would be avoided through implementation of a construction noise management plan and through noise attenuation of the proposed lift station and generator. The Project would result in less than significant or no impacts to the following environmental issues areas: aesthetics, agriculture and forestry resources, air quality, energy, geology and soils, greenhouse gas emissions, hydrology and water quality, land use and Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project I October 2021 planning mineral resources, population and housing, publ¡c services, recreation, transportation, and utilities and service systems. Accordingly, a Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared. The Lead Agency hereby finds that the Mitigated Negative Declaration reflects its independent judgment. A copy of the lnitial Study is attached. The location and custodian of the documents and other materials which constitute the record of proceedings upon which the Lead Agency based its decision to adopt this Mitigated Negative Declaration are as follows: Otay Water District 2554 Sweetwater Springs Boulevard Spring Valley, CA 91978-2096 https://otavwater.sov/about-otav/news-and-documents/publications-and-public-notices/ Õarl. b 26>l & ;n-* ds2,x',¡,'-, .V+r'-l Date StañSignature 0 MND-2 Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  1  1.0 INTRODUCTION The following Initial Study (IS) addresses the environmental impacts associated with the construction  and operation of Otay Water District’s (herein referred to as “OWD”) proposed Cottonwood Sewer Lift  Station Replacement Project (herein referred to as “Project” or “proposed Project”). The purpose of the  proposed Project is to replace and expand the existing sewer lift station to provide increased sewer  capacity for planned development in the Project area. This IS has been prepared in accordance with the  California Environmental Quality Act of 1970 (CEQA), as amended, and the State CEQA Guidelines.  1.1 INITIAL STUDY INFORMATION SHEET 1. Project title: Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project   2. Lead agency name and address: Otay Water District   2554 Sweetwater Springs Boulevard  Spring Valley, CA 91978‐2096  3. Contact person and phone number: Lisa Coburn‐Boyd   619‐670‐2219  4. Project location: The Project site is located at the western terminus  of Par 4 Drive in unincorporated San Diego County.   5. General plan designation:  Open Space (Recreation)   6. Zoning: S88 (Specific Plan Area)    7. Description of Project:  The Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project (Project) is located in the unincorporated  community of Jamul in eastern San Diego County, 0.9 mile north of State Route (SR) 94 and 0.6 mile  southeast of SR 54 (see Figure 1, Regional Location). The Project site extends north from the western  terminus of Par 4 Drive, approximately 1,500 feet west of Steele Canyon Road, and is partially within an  abandoned area of the golf course associated with the Cottonwood Golf Club (see Figure 2, Aerial  Photograph). Access to the site is provided via Par 4 Drive and Steele Canyon Road, either from SR 94 to  the south or from Willow Glen Drive and SR 54 to the north.  OWD proposes the Project to replace an existing sewer lift station with a new and expanded sewer lift  station on the adjacent property and expand an existing access road that provides access to the lift  station. The existing lift station is located within a 40‐foot by 40‐foot OWD easement. The existing  access road runs south from the existing lift station through a 20‐foot wide by 312‐foot long OWD  easement to the western terminus of Par 4 Drive. The total area of the existing easements is 0.18 acre.  As part of the Project, OWD would acquire 0.19 acre of property to the west of the existing easements,  resulting in a total Project site area of 0.37 acre (see Figure 3, Site Plan).   The proposed lift station would have a capacity of between 500 and 600 gallons per minute (gpm) and  would replace the existing 400‐gpm lift station. The expanded capacity would be to serve anticipated  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  2  development in the area. In addition to expanding lift station capacity, the Project would increase the  overall property area to allow for storage and greater functionality (e.g., maintenance trucks being able  to turn around).   The Project site would include the lift station structure, a diesel‐powered emergency backup generator,  an emergency storage tank, an existing transformer (to remain), and the expanded access road. The lift  station structure would house a below‐grade wet well and dry well, two 40‐horsepower (HP) pumps, a  fan for ventilation, and a control room. The generator, emergency storage tank, and existing  transformer would be located on a concrete pad that would surround the lift station structure. The  emergency storage tank would have a capacity of approximately 40,000 gallons, or enough to provide at  least two hours of storage. During normal operations, the lift station would be powered by the existing  on‐site transformer that currently powers the existing lift station. The emergency backup generator  would power the lift station in the instance of failure of the transformer.   The lift station would tie in to and receive wastewater flows from an existing 10‐inch gravity sewer,  located at a depth of 12 feet below ground surface (bgs) at the site, that conveys wastewater west from  residential development located to the east of the site. After being pumped at the lift station, the  wastewater would be discharged into an existing 6‐inch sewer force main, located approximately four  feet bgs at the site, then be conveyed east and then north along Steele Canyon Road to an existing  gravity sewer in Willow Glen Drive. The flows would then be conveyed via existing pipelines to OWD’s  Ralph W. Chapman Water Recycling Facility, located approximately 0.8 mile southwest of the  intersection of SR 94 and SR 54, where it would be treated.   The existing lift station would remain in operation until the new lift station is constructed and ready for  operation to allow for continuous wastewater conveyance. Once the new lift station becomes  operational, the existing lift station would be demolished.   Construction of the Project would require site preparation to clear existing vegetation, excavation for  the below‐grade wet well and dry well, light grading for the site area surrounding the lift station and for  the expanded access road, construction of the lift station structure and site area pad, installation and  connection of facilities, paving, and demolition of existing structures. Construction is expected to last  approximately one year and would occur between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. in accordance  with the County of San Diego Municipal Code. Within this timeframe, construction is expected to occur  during daylight hours and no construction lighting is anticipated to be used. Excavation is currently  estimated to result in 1,500 cubic yards (CY) of export, which would be either taken by the adjacent golf  course property or transported to an existing legal disposal site. Construction staging would occur either  within the Project site or within adjacent disturbed areas of the abandoned golf course.  The proposed facilities would be designed and constructed in conformance with pertinent engineering  standards, including applicable elements of the Water Agencies’ Standards Design Guidelines for Water,  Recycled Water and Sewer Facilities and Standard Specifications for Water, Recycled Water and Sewer  Facilities, which OWD has adopted as their design and construction standards. The Project would also  conform to current versions of the International Code Council International Building Code (IBC) and the  related California Building Standards Commission California Building Code (CBC).   Once construction activities are complete, activities on site would be limited to routine maintenance of  facilities, consistent with the requirements of the current lift station. The diesel‐powered backup  generator would run a maximum of 50 hours annually for maintenance and testing purposes, and then  ! ! !! 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!!!!!! !!!!!!!! !!!!!!!! !!!!!! !! !! !"a$?¹ !"^$ ?³ ?¸ !"^$WÌ !"a$?¸ ?¸ ?t WÊ ?¦ ?¦%&s( !"a$!"^$ WÌ !"_$ !"_$ ?n Ag Aä ?Ë ?p !"^$%&u( %&s( ?Ë Aä ?p ?¹ POWAY OCEANSIDE CARLSBAD VISTA ESCONDIDO OTAY CHULA VISTA SANTEE SANMARCOS ENCINITAS EL CAJON LA MESA CORONADO NATIONALCITY IMPERIALBEACH LEMONGROVE SOLANABEACH DEL MAR SANDIEGO CAMP PENDLETON LakeSan Marcos Lake Hodges Lake Wohlford Lake RamonaLake Poway Miramar Reservoir San VicenteReservoir LakeMurray SweetwaterReservoir LakeJennings OtayReservoir Pacific Ocean San Die g o B a y Santee Lakes SutherlandReservoir Lake Henshaw El Capitan Reservoir Loveland Reservoir Vail Lake O'Neill Lake Barrett Lake TIJUANA UNIT ED STAT ES MEXIC O DULZURA JULIAN RAMONA WARNERSPRINGS RIVERSIDECOUNTY ORANGECOUNTY SAN DIEGOCOUNTY !Project Site ALPINELAJOLLA ?¹ FALLBROOK Figure 1 Regional Location I:\PROJECTS\O\OWD\OWD-06.06_Cottonwood\Map\IS\Fig1_Regional.mxd OWD-06.06 2/26/2021 -DY Source: Base Map Layers (SanGIS, 2016)K Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement 0 8 Miles This page intentionally left blank Par Four Dr W il d w i n d D r Figure 2 Aerial Photograph I:\PROJECTS\O\OWD\OWD-06.06_Cottonwood\Map\IS\Fig2_Aerial.mxd OWD-06.06 2/26/2021 -DY Source: Aerial (SanGIS, 2020)K Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement 0 100 Feet Project Site This page intentionally left blank Site Plan Figure 3 I: \ P R O J E C T S \ O \ O W D \ O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 _ C o t t o n w o o d \ M a p \ I S \ F i g 3 _ S i t e P l a n . i n d d A B C - 0 1 0 2 / 2 6 / 2 0 2 1 - D Y Source: Otay Water District (2021) Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacemenment This page intentionally left blank  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  3  when normal power supply is lost. Little to no lighting would be required for operation of the proposed  facilities. If lighting is required, it would be low illumination, shielded, and directed downwards and  away from adjacent habitat areas.  8. Surrounding land uses and setting:  The Project site and land to the north and west are developed with a golf course and have a land use  designation of Open Space (Recreation). Land to the east and southeast is developed with single family  residences and has a land use designation of Semi‐Rural Residential. Land to the southwest includes the  San Diego National Wildlife Refuge and has a land use designation of Public Agency Lands.   9. Other public agencies whose approval is required (e.g., permits, financing approval, or  participation agreement):   County of San Diego Excavation Permit    Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) Groundwater Discharge Permit (if  necessary)  10. Have California Native American tribes traditionally and culturally affiliated with the Project area  requested consultation pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21080.3.1? If so, is there a plan  for consultation that includes, for example, the determination of significance of impacts to tribal  cultural resources, procedures regarding confidentiality, etc.?  Pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21080.3.1 (Assembly Bill 52), California Native American  tribes traditionally and cultural affiliated with the project area can request notification of projects in  their traditional cultural territory. At this time, no Native American tribes have requested that OWD  provide notification to the tribe of projects in the tribe’s area of traditional and cultural affiliation. As  part of the Cultural Resources Study prepared for the Project, the Native American Heritage Commission  (NAHC) was contacted for a Sacred Lands File search on February 23, 2021. The NAHC responded on  March 8, 2021, indicating that the search results were positive and that the Ewiiaapaayp Band of  Kumeyaay Indians, the Kwaaymii Laguna Band of Mission Indians, and the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay  Indians should be contacted for more information. These tribes, along with other Native American  representatives and interested parties identified by the NAHC, were contacted in March 2021. To date,  one response has been received: the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians stated that the area containing  the Project site has cultural significance or ties to Viejas. Viejas requested that a Kumeyaay Native  American monitor be on site for ground‐disturbing activities and to be informed of any discoveries  found during construction. In addition, a tribal representative from Jamul Indian Village was present  during the pedestrian survey undertaken for the Project.  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  4  1.2 ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS POTENTIALLY AFFECTED The environmental factors checked below would be potentially affected by this Project, involving at  least one impact that is a “Potentially Significant Impact” or “Less than Significant with Mitigation  Incorporated” as indicated by the checklist on the following pages.  ☐ Aesthetics ☐ Agriculture and Forestry  Resources  ☐ Air Quality  ☒ Biological Resources ☒ Cultural Resources  ☐ Energy   ☐ Geology and Soils ☐ Greenhouse Gas Emissions ☒ Hazards and Hazardous  Materials  ☐ Hydrology and Water  Quality  ☐ Land Use and Planning ☐ Mineral Resources  ☒ Noise ☐ Population and Housing ☐ Public Services  ☐ Recreation ☐ Transportation ☒ Tribal Cultural Resources  ☐ Utilities and Service  Systems  ☒ Wildfire ☒ Mandatory Findings of  Significance       Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project I October 2021 I.3 DETERMINATION On the basis of this initialevaluation: Sign re Li¿a (-abt ra. ßow¿l Date For Otay Water DistrictPrinted Name I find that the proposed Project COULD NOT have a significant effect on the environment, and a NEGATIVE DECLARATION wíll be prepared. x I find that although the proposed Project could have a significant effect on the environment, there will not be a significant effect in this case because revisions in the project have been made by or agreed to by the project proponent. A MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECI.ARATION will be prepared. u I find that the proposed Project MAY have a significant effect on the environment, and an ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT is required. I find that the proposed Project MAY have a "potentially significant impact" or "potentially significant unless mitigated" ímpact on the environment, but at least one effect l) has been adequately analyzed in an earlier document pursuant to applicable legal standards, and 2) has been addressed by mitigation measures based on the earlier analysís as described on attached sheets. An ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT is required, but it must analyze only the effects that remain to be addressed. I find that although the proposed Project could have a significant effect on the environment, because all potentially significant effects (a) have been analyzed adequately in an earlier EIR or NEGATIVE DECLARATION pursuant to applicable standards, and (b) have been avoided or mitigated pursuant to that earlier EIR or NEGATIVE DECLARATION, including revisions or mitigation measures that are imposed upon the proposed Proiect, nothing further is required. 5 Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  6  2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL INITIAL STUDY CHECKLIST The lead agency has defined the column headings in the environmental checklist as follows:  A. “Potentially Significant Impact” is appropriate if there is substantial evidence that an effect may  be significant. If there are one or more “Potentially Significant Impact” entries when the  determination is made, an EIR is required.  B. “Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated” applies where the inclusion of mitigation  measures has reduced an effect from “Potentially Significant Impact” to a “Less Than Significant  Impact.” All mitigation measures are described, including a brief explanation of how the  measures reduce the effect to a less than significant level. Mitigation measures from earlier  analyses may be cross‐referenced.   C. “Less Than Significant Impact” applies where the project does not create an impact that exceeds  a stated significance threshold.  D. “No Impact” applies where a project does not create an impact in that category. “No Impact”  answers do not require an explanation if they are adequately supported by the information  sources cited by the lead agency which show that the impact simply does not apply to projects  like the one involved (e.g., the project falls outside a fault rupture zone). A “No Impact” answer  should be explained where it is based on project‐specific factors as well as general standards  (e.g., the project would not expose sensitive receptors to pollutants, based on a project specific  screening analysis).  The explanation of each issue identifies the significance criteria or threshold used to evaluate each  question; and the mitigation measure identified, if any, to reduce the impact to less than significance.  Earlier analyses may be used where, pursuant to the tiering, program EIR, or other CEQA process, an  effect has been adequately analyzed in an earlier EIR or negative declaration [CEQA Guidelines  Section 15063(c)(3)(D)]. Where appropriate, the discussion identifies the following:  a) Earlier Analyses Used. Identifies where earlier analyses are available for review.  b) Impacts Adequately Addressed. Identifies which effects from the checklist were within the scope  of and adequately analyzed in an earlier document pursuant to applicable legal standards, and  states whether such effects were addressed by mitigation measures based on the earlier  analysis.  c) Mitigation Measures. For effects that are “Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated,”  describes the mitigation measures which were incorporated or refined from the earlier  document and the extent to which they address site‐specific conditions for the project.     Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  7  I. AESTHETICS   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Except as provided in Public Resources Code Section 21099,  would the Project:      a) Have a substantial adverse effect on a scenic vista? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Substantially damage scenic resources, including, but not  limited to, trees, rock outcroppings, and historic buildings  within a state scenic highway?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  c) In non‐urbanized areas, substantially degrade the existing  visual character or quality of public views of the site and  its surroundings? (Public views are those that are  experienced from publicly accessible vantage point). If the  Project is in an urbanized area, would the Project conflict  with applicable zoning and other regulations governing  scenic quality?   ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  d) Create a new source of substantial light or glare which  would adversely affect day or nighttime views in the  area?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐    a) Have a substantial adverse effect on a scenic vista?  Less Than Significant Impact. Scenic vistas in the vicinity of the Project site are associated with the  Sweetwater River valley and surrounding mesas and mountainous topography. The Project would  introduce visible aboveground components during construction and operation; however, these  components would not have a substantial adverse effect on a scenic vista. During Project construction,  equipment and vehicles would be present at the Project site, but Project construction would be  temporary (approximately one year) and relatively minor in extent, requiring only a few pieces of  equipment at any one time. During Project operations, new permanent visible components of the  Project would include the lift station structure, generator, storage tank, and a wall and/or fencing  surrounding the site. Based on the location of the Project components at the end of a private access  road and between private residential properties and a decommissioned golf course, the components  would generally not be visible to members of the public or obstruct scenic vistas. In addition, based on  the existing vegetation providing screening between the residential properties to the east and the  Project site, and the relatively small scale of the proposed components, the Project would not have an  adverse effect on a scenic vista for adjacent residences. As such, impacts would be less than significant.   b) Substantially damage scenic resources, including, but not limited to, trees, rock outcroppings, and  historic buildings within a state scenic highway?  No Impact. There are five highways in the San Diego region that are officially designated by the  California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) as state scenic highways, including SR 52 (from Santo  Road to Mast Boulevard, adjacent to Mission Trails Regional Park), SR 75 (San Diego‐Coronado Bay  Bridge and Silver Strand), SR 78 (adjacent to Anza Borrego State Park), SR 163 (adjacent to Balboa Park),  and SR 125 (from Interstate 8 to SR 94; Caltrans 2019). None of the officially designated highways is in  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  8  proximity to the Project site. One eligible scenic highway, SR 94 from Interstate 8 to SR 125, is located  approximately 0.8 mile south of the Project site. The Project site is not visible from SR 94 due to distance  and intervening topography and development. As such, the Project would not damage scenic resources  within a state scenic highway and impacts would occur.   c) In non‐urbanized areas, substantially degrade the existing visual character or quality of public views  of the site and its surroundings? (Public views are those that are experienced from publicly  accessible vantage point). If the Project is in an urbanized area, would the Project conflict with  applicable zoning and other regulations governing scenic quality?  Less Than Significant Impact. As discussed in Item I(a), above, equipment and vehicles would be present  at the Project site during Project construction, but construction would be temporary (approximately one  year) and relatively minor in extent, requiring only a few pieces of equipment at any one time. During  Project operations, new permanent visible components of the Project would include the lift station  structure, generator, storage tank, and a wall and/or fencing surrounding the site. Based on the location  of the Project components at the end of a private access road and between private residential  properties and a decommissioned golf course, the components would generally not be visible to  members of the public. Further, the Project would replace an existing lift station and would not  represent a considerable change from or substantially degrade the existing visual character of the site.  As such, impacts would be less than significant.   d) Create a new source of substantial light or glare that would adversely affect day or nighttime views  in the area?  Less Than Significant Impact. Project construction would occur between of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. in  accordance with the County of San Diego Municipal Code and is anticipated to be limited to daylight  hours within that timeframe. It is therefore not expected that the Project would utilize construction  lighting. Little to no lighting would be required for operation of the proposed facilities. If lighting is  required, it would be low illumination, shielded, and directed downwards and away from adjacent  habitat areas. Additionally, the Project would not include surface structures with the potential to  generate substantial glare (e.g., higher profile glass or stainless‐steel facilities). As a result, impacts  related to light or glare would be less than significant.  II. AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY RESOURCES   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Convert Prime Farmland, Unique Farmland, or Farmland  of Statewide Importance (Farmland), as shown on the  maps prepared pursuant to the Farmland Mapping and  Monitoring Program of the California Resources Agency,  to non‐agricultural use?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  b) Conflict with existing zoning for agricultural use, or a  Williamson Act contract? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  9    Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  c) Conflict with existing zoning for, or cause rezoning of,  forest land (as defined in Public Resources Code  Section 12220(g)), timberland (as defined by Public  Resources Code Section 4526), or timberland zoned  Timberland Production (as defined by Government Code  Section 51104(g))?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  d) Result in the loss of forest land or conversion of forest  land to non‐forest use? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  e) Involve other changes in the existing environment which,  due to their location or nature, could result in conversion  of Farmland, to non‐agricultural use or conversion of  forest land to non‐ forest use?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    a) Convert Prime Farmland, Unique Farmland, or Farmland of Statewide Importance (Farmland), as  shown on the maps prepared pursuant to the Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program of the  California Resources Agency, to non‐agricultural use?  No Impact. According to the California Department of Conservation’s Farmland Mapping and  Monitoring Program, the Project site is mapped as Urban and Built‐Up Land (California Department of  Conservation 2016). As such, implementation of the Project of would not convert Prime Farmland,  Unique Farmland, or Farmland of Statewide Importance to non‐agricultural use. No impact would occur.   b) Conflict with existing zoning for agricultural use, or a Williamson Act contract?  No Impact. The Project site is zoned as Specific Plan Area (S88) and is not subject to a Williamson Act  contract. Although land to the east of the Project site is zoned as Limited Agriculture (A70), it is  developed with residential land uses, is designated as Urban and Built‐Up Land by the California  Department of Conservation (2016) and is not under Williamson Act contract. As such, the Project would  not conflict with existing zoning for agricultural use or a Williamson Act contract, and no impact would  occur.   c) Conflict with existing zoning for, or cause rezoning of, forest land (as defined in Public Resources  Code Section 12220(g)), timberland (as defined by Public Resources Code Section 4526), or  timberland zoned Timberland Production (as defined by Government Code Section 51104(g))?  No Impact. The Project site is zoned as Specific Plan Area (S88) and has a land use designation of Open  Space (Recreation). The Project site is not designated or zoned for forest land, timberland, or timberland  zoned Timberland Production. As such, implementation of the Project would not conflict with existing  zoning for such lands, and no impact would occur.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  10  d) Result in the loss of forest land or conversion of forest land to non‐forest use?  No Impact. The Project site is not located within or adjacent to areas designated or zoned as forest land.  It also does not support forests. As a result, implementation of the Project would not convert forest land  to non‐forest use, and no impact would occur.   e) Involve other changes in the existing environment which, due to their location or nature, could  result in conversion of Farmland to non‐agricultural use or conversion of forest land to non‐forest  use?  No Impact. There are no agriculture‐ or forestry‐related uses located within or adjacent to the Project  site. Although land to the east of the Project site is zoned as Limited Agriculture (A70), it is developed  with residential land uses and is designated as Urban and Built‐Up Land by the California Department of  Conservation (2016). As such, the proposed Project would not involve changes that could result in  conversion of Farmland to non‐agricultural use or conversion of forest land to non‐forest use, and no  impact would occur.   III. AIR QUALITY   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Where available, the significance criteria established by the  applicable air quality management district or air pollution  control district may be relied upon to make the following  determinations. Would the Project:       a) Conflict with or obstruct implementation of the applicable  air quality plan? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Result in a cumulatively considerable net increase of any  criteria pollutant for which the Project region is non‐  attainment under an applicable federal or state ambient air  quality standard?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  c) Expose sensitive receptors to substantial pollutant  concentrations? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  d) Result in other emissions (such as those leading to odors)  adversely affecting a substantial number of people? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐    a) Conflict with or obstruct implementation of the applicable air quality plan?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project site is located within the San Diego Air Basin (SDAB) under the  jurisdiction of the South Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDAPCD). SDAPCD develops and administers  local regulations for stationary air pollutant course within the SCAB and develops plans and programs to  meet attainment requirements for both the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and  California Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS). SDAPCD and the San Diego Association of  Governments (SANDAG) are responsible for developing and implementing the air plan for attainment  and maintenance of ambient air quality standards in the SDAB. The regional air quality plan for San  Diego County is SDAPCD’s 2020 Plan for Attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  11  in San Diego County (Attainment Plan; SDAPCD 2020). The Attainment Plan, which would be a revision  to the state implementation plan (SIP), outlines SDAPCD’s plans and control measures designed to attain  the NAAQS for ozone. These plans accommodate emissions from all sources, including natural sources,  through implementation of control measures, where feasible, on stationary sources to attain the  standards. Mobile sources are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and  California Air Resources Control Board (CARB), and the emissions and reduction strategies related to  mobile sources are considered in the Attainment Plan and SIP.  The Attainment Plan relies on information from CARB and SANDAG, including mobile and area source  emissions, as well as information regarding projected growth in the County, to project future emissions  and then determine from that the strategies necessary for the reduction of emissions through  regulatory controls. CARB mobile source emission projections and SANDAG growth projections are  based on population and vehicle trends and land use plans developed by the cities and by the County. As  such, projects that propose development that is consistent with the growth anticipated by the local  jurisdictions’ general plans would be consistent with the Attainment Plan.  The Project would replace an existing lift station to increase capacity to serve anticipated population  growth in the area; the Project itself would not cause or generate population growth. Jobs associated  with construction of the new lift station would be filled by the local labor pool and jobs associated with  operation of the new lift station would be filled by existing employees servicing the existing lift station.  The Project would not create conditions for population or employment growth that exceeds estimates  for the area. As such, the Project would be consistent with growth anticipated in the County general  plan and would not conflict with the Attainment Plan. Impacts would be less than significant.   b) Result in a cumulatively considerable net increase of any criteria pollutant for which the project  region is non‐ attainment under an applicable federal or state ambient air quality standard?   Less Than Significant Impact. The Project would generate emissions of criteria pollutants during  construction and operation. Criteria pollutants include carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOX),  ozone (O3), particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10), particulate matter less than  2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and lead. In analyzing cumulative criteria pollutant  emissions impacts from a project, the analysis must specifically evaluate a project’s contribution to the  cumulative increase in pollutants for which the SDAB is listed as nonattainment for the CAAQS and the  NAAQS. The SDAB has been designated as a federal nonattainment area for O3, and a State  nonattainment area for O3, PM10, and PM2.5 (SDAPCD 2017). Since few sources emit O3 directly, and O3 is  caused by complex chemical reactions, control of O3 is accomplished by the control of emissions of the  precursors NOX and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). By its very nature, air pollution is largely a  cumulative impact. The nonattainment status of regional pollutants is a result of past and present  development within the air basin. Thus, this regional impact is a cumulative impact, and projects would  contribute to this impact only on a cumulative basis. No single project would be sufficient in size, by  itself, to result in nonattainment of the regional air quality standards. Consequently, if a project’s  emissions do not exceed identified screening level thresholds, its emissions would not result in a  cumulatively considerable contribution to the significant cumulative impact.   To determine whether the Project would result in a cumulatively considerable increase of PM2.5, PM10,  or exceed quantitative thresholds for ozone precursors (i.e., NOX and VOCs), contribute substantially to a  projected air quality violation, or have an adverse effect on human health, Project emissions may be  evaluated based on the quantitative emission thresholds established by the SDAPCD. As part of its air  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  12  quality permitting process, the SDAPCD has established thresholds in Rules 20.2 and 20.3 for the  preparation of Air Quality Impact Assessments. In the absence of a SDAPCD adopted thresholds VOCs,  the South Coast Air Quality Management District’s (SCAQMD’s) screening thresholds for VOCs are used  (SCAQMD 2019). The screening thresholds used in this analysis are presented in Table 1, Screening‐level  Thresholds for Air Quality Impact Analysis.   Table 1  SCREENING‐LEVEL THRESHOLDS FOR AIR QUALITY IMPACT ANALYSIS  Criteria Pollutant Emission Threshold   (pounds per day)  Emission Threshold   (pounds per day)   Construction Operation  Particulate Matter (PM10) 100 100  Particulate Matter (PM2.5) 55 55  Oxides of Nitrogen (NOX) 250 250  Oxides of Sulfur (SOX) 250 250  Carbon Monoxide (CO) 550 550  Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 75 75  Source: SDAPCD Rules 20.2 and 20.3; SCAQMD 2019    Construction   Project construction would result in emissions of criteria pollutants and O3 precursors during site  preparation, excavation, material hauling, light grading, structure construction, facilities installation,  demolition of existing structures, and paving. Emissions would include those associated with equipment  operation and earth movement at the site, the transport of construction materials and equipment to the  site, and worker vehicles traveling to and from the site. Generation of these emissions would be  temporary.   Criteria pollutant and ozone precursor emissions from Project construction were assessed using the  California Emissions Estimator Model (CalEEMod), Version 2020.4.0. CalEEMod is a computer model  developed by SCAQMD with the input of several air quality management and pollution control districts  to estimate criteria air pollutant emissions from various urban land uses. Construction input data for  CalEEMod include but are not limited to: (1) the anticipated start and finish dates of construction  activity, (2) inventories of construction equipment to be used, (3) areas to be excavated and graded, and  (4) volumes of materials to be exported from and imported to the Project area. This analysis assesses  maximum daily emissions from the individual construction activities listed above. Project excavation is  estimated to require 1,500 CY of export of excavated material. Construction emission calculations  presented herein assume the implementation of standard dust control best management practices  (BMPs), including watering two times daily during grading, ensuring that all exposed surfaces maintain a  minimum soil moisture of 12 percent, and limiting vehicle speeds on unpaved roads to 15 miles per hour  (mph). A complete listing of the assumptions used in the analysis and model output is provided in  Appendix A.   The Project’s estimated maximum daily emissions are shown in Table 2, Estimated Maximum Daily  Construction Emissions. Maximum emissions would occur during structure construction in 2023.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  13  Table 2  ESTIMATED MAXIMUM DAILY CONSTRUCTION EMISSIONS  Phase PM10* PM2.5* NOX* SOX* CO* VOCs*  Site Preparation – 2023  <0.5 <0.5 1 <0.5 1 <0.5  Excavation – 2023  <0.5 <0.5 7 <0.5 9 1  Material Hauling – 2023  <0.5 <0.5 3 <0.5 1 <0.5  Light Grading – 2023  <0.5 <0.5 1 <0.5 1 <0.5  Structure Construction – 2023 1 1 18 <0.5 17 2  Structure Construction – 2024 1 1 17 <0.5 17 2  Facilities Installation – 2024 <0.5 <0.5 4 <0.5 4 <0.5  Demolition – 2024  <0.5 <0.5 7 <0.5 9 1  Paving – 2024  <0.5 <0.5 3 <0.5 4 <0.5  Maximum Daily Emissions 1 1 18 <0.5 17 2  SDAPCD Regional Thresholds 100 55 250 250 550 75  Significant Impact? No No No No No No  CalEEMod outputs provided in Appendix A.  * Pollutant Emissions (pounds per day)  VOCs = volatile organic compounds; NOX = oxides of nitrogen; CO = carbon monoxide; SOX = oxides of sulfur;   PM10 = particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter; PM2.5 = particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter    As shown in Table 2, criteria pollutant and ozone precursor emissions would not exceed the respective  screening thresholds. Therefore, construction of the Project would not result in a cumulatively  considerable net increase of any criteria pollutant, contribute substantially to a project air quality  violation, or have an adverse effect on human health. In addition, actual emissions could be less than  those forecasted due to the conservative nature of the assumptions incorporated into the CalEEMod  program regarding phasing. If construction is delayed or occurs over a longer time period, emissions  could be reduced because of (1) a more modern and cleaner‐burning construction equipment fleet mix  and/or (2) a less intensive buildout schedule (i.e., fewer daily emissions occurring over a longer time  interval). As such, construction period impacts would be less than significant.   Operations  The Project’s operational emissions of criteria pollutants and O3 precursors were estimated using  CalEEMod. Operational sources of emissions considered in the model for air pollutant emissions include  area sources, mobile sources, energy sources, and stationary sources. Area sources typically involve  consumer products, architectural coatings, and landscaping equipment. Mobile sources for the Project  would include a daily maintenance trip to and from the site. Air pollutant emissions associated with  energy sources are generally related to the on‐site combustion of natural gas; the Project would not  involve the use of natural gas. Stationary sources for the Project would include one back generator  assumed to be tested for 15 minutes once per month. A complete listing of the assumptions used in the  analysis and model output is provided in Appendix A.  The Project’s estimated maximum daily operational emissions are shown in Table 3, Maximum Daily  Operational Emissions.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  14  Table 3  MAXIMUM DAILY OPERATIONAL EMISSIONS  Source PM10* PM2.5* NOX* SOX* CO* VOCs*  Area 0 0 0 0 <0.5 <0.5  Energy 0 0 0 <0.5 0 0  Mobile <0.5 <0.5 <0.5 <0.5 <0.5 <0.5  Stationary  <0.5 <0.5 <0.5 <0.5 <0.5 <0.5  Maximum Daily Emissions <0.5 <0.5 <0.5 <0.5 <0.5 <0.5  SDAPCD Regional Thresholds 100 55 250 250 550 75  Significant Impact? No No No No No No  CalEEMod outputs provided in Appendix A.  * Pollutant Emissions (pounds per day)  VOCs = volatile organic compounds; NOX = oxides of nitrogen; CO = carbon monoxide; SOX = oxides of sulfur;   PM10 = particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter; PM2.5 = particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter    As shown in Table 3, criteria pollutant and ozone precursor emissions would not exceed the respective  screening thresholds. Therefore, operation of the Project would not result in a cumulatively  considerable net increase of any criteria pollutant, contribute substantially to a project air quality  violation, or have an adverse effect on human health. As such, operational impacts would be less than  significant.   c) Expose sensitive receptors to substantial pollutant concentrations?  Less Than Significant Impact. Sensitive receptors (i.e., children, senior citizens, and acutely or  chronically ill people) are more susceptible to the effects of air pollution than the general population.  Land uses considered sensitive uses are those that accommodate sensitive receptors on a regular basis  and for extended periods of time and typically include residences, schools, playgrounds, childcare  centers, hospitals, convalescent homes, and retirement homes. The nearest sensitive receptor land use  to the Project site are the single‐family residential properties located immediately east of the Project  site.   Construction   Construction activities would result in short‐term, Project‐generated emissions of diesel particulate  matter (DPM) from the exhaust of off‐road, heavy‐duty diesel equipment used for the Project’s various  construction activities. CARB identified DPM as a toxic air contaminant (TAC) in 1998. The dose to which  receptors are exposed is the primary factor used to determine health risk. Dose is a function of the  concentration of a substance or substances in the environment and the duration of exposure to the  substance. Thus, the risks estimated for a maximally exposed individual (MEI) are higher if a fixed  exposure occurs over a longer time period. According to the Office of Environmental Health Hazard  Assessment, health risk assessments, which determine the exposure of sensitive receptors to TAC  emissions, should be based on a 30‐year exposure period; however, such assessments should be limited  to the period/duration of activities associated with the Project.  The residences to the east of the Project site would have the potential to be exposed to DPM emissions;  however, as presented above in Table 2, maximum daily particulate emissions, which include DPM, are  estimated at one pound per day for both PM10 and PM2.5, which are well below their respective SDAPCD  screening‐level thresholds of 100 pounds per day and 55 pounds per day. Additionally, the construction  period would be relatively short, especially when compared to 30‐year exposure duration period that  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  15  typically requires a full health risk assessment. Combined with the highly dispersive properties of DPM,  construction‐related emissions of TACs would not expose sensitive receptors to substantial emissions of  TACs. Construction impacts to sensitive receptors would be less than significant.  Operations   With regard to long‐term operations, the CARB Air Quality and Land Use Handbook (CARB 2005) lists  prominent air pollution sources as high traffic freeways and roads; distribution centers; rail yards; ports;  refineries; chrome plating facilities; dry cleaners; and large gas dispensing facilities. The Project would  replace an existing lift station and would not include the types of uses that have been identified as  sources of air pollution by CARB. Further, as shown above in Table 3, particulate matter emissions  during Project operations would be well below SDAPCD screening level thresholds of 100 pounds per  day for PM10 and 55 pounds per day for PM2.5. In addition, the Project would not place sensitive  receptors within the CARB siting distances of the listed air pollutant sources. Operational impacts to  sensitive receptors would be less than significant.  d) Result in other emissions (such as those leading to odors) adversely affecting a substantial number  of people?  Less Than Significant Impact. During the Project’s construction period, emission‐related odors from  construction equipment/vehicles (particularly diesel exhaust) may occur temporarily in the immediately  surrounding area. Specifically, construction equipment and vehicles could intermittently emit diesel  exhaust perceptible by nearby receptors along roadways (i.e., from transport vehicles) and near the  Project site during construction. These odors would not affect a substantial number of people, as  construction activities (including vehicle trips) would be minor in duration and extent. Diesel‐powered  construction equipment and vehicles would also be required to comply with the State Airborne Toxic  Control Measure standards for diesel particulate matter emissions. Operationally, the lift station  facilities would be enclosed, which would limit off‐site odor impacts. Although the pump room would be  ventilated, there would be no venting of wastewater. The Project would also not represent a substantial  change from existing conditions in regard to potential operational odors. As such, the Project would not  create odors that would affect a substantial number of people and associated potential impacts would  be less than significant.   IV. BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or  through habitat modifications, on any species identified  as a candidate, sensitive, or special status species in local  or regional plans, policies, or regulations, or by the  California Department of Fish and Wildlife or U.S. Fish and  Wildlife Service?  ☐ ☒ ☐ ☐  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  16    Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  b) Have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian habitat  or other sensitive natural community identified in local or  regional plans, policies, regulations, or by the California  Department of Fish and Wildlife or US Fish and Wildlife  Service?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  c) Have a substantial adverse effect on state or federally  protected wetlands (including, but not limited to, marsh,  vernal pool, coastal, etc.) through direct removal, filling,  hydrological interruption, or other means?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  d) Interfere substantially with the movement of any native  resident or migratory fish or wildlife species or with  established native resident or migratory wildlife corridors,  or impede the use of native wildlife nursery sites?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  e) Conflict with any local policies or ordinances protecting  biological resources, such as a tree preservation policy or  ordinance?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  f) Conflict with the provisions of an adopted Habitat  Conservation Plan, Natural Community Conservation  Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat  conservation plan?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    The following discussion is based on the Biological Assessment prepared for the Project by HELIX  Environmental Planning, Inc. (HELIX 2021a) and included as Appendix B to this IS. To determine the  presence of biological resources within the Project study area, defined as the Project boundary (refer to  Figure 2) plus a 100‐foot buffer, HELIX performed a general biological survey and two rare plant surveys.  Prior to conducting the field surveys, HELIX conducted a thorough review of relevant maps, databases,  and literature pertaining to biological resources know to occur within the study area. Special‐status  species and habitat databases reviewed included the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) species  records, California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) California Natural Diversity Database  (CNDDB), Calflora database, SanBIOS, and California Native Plant Society (CNPS) Inventory of Rare and  Endangered Plants.   a) Have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or through habitat modifications, on any species  identified as a candidate, sensitive, or special status species in local or regional plans, policies or  regulations, or by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service?  Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated. The following discussion includes an analysis of  special status plant species and animal species.  Special Status Plant Species Special status plant species have been afforded special‐status and/or recognition by the USFWS and/or  CDFW. They may also be included in the CNPS’ Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants. Their status is  often based on one or more of three distributional attributes: geographic range, habitat specificity,  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  17  and/or population size. Sensitive species are those considered unusual or limited in that they are:  (1) only found in the region; (2) a local representative of a species or association of species not  otherwise found in the region; or (3) severely depleted within their ranges or within the region. One  sensitive plant species was observed within the study area, including immediately adjacent to the  Project footprint: San Diego ambrosia (Ambrosia pumila; refer to Figure 4, Vegetation Communities and  Sensitive Resources). No additional sensitive plant species have a potential to occur based on geographic  range, elevation range, and/or lack of suitable habitat in the study area.   Approximately 10 individual San Diego ambrosia occur within the fence line separating the Project  footprint from the adjacent open space. These individuals are not expected to be affected by Project  implementation due to their location outside of the Project’s planned work areas; however, they could  be inadvertently affected during construction if construction happens to extend outside of the  anticipated work areas and encroach upon these individuals. Impacts are therefore considered  potentially significant and mitigation measure MM‐BIO‐1 would be required.  Special Status Animal Species Special status animal species include those that have been afforded special‐status and/or recognition by  the USFWS and/or CDFW. In general, the principal reason an individual taxon (species or subspecies) is  given such recognition is the documented or perceived decline or limitations of its population size or  geographical extent and/or distribution, resulting in most cases from habitat loss.   One special‐status animal species was observed within or adjacent to the study area: Cooper’s hawk  (Accipiter cooperii). The one individual was detected within suitable nesting trees within the abandoned  portion of Cottonwood Golf Club west of the Project footprint. One additional sensitive animal species  has a high potential to occur: coastal California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica). Coastal  California gnatcatcher, which is federally threatened and a CDFW Species of Special Concern, has been  reported within coastal sage scrub immediately south of the Project footprint. Although the proposed  critical habitat for the Hermes copper butterfly occurs south of the Project footprint, the Project  footprint and immediate surrounding areas lack suitable habitat for this species; therefore, Hermes  copper butterfly is not expected to be present at the Project site. No other special status species have a  high potential to occur based on geographic range, elevation range, and/or lack of suitable habitat in the  study area.  Trees and shrubs both within and adjacent to the study area could provide suitable nesting habitat for  numerous bird species known to the region. Three raptor species were observed during the general  biological survey: Cooper’s hawk, red‐tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), and red‐shouldered hawk (Buteo  lineatus). Additionally, several other species have the potential to forage in the Project vicinity. The  study area provides moderate‐quality raptor habitat due to the disturbed nature of the former  recreational area, residential, and transportation uses. Extensive raptor foraging habitat occurs off‐site  in the Project vicinity within undeveloped areas to the north of the Project.  Direct impacts to the coastal California gnatcatcher are not expected as no direct impacts would occur  to suitable habitat for this species; however, this species has the potential to nest off‐site, within  500 feet of Project construction, and therefore has the potential to be subject to significant noise‐ related indirect impacts. Such impacts would be significant if breeding individuals become displaced  from their nests and fail to breed. Mitigation measure MM‐BIO‐2 would therefore be required to avoid  potentially significant impacts.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  18  Direct (from habitat removal) and/or noise‐related indirect impacts to Cooper’s hawk and other  birds/raptors protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) could occur from Project  construction during the general bird breeding season (January 15 to August 31) due to the presence of  suitable nesting habitat. Mitigation measure MM‐BIO‐3 would therefore be required to avoid potentially  significant impacts.   Mitigation The following mitigation measures are required to reduce potential impacts to San Diego ambrosia,  coastal California gnatcatcher, Cooper’s hawk, and other birds/raptors protected under the MBTA to  less‐than‐significant levels.   MM‐BIO‐1  Biological Construction Monitoring. Prior to vegetation clearing, grading, and/or  construction activities, aA qualified biologist shall conduct a pre‐construction  environmental training session for construction personnel to inform them of the  sensitive biological resources, including special‐status species, in the local area and the  avoidance measures in place to remain in compliance. The biologist shall periodically  monitor construction activities to help ensure that Project activities occur within the  approved Project limits and in compliance with required environmental conditions. The  biologist shall also identify and flag San Diego ambrosia occurring within and/or near the  Project work area for avoidance. The biologist shall oversee the installation of  appropriate fencing and/or flagging to delineate the limits of construction and the  construction staging area for protection of identified sensitive resources outside the  construction areas. The fencing shall be checked weekly to ensure that fenced  construction limits are not exceeded. The fencing shall be removed upon completion of  construction activities. The construction staging area shall be located a minimum of  100 feet from the identified San Diego ambrosia individuals. Fueling of equipment shall  occur in designated fueling zones within the construction staging areas. All equipment  used within the approved construction limits shall be maintained to minimize and  control fluid and grease leaks. Provisions to contain and clean up unintentional fuel, oil,  fluid and grease leaks/spills shall be in place prior to construction.  MM‐BIO‐2 Coastal California Gnatcatcher Pre‐Construction Surveys and Noise Attenuation. The  following Project requirements regarding the coastal California gnatcatcher shall be  shown on the construction plans:  No clearing, grubbing, grading, or other construction activities shall occur from  February 15 to August 30, the breeding season of the coastal California gnatcatcher,  until the following requirements have been met to the satisfaction of OWD:  (A) Six (6) weeks prior to vegetation clearing, grading and/or construction activities that  are scheduled to occur between February 15 and August 30, Aa qualified biologist  (possessing a valid Federal Endangered Species Act Section 10(a)(1)(A) Recovery  Permit) shall commence focused surveys in accordance with USFWS protocols to  determine the presence or absence of coastal California gnatcatcher.  Documentation of the survey results shall be provided to OWD and USFWS within  45 days of completing the final survey, as required pursuant to Federal Endangered  Species Act Section 10(a)(1)(A). If the survey results are negative, then no further  GF W il d w i n d D r P a r F o u r D r Par Four Dr Figure 4 Vegetation Communities and Sensitive Resources I:\PROJECTS\O\OtayWaterDistrict_00623\OWD-06.06_Cottonwood\Map\IS\Fig4_Vegetation.mxd OWD-06.06 7/30/2021 -DY Source: Aerial (SanGIS, 2019)K Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement 0 75 Feet Project Site 100 ft Buffer Sensitive Resources GF Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) San Diego Ambrosia (Ambrosia pumila) San Diego Ambrosia USFWS Critical Habitat Hermes Copper Butterfly (Proposed, 2020) Coastal California Gnatcatcher (Final, 2007) San Diego Ambrosia (Final, 2010) Vegetation Diegan Coastal Sage Scrub Disturbed Habitat Urban/Developed This page intentionally left blank  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  19  mitigation for coastal California gnatcatcher is necessary and vegetation clearing can  occur at any time in the year following the survey. If surveyed habitat is determined  to be occupied by coastal California gnatcatcher, then the following measures shall  be implemented: survey those suitable habitat areas that would be subject to  construction noise levels exceeding 60 decibels (dBA) hourly average for the  presence of coastal California gnatcatcher. A single pre‐construction survey for the  coastal California gnatcatcher shall be conducted within three days prior to the  commencement of any construction. If gnatcatchers are present, then the following  conditions must be met:   (1) Coastal sage scrub/gnatcatcher habitat shall not be removed during the  gnatcatcher breeding season (Beginning on February 15 and ending on through  August 30). Work that has commenced prior to the breeding season shall be  allowed to continue without interruption. If gnatcatchers move into an area  within 500 feet of ongoing construction noise levels and attempt to nest, then it  can be deduced that the noise is not great enough to discourage gnatcatcher  nesting activities. If work begins prior to the breeding season, the contractor(s)  should maintain continuous construction activities adjacent to coastal sage  scrub that falls within 500 feet, until the work is completed. However, if  clearing, grading and/or construction activities are scheduled to begin during  the gnatcatcher breeding season, then updated focused surveys are necessary  as defined above. In addition, if these activities are initiated prior to, and extend  into, the breeding season, but they cease for any period of time and the  contractor wishes to restart work within the breeding season window, then  updated focused surveys are also necessary. If these surveys indicate no nesting  birds occur within the coastal sage scrub that falls within 500 feet of the  proposed work, then the adjacent construction activities shall be allowed to  commence. However, if the birds are observed nesting within these areas, then  the adjacent construction activities shall be postponed until all nesting has  ceased., no clearing, grubbing, or grading of occupied gnatcatcher habitat shall  be permitted. Areas restricted from such activities shall be staked or fenced  under the supervision of a qualified biologist; and  (2) Noise monitoring shall be conducted if construction activities are scheduled  during the gnatcatcher breeding season; if the construction‐related noise levels  would exceed 60 dBA (i.e., the noise threshold suggested by USFWS for indirect  impacts to gnatcatcher), or ambient noise level if it already exceeds 60 dBA; and  if gnatcatchers are found within 500 feet of the noise source. Beginning on  February 15 and ending on August 30, no construction activities shall occur  within any portion of the site where construction activities would result in noise  levels exceeding 60 dBA hourly average at the edge of occupied gnatcatcher  habitat. An analysis showing that noise generated by construction activities  would not exceed 60 dBA hourly average at the edge of occupied habitat must  be completed by a qualified acoustician (possessing current noise engineer  license of registration with monitoring noise level experience with listed animal  species) and approved by OWD at least two weeks prior to the commencement  of construction activities. Construction activities that generate noise levels over  60 dBA may be permitted within 300 feet of occupied habitat if methods are  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  20  employed that reduce the noise levels to below 60 dBA at the boundary of  occupied habitat (e.g., temporary noise attenuation barriers or use of  alternative equipment). During construction activities, monitoring of noise  levels shall be conducted by a noise monitor with the help of the biologist to  ensure that a noise level of 60 dBA at the boundary of occupied habitat is not  exceeded at least twice weekly on varying days, or more frequently depending  on the construction activity. If the noise attenuation techniques implemented  are determined to be inadequate by the qualified acoustician or biologist, then  the associated construction activities shall cease until such time that adequate  noise attenuation is achieved or until the end of the breeding season  (August 16). Documentation of the noise monitoring results shall be provided to  OWD and USFWS within 45 days of completing the final noise monitoring event.  Given that chain link fencing currently separates the proposed Project from  potential coastal California gnatcatcher habitat, no additional fencing is  required. Prior to the commencement of construction activities during the  breeding season, areas restricted from such activities shall be staked or fenced  under the supervision of a qualified biologist; or  (3) At least two weeks prior to the commencement of construction activities, under  the direction of a qualified acoustician, noise attenuation measures (e.g., berms,  walls) shall be implemented to ensure that noise levels resulting from  construction activities will not exceed 60 dBA hourly average at the edge of  habitat occupied by the coastal California gnatcatcher. Concurrent with the  commencement of construction activities and the construction of necessary  noise attenuation facilities, noise monitoring* shall be conducted at the edge of  the occupied habitat area to ensure that noise levels do not exceed 60 dBA  hourly average. If the noise attenuation techniques implemented are  determined to inadequate by the qualified acoustician or biologist, then the  associated construction activities shall cease until such time that adequate noise  attenuation is achieved or until the end of the breeding season (August 16).   *Construction noise monitoring shall continue to be monitored at least twice weekly  on varying days, or more frequently depending on the construction activity, to verify  that noise levels at the edge of occupied habitat are maintained below 60 dBA  hourly average or to the ambient noise level if it already exceeds 60 dBA hourly  average. If not, other measures shall be implemented in consultation with the  biologist and OWD, as necessary, to reduce noise levels to below 60 dBA hourly  average, or to the ambient noise level if it already exceeds 60 dBA hourly average.  Such measures may include, but are not limited to, limitations on the placement of  construction equipment and the simultaneous use of equipment.   (B) If coastal California gnatcatcher are not detected during the pre‐construction  survey, the qualified biologist shall submit substantial evidence to OWD and  applicable resource agencies, which demonstrates whether or not mitigation  measure such as noise walls are necessary between February 15 and August 30 as  follows:   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  21  (1) If this evidence indicated the potential is high for coastal California gnatcatcher  to be present based on historical records or site conditions, then condition  A(3)shall be adhered to as specified above.   (2) If this evidence concludes that no impacts to this species are anticipated, no  mitigation measures would be necessary.  MM‐BIO‐3 Nesting Bird Pre‐Construction Surveys and Avoidance. Trimming, grubbing, and  clearing of vegetation shall be avoided during the general avian breeding season  (January 15 to July 15 for raptors; February 15 to August 31 for other avian species) to  the extent feasible. If trimming, grubbing, or clearing of vegetation is proposed to occur  during the general avian breeding season, a pre‐construction survey shall be conducted  by a qualified biologist no more than seven days prior to vegetation clearing to  determine if active bird nests are present in the affected areas. If there are no nesting  birds (includes nest building or other breeding/nesting behavior) within this area,  trimming, grubbing, and clearing of vegetation shall be allowed to proceed. If active bird  nests are confirmed to be present during the pre‐construction survey, a buffer zone will  be determined and established by the biologist. Construction activities shall avoid any  active nests until a qualified biologist has verified that the young have fledged, or the  nest has otherwise become inactive.  b) Have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian habitat or other sensitive natural community  identified in local or regional plans, policies or regulations, or by the California Department of Fish  and Wildlife or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service?  No Impact. Sensitive vegetation communities/habitat types are defined as land that supports unique  vegetation communities or the habitats of rare species or subspecies of animals or plants as defined by  Section 15380 of the State CEQA Guidelines. CDFW evaluates the rarity of natural communities using the  NatureServe’s Heritage Methodology (Faber‐Langendoen et al. 2012), in which communities are given a  G (global) and S (State) rank based on their degree of imperilment (as measured by rarity, trends, and  threats). Communities are assigned an overall rank of 1 through 5, with 1 being considered very rare and  threatened, and 5 being considered demonstrably secure. Communities with a Rarity Ranking of S1  (critically imperiled), S2 (imperiled), or S3 (vulnerable) are considered sensitive by the CDFW.  The Project study area supports three vegetation communities: Diegan coastal sage scrub, disturbed  habitat, and urban/developed land (refer to Figure 4 of Appendix B). Of these, Diegan coastal sage scrub  is considered a sensitive vegetation community/habitat type. This vegetation community occurs entirely  outside of the Project impact footprint and would not be affected by implementation of the Project. As  such, no impacts to sensitive vegetation communities/habitat types would occur.   c) Have a substantial adverse effect on state or federally protected wetlands (including, but not limited  to, marsh, vernal pool, coastal, etc.) through direct removal, filling, hydrological interruption, or  other means?   No Impact. There are no jurisdictional wetlands or waterways within or adjacent to the Project  footprint; therefore, the Project would not result in impacts to such resources.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  22  d) Interfere substantially with the movement of any native resident or migratory fish or wildlife species  or with established native resident or migratory wildlife corridors, or impede the use of native  wildlife nursery sites?  Less Than Significant Impact. Wildlife corridors connect otherwise isolated pieces of habitat and allow  movement or dispersal of plants and animals. Wildlife corridors can be local or regional in scale and may  function in different ways, depending on species and time of year. Wildlife corridors represent areas  where wildlife movement is concentrated due to natural or manufactured constraints. Local corridors  provide access to resources such as food, water, and shelter. Animals can use these corridors, such as  hillsides and tributary drainages to main drainages, to travel among different habitats (i.e., riparian and  upland habitats). Some animals require riparian habitat for breeding and upland habitat for burrowing.  Regional corridors provide these functions and also link two or more large areas of open space. Regional  corridors also provide avenues for wildlife dispersal, migration, and contact between otherwise distinct  populations.   The Project site by itself does not represent, nor does it contribute to, a wildlife corridor, linkage, or  wildlife nursery site. The Project is sited within existing disturbed and developed land that is subject to  maintenance. The replacement of the lift station would not act as a major impediment to wildlife  movement, including access to nursery sites, foraging habitat, breeding habitat, water sources, or other  areas necessary for their life history. Higher quality habitat that functions as a wildlife movement  corridor occurs south of the Project footprint. The Project avoids, and is set back from, the habitat, with  the closest Project elements separated from the habitat by existing barriers (i.e., fences). As the Project  developments have been sited within existing disturbed and developed areas, the potential impact on  wildlife movement and nursery sites would be less than significant.  e) Conflict with any local policies or ordinances protecting biological resources, such as a tree  preservation policy or ordinance?  No Impact. No local policies or ordinances pertaining to biological resources are applicable to the  Project. The Project would primarily occur within a disturbed area that includes an existing lift station.  No impact or conflict would occur.  f) Conflict with the provisions of an adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Community  Conservation Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat conservation plan?  No Impact. OWD is not a participating entity in any adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural  Conservation Community Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat conservation plan;  therefore, no impacts would occur to such plans. No conflict with an adopted plan would occur. Further,  as discussed above, with mitigation the Project would not result in significant impacts to biological  resources that may be protected under such plans.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  23  V. CULTURAL RESOURCES   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a  historical resource pursuant to §15064.5? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  b) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of  an archaeological resource pursuant to §15064.5? ☐ ☒ ☐ ☐  c) Disturb any human remains, including those interred  outside of dedicated cemeteries? ☐ ☒ ☐ ☐    The following discussion is based on the Cultural Resources Study prepared for the Project by HELIX  (HELIX 2021b) and included as Appendix C to this IS. The Cultural Resources Study included a records  search of the Project area and a half‐mile radius from the South Coastal Information Center (SCIC), a  review of previously conducted studies, a Sacred Lands File search from the NAHC, a review of historic  maps and photographs, and a field visit by a HELIX archaeologist and a Native American monitor. The  results and conclusions of the study are summarized herein.   a) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a historical resource pursuant to §15064.5?  No Impact. The records search results indicated that eight cultural resources have been previously  identified within a half‐mile radius of the Project site. One of the resources, P‐37‐039116, which is the  Cottonwood Golf Club, contains the Project site. The Cottonwood Golf Club consists of two 18‐hole golf  courses, associated structures, landscaping, and infrastructure, and was first recorded as a resource in  2019. Construction of the Cottonwood Golf Club began in 1962 with the Lakes Course, formerly known  as the Monte Vista Course, on the western side of the property and the Ivanhoe Course on the eastern  side; this included channeling the Sweetwater River within the property. The clubhouse, parking lot,  maintenance facility, and the Ivanhoe Course were completed by 1964, and the Lakes Course was  completed by 1968. Between 1989 and 1993, the Lakes Course was extended to the southwest. This  resource was documented and evaluated as part of a different project and was found to be not eligible  for the California Register of Historical Resources (CRHR) or San Diego County Local Register of Historic  Resources (Reinicke and Mengers 2020). As such, the Project would not cause a substantial adverse  change in the significance of a historical resource, and no impacts would occur.   b) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of an archaeological resource pursuant to  §15064.5?  Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated. As discussed above in Item V(a), one previously  recorded resource, the Cottonwood Golf Club, overlaps the Project site. No archaeological resources  have been recorded or are known to exist within the Project site or a half‐mile radius and no resources  were observed during the field visit. However, during the field visit, the Native American monitor stated  that due of the sensitivity of the region surrounding the Sweetwater River, and because the existing lift  station and sewer line may not have been monitored at the time of construction, that the Jamul Indian  Village requests cultural resource monitoring to be performed during ground‐disturbance activities. In  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  24  addition, the NAHC indicated that the results of the Sacred Lands File search conducted for the Project  were positive and that the Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, the Kwaaymii Laguna Band of  Mission Indians, and the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians should be contacted for more information. A  list of tribal contacts from whom additional information can be solicited was provided with the NAHC’s  response–letters were sent to these contacts on March 23, 2021. To date, one response has been  received: the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians stated that the area containing the Project site has  cultural significance or ties to Viejas. Viejas requested that a Kumeyaay Native American monitor be on  site for ground‐disturbing activities and to be informed of any discoveries found during construction.  Therefore, though not anticipated, the Project could cause a substantial adverse change in the  significance of unknown archaeological resources during ground‐disturbing activities, and impacts are  considered potentially significant. Mitigation measures MM‐CUL‐1 would be required.   Mitigation The following mitigation measure is required to reduce potential impacts to archaeological resources to  a less‐than‐significant level.   MM‐CUL‐1 Cultural Resources Monitoring. An archaeological and Native American monitoring  program shall be implemented for the Project to ensure no inadvertent impacts occur to  unknown subsurface cultural resources. The monitoring program shall include  attendance by the archaeologist and a Kumeyaay Native American monitor at a  preconstruction meeting with the construction contractor and the presence of  archaeological and Native American monitors during initial ground‐disturbing activities.  Both archaeological and Native American monitors shall have the authority to  temporarily halt or redirect grading and other ground‐disturbing activity in the event  that cultural resources are encountered. If significant cultural material is encountered,  the monitors shall coordinate with OWD staff to develop and implement appropriate  mitigation measures. If the excavations for the Project are determined to be within  disturbed soils with little potential for intact subsurface cultural material to be present,  archaeological monitoring would be reduced or ceased. The Native American monitor  shall determine the extent of their presence during soil‐disturbing activities. If the  Native American monitor determines that their presence is not warranted fulltime, their  schedule shall be adjusted accordingly.  c) Disturb any human remains, including those interred outside of dedicated cemeteries?  Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated. No human remains are known to exist in the Project  area and no impacts to human remains are anticipated to occur as a result of the Project; however, due  to the cultural sensitivity of the area, the potential exists to encounter and disturb unknown human  remains during ground‐disturbing activities. As such, impacts are considered potentially significant and  mitigation measure MM‐CUL‐2 would be required.   Mitigation The following mitigation measure is required to reduce potential impacts to human remains to a less‐ than‐significant level.   MM‐CUL‐2  Procedure for Unanticipated Discovery of Human Remains. If human remains are  encountered, Public Resources Code Section 5097.98 and California Health and Safety  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  25  Code Section 7050.5 will be followed. If human remains are encountered no further  disturbance shall occur until the County Coroner has made the necessary findings as to  origin. Further, pursuant to California Public Resources Code Section 5097.98(b),  remains shall be left in place and free from disturbance until a final decision as to the  treatment and disposition has been made. If the County Coroner determines the  remains to be Native American, the coroner shall contact the NAHC within 24 hours.  Subsequently, the NAHC shall identify the person or persons it believes to be the “most  likely descendant.” The most likely descendant shall then make recommendations and  engage in consultations concerning the treatment of the remains as provided in Public  Resources Code Section 5097.98.  VI. ENERGY   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Result in potentially significant environmental impact  due to wasteful, inefficient, or unnecessary consumption  of energy resources, during Project construction or  operation?   ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Conflict with or obstruct a state or local plan for  renewable energy or energy efficiency?   ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    a) Result in potentially significant environmental impact due to wasteful, inefficient, or unnecessary  consumption of energy resources, during Project construction or operation?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project would consume energy during construction and operation.  Energy used for Project construction would primarily consist of petroleum‐based fuels in the forms of  gasoline and diesel. Heavy‐duty off‐road construction equipment, haul trucks delivering and removing  construction materials, and worker commute vehicles would consume these fuels. Project‐related  consumption of such energy resources for construction would be temporary, typical for this type of  construction, and cease upon the completion of construction. In addition, mobile equipment energy  usage during construction would be minimized as the Project would comply with the CARB’s idling  regulations, which restrict idling diesel vehicles and equipment to five minutes.  During Project operations, the lift station would use electricity provided by an existing on‐site  transformer, which would not represent a new use of energy resources. Additional minor sources of  operational energy consumption would include a diesel‐powered emergency generator that would be  used for backup power in the instance of transformer failure, and occasional maintenance worker trips.  Overall, the use of energy would be limited to necessary lift station operations. The Project would  therefore not use energy in a wasteful, inefficient, or unnecessary manner, and impacts would be less  than significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  26  b) Conflict with or obstruct a state or local plan for renewable energy or energy efficiency?  No Impact. The Project would be constructed and operated in accordance with applicable regulations,  including, but not limited to, CARB regulations (as mentioned in Item VI[a]). Construction equipment and  lift station operation equipment would be maintained to allow for continuous energy‐efficient  operations. Accordingly, the Project would not conflict with or obstruct plans for renewable energy or  energy efficiency, and no impact would occur.   VII. GEOLOGY AND SOILS   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Directly or indirectly cause potential substantial adverse  effects, including the risk of loss, injury, or death  involving:       i. Rupture of a known earthquake fault, as delineated  on the most recent Alquist‐Priolo Earthquake Fault  Zoning Map issued by the State Geologist for the area  or based on other substantial evidence of a known  fault? Refer to Division of Mines and Geology Special  Publication 42.  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  ii. Strong seismic ground shaking? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  iii. Seismic‐related ground failure, including  liquefaction? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  iv. Landslides? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Result in substantial soil erosion or the loss of topsoil? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  c) Be located on a geologic unit or soil that is unstable, or  that would become unstable as a result of the Project,  and potentially result in on‐ or off‐site landslide, lateral  spreading, subsidence, liquefaction or collapse?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  d) Be located on expansive soil, as defined in Table 18‐1‐B of  the Uniform Building Code (1994), creating substantial  direct or indirect risks to life or property?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  e) Have soils incapable of adequately supporting the use of  septic tanks or alternative waste water disposal systems  where sewers are not available for the disposal of waste  water?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  f) Directly or indirectly destroy a unique paleontological  resource or site or unique geologic feature?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐    a) Directly or indirectly cause potential substantial adverse effects, including the risk of loss, injury, or  death involving:  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  27  i. Rupture of a known earthquake fault, as delineated on the most recent Alquist‐Priolo  Earthquake Fault Zoning Map issued by the State Geologist for the area or based on other  substantial evidence of a known fault? Refer to Division of Mines and Geology Special  Publication 42?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project site is not located within a County Special Study Zone fault, an  earthquake fault zone identified by the California Geological Survey, or an established Alquist‐Priolo  Earthquake Fault Zone (California Department of Conservation 2015). The closest fault zone to the  Project site is the La Nacion fault zone, located approximately 8.5 miles southwest of the Project site. At  this distance, the potential for fault rupture at the Project site is minimal. Impacts are therefore  considered less than significant.   ii. Strong seismic ground shaking?  Less Than Significant Impact. Although the Project site is not located within a known earthquake fault  zone (as discussed above in Item VII(a.i), it is located within Seismic Zone 4, which is the defined as the  seismic zone with the most potential for seismic activity; therefore, the Project site, as with the entire  County and most of southern California, is subject to seismic ground shaking (County 2011). An  earthquake along known active faults in the region could cause ground shaking that could result in  substantial adverse effects to the Project facilities, depending on factors such as event duration, motion  frequency, and underlying soil/geologic conditions. The Project facilities, however, would be designed  and constructed in conformance with applicable standards and guidelines, such as the “Greenbook”  Standard Specifications for Public Work Construction, the CBC, and the IBC. These standards typically  involve incorporating seismic factors into facility design, through efforts such as remedial grading  (e.g., removal and/or reconditioning unsuitable soils), appropriate slope design and drainage, and use of  properly engineered fill. Compliance with these standards and guidelines would reduce the potential  impacts of seismic ground shaking to a less‐than‐significant level.  iii. Seismic‐related ground failure, including liquefaction?  Less Than Significant Impact. Liquefaction and related effects such as dynamic settlement can be  caused by seismic ground shaking. Loose (cohesionless), saturated, and granular (low clay/silt content)  soils with relative densities of less than approximately 70 percent are the most susceptible to these  effects. Liquefaction results in a rapid pore‐water pressure increase and a corresponding loss of shear  strength, with affected soils behaving as a viscous liquid. Surface and subsurface manifestations from  these events can include loss of support for structures, excessive (dynamic) settlement, the occurrence  of sand boils (i.e., sand and water ejected at the surface), and other effects such as lateral spreading  (horizontal displacement on sloped surfaces as a result of underlying liquefaction).   Loose subsurface soils and near‐surface groundwater is present beneath the Project site, allowing for  the potential for liquefaction; however, as previously noted, the Project would be designed and  constructed in conformance with associated regulatory and industry standards, including applicable  elements of the “Greenbook” Standard Specifications for Public Work Construction, the CBC, and the  IBC. Based on these considerations, potential impacts associated with liquefaction and related hazards  from implementation of the proposed Project would be less than significant.  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  28  iv. Landslides?  Less Than Significant Impact. The occurrence of landslides and other types of slope failures (e.g., rock  falls and mudflows) is influenced by a number of factors, including slope grade, geologic and soil  characteristics, moisture levels, and vegetation cover. Landslides can be triggered by a variety of  potentially destabilizing conditions or events, such as gravity, fires, precipitation, grading, and seismic  activity. According to the County of San Diego General Plan, the Project site is located within an area  identified as having a moderate landslide susceptibility (County 2011); however, the Project site itself  and the immediately surrounding areas are characterized by flat topography and are not considered to  be at substantial risk of landslides. Further, as previously noted, the Project would be designed and  constructed in conformance with associated regulatory and industry standards, including applicable  elements of the “Greenbook” Standard Specifications for Public Work Construction, the CBC, and the  IBC. As such, potential impacts related to landslide hazards from implementation of the Project would  be less than significant.   b) Result in substantial soil erosion or the loss of topsoil?  Less Than Significant Impact. Potential erosion/topsoil impacts would be avoided or reduced below a  level of significance through implementation of an erosion control plan by the contractor during  construction. The erosion control plan would include construction and post‐construction BMPs to  reduce potential effects to surface water quality due to storm water runoff pollution from the  construction site. Such BMPs would include erosion control/stabilizing measures in cleared areas and on  graded slopes (e.g., geotextiles, mats, fiber rolls, soil binders, temporary hydroseeding); sediment  controls (e.g., temporary inlet filters, silt fences, fiber rolls, gravel bags, temporary sediment basins,  check dams, street sweeping, energy dissipaters); and stabilized construction access points  (e.g., temporary gravel or pavement) and sediment stockpiles (e.g., silt fences and tarps). Upon  completion of construction activities, the Project site would be paved, similar to existing conditions, and  would not result in the potential for substantial soil erosion or loss of topsoil. Impacts would be less than  significant.   c) Be located on a geologic unit or soil that is unstable, or that would become unstable as a result of  the Project, and potentially result in on‐ or off‐site landslide, lateral spreading, subsidence,  liquefaction, or collapse?  Less Than Significant Impact. Refer to Item VII(a.iii‐iv) for discussion of impacts related to liquefaction  and landslides. The potential for subsidence and collapse are related to groundwater withdrawal and  the presence of less stable materials, such as alluvium and topsoil. Although shallow groundwater and  potentially unstable materials may be encountered during Project construction activities, conformance  with applicable regulatory standards would result in less than significant impacts related to subsidence  and collapse.  The Project would require excavation for the development of the proposed belowground components.  Excavations typically involve vertical or near vertical walls and can exhibit instability and the potential  for collapse because of loose or unstable soil and geologic materials. Potential excavation instability  hazards would be addressed through required conformance with applicable U.S. Occupational Safety  and Health Administration (OSHA) and California Occupational Safety and Health Administration  (Cal‐OSHA) requirements. These standards include criteria related to factors such as slope limitations  and dimensions; use of appropriate shoring, shielding, and benching to provide stability; and restrictions  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  29  on adjacent uses (e.g., heavy equipment use). Conformance with these regulatory standards would  avoid or reduce potential impacts related to excavation stability to a less‐than‐significant level.  d) Be located on expansive soil, as defined in Table 18‐1‐B of the Uniform Building Code (1994),  creating substantial direct or indirect risks to life or property?  Less Than Significant Impact. Expansive soils are attributable to the water holding capacity of clay  materials. Such behavior can adversely affect structural integrity (including underground facilities)  through shifting of support materials during the shrink‐swell process. If expansive soils are present/  encountered during Project implementation, associated potential impacts would be addressed through  conformance with regulatory/industry standards, including applicable elements of the “Greenbook”  Standard Specifications for Public Work Construction, the CBC, and the IBC. Specifically, this may include  efforts such as removal of expansive soils and replacement with engineered fill. Conformance with the  described regulatory standards would reduce potential impacts related to expansive soils from Project  implementation to a less‐than‐significant level.   e) Have soils incapable of adequately supporting the use of septic tanks or alternative waste water  disposal systems where sewers are not available for the disposal of waste water?  No Impact. The Project does not include septic tanks or alternative wastewater disposal systems, and no  associated impacts would occur.   f) Directly or indirectly destroy a unique paleontological resource or site or unique geologic feature?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project site is underlain by Quaternary alluvium (SanGIS 2012), which  is considered to have a “low” paleontological sensitivity due to its relatively young age and high‐energy  depositional history. Low resource sensitivity areas are unlikely to produce unique fossil remains  (although important paleontological resources have occurred infrequently in local low sensitivity  deposits); however, when fossils are found in low sensitivity formations, they are often very significant  additions to the geologic understanding of the area (County 2007). The Project would involve excavation  for the new lift station, which is estimated to require export of 1,500 CY of material. This excavation  would have the potential to encounter and affect paleontological resources if present within the “low”  paleontological sensitivity deposits underlying the Project site. The Project would voluntarily comply  with Section 87.430 of the County of San Diego Grading Ordinance, which provides that the County  official (e.g., grading permit compliance coordinator) may require a paleontological monitor during all or  selected grading operations, to monitor for the presence of paleontological resources. If fossils greater  than 12 inches in any dimension are encountered, then all grading operations in the area of discovery  must be suspended immediately and not resumed until authorized by the County official. The Grading  Ordinance also requires immediate notification of the County official regarding the discovery. The  County official must determine the appropriate resource recovery operation, which the permittee must  carry out prior to the County official’s authorization to resume normal grading operations. Through  compliance with Section 87.430 of the County of San Diego Grading Ordinance, the Project’s impacts  related to paleontological resources would be less than significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  30  VIII. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Generate greenhouse gas emissions, either directly or  indirectly, that may have a significant impact on the  environment?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Conflict with an applicable plan, policy or regulation  adopted for the purpose of reducing the emissions of  greenhouse gases?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐    Global climate change refers to changes in average climatic conditions, including temperature, wind  patterns, precipitation, and storms. Global temperatures are moderated by naturally occurring  atmospheric gases, including water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O),  ozone, and certain hydro‐fluorocarbons. These gases, known as greenhouse gases (GHGs), allow solar  radiation (sunlight) into the Earth’s atmosphere, but prevent radiative heat from escaping, thus warming  the Earth’s atmosphere. GHGs are emitted by both natural processes and human activities. The  accumulation of GHGs in the atmosphere regulates the Earth’s temperature. Emissions of GHGs in  excess of natural ambient concentrations are thought to be responsible for the enhancement of the  greenhouse effect and contributing to what is termed “global warming,” the trend of warming of the  Earth’s climate from anthropogenic activities. Global climate change impacts are by nature cumulative,  as direct impacts cannot be evaluated due to the fact that the impacts themselves are global rather than  localized impacts.  California Health and Safety Code Section 38505(g) defines GHGs to include the following compounds:  CO2, CH4, N2O, ozone, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs),  and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). As individual GHGs have varying heat‐trapping properties and atmospheric  lifetimes, GHG emissions are converted to carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) units for comparison. The  CO2e is a consistent methodology for comparing GHG emissions because it normalizes various GHG  emissions to a consistent measure.1 The most common GHGs related to the Project are those primarily  related to energy usage: CO2, CH4, and N2O.  a) Generate greenhouse gas emissions, either directly or indirectly, that may have a significant impact  on the environment?  Less Than Significant Impact. There are no established federal, state, or local quantitative thresholds  applicable to the Project to determine the quantity of GHG emissions that may have a significant effect  on the environment. CARB, the California Air Pollution Control Officers Association (CAPCOA), and  various cities and agencies have proposed, or adopted on an interim basis, thresholds of significance    1 The effect each GHG has on climate change is measured as a combination of the volume of its emissions, and its global  warming potential. The global warming potential is the potential of a gas or aerosol to trap heat in the atmosphere, and is  expressed as a function of how much warming would be caused by the same mass of CO2. For instance, CH4 has a global  warming potential of 21, meaning that 1 gram of CH4 traps the same amount of heat as 21 grams of CO2. N2O has a global  warming potential of 310.  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  31  that require the implementation of GHG emission reduction measures. For the proposed Project, the  most appropriate screening threshold for determining GHG emissions is CAPCOA’s 900‐metric ton (MT)  CO2e screening threshold. The 900 MT CO2e screening threshold was determined by CAPCOA as an  emission level that would indicate a project’s emissions would result in less than cumulatively significant  impacts and would not interfere with the ability of the State to achieve State reduction targets. The  900 MT CO2e per year screening threshold was developed by analyzing the capture of 90 percent or  more of future discretionary development for residential and commercial land use developments. The  900 MT CO2e screening threshold is intended to identify projects that would not interfere with  implementation of Executive Order S‐3‐05, which aims to reduce GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020,  and 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. The CAPCOA guidance indicates that projects that do not  exceed the 900 MT CO2e threshold would be consistent with State reduction targets identified in  Assembly Bill (AB) 32. Under Senate Bill (SB) 32, the State has revised its commitment to also reduce it  GHG emissions to 40 percent below 1990 by 2030. For projects that would be developed after 2020, the  900‐MT goal is proportionally reduced, resulting in a threshold of 697 MT CO2e for the Project’s first full  year of operations, which is anticipated to be 2025.  Construction Emissions   Project construction would generate GHG emissions associated with equipment operation and earth  movement at the site, the transport of construction materials and equipment to the site, and worker  vehicles traveling to and from the site. CO2 from gasoline and diesel fuel combustion would be the  primary GHG emission during the construction period. Generation of these emissions would be  temporary.  Total GHG emissions from Project construction are presented in Table 4, Total Estimated Construction  GHG Emissions. As shown in Table 4, the proposed construction activities are estimated to contribute a  total of 355 MT of CO2e. Amortized over 30 years, the proposed construction activities are estimated to  contribute approximately 12 MT CO2e per year.  Table 4  TOTAL ESTIMATED CONSTRUCTION GHG EMISSIONS  Phase Emissions (MT CO2e)  Site Preparation – 2023  1  Excavation – 2023  34  Material Hauling – 2023  6  Light Grading – 2023  1  Structure Construction – 2023 34  Structure Construction – 2024 240  Facilities Installation – 2024 28  Demolition – 2024  10  Paving – 2024  1  Total Construction Emissions 355  Amortized Construction Emissions 12  CalEEMod outputs provided in Appendix A.  MT = metric tons; CO2e = carbon dioxide equivalent    Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  32  Operational Emissions   The primary source of GHG emissions during Project operation would be energy use (electricity) to  power the lift station pumps. The Project is anticipated to require 70 kilowatt‐hours (kWh) of electricity  per day. Energy‐related emissions would also occur from testing of the diesel‐powered backup  generator and its use to power the lift station in the instance of electrical failure. An additional source of  emissions would be from operational maintenance vehicle trips (anticipated to be one visit to and from  the site per day).   Table 5, Total Estimated Operational GHG Emissions, presents the total GHG emissions by operational  phase. With the amortized construction emissions, the Project would result in annual GHG emissions of  26 MT CO2e, which would be below the applicable 697 MT CO2e per year screening threshold. Further,  this analysis conservatively does not account for GHG emissions that would be eliminated from  demolishing the existing lift station. As such, impacts would be less than significant.   Table 5  TOTAL ESTIMATED OPERATIONAL GHG EMISSIONS  Source Emissions (MT CO2e)  Area <0.5  Energy  6  Mobile 2  Stationary 5  Subtotal Operational Emissions 14  Amortized Construction Emissions 12  TOTAL OPERATIONAL EMISSIONS 26  CalEEMod outputs provided in Appendix A.  Note: Total may not sum due to rounding.  MT = metric tons; CO2e = carbon dioxide equivalent     b) Conflict with an applicable plan, policy, or regulation adopted for the purpose of reducing the  emissions of greenhouse gases?  Less Than Significant Impact. There are numerous State plans, policies, and regulations adopted for the  purpose of reducing GHG emissions. The principal overall State plan and policy is AB 32 (the California  Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006) and SB 32 (Amendments to the California Global Warming  Solutions Act of 2006). The quantitative goal of AB 32 was to reduce GHG emissions to 1990 levels by  2020. SB 32 requires further reductions of 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030 and 80 percent below  1990 levels by 2050. These statewide plans and regulations are being implemented at the statewide  level, and compliance on a project‐specific level is not addressed. Further, a number of prominent  statewide plans and regulations, as well as regional plans (e.g., SANDAG’s San Diego Forward: The  Regional Plan) aimed at reducing GHG emissions focus on reducing transportation source emissions. The  proposed Project would generate minimal vehicle miles travels and would therefore not conflict with  such policies and regulations.  In addition, as previously discussed, the increase in GHG emissions from implementation of the project  would be less than the reduced CAPCOA significance threshold being applied to this analysis in  accordance with SB 32 reduction targets.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  33  As such, implementation of the proposed Project would not conflict with an applicable plan, policy, or  regulation adopted for the purpose of reducing GHG emissions. Impacts would be less than significant.   IX. HAZARDS AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Create a significant hazard to the public or the  environment through the routine transport, use, or  disposal of hazardous materials?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Create a significant hazard to the public or the  environment through reasonably foreseeable upset and  accident conditions involving the release of hazardous  materials into the environment?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  c) Emit hazardous emissions or handle hazardous or acutely  hazardous materials, substances, or waste within one‐ quarter mile of an existing or proposed school?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  d) Be located on a site which is included on a list of  hazardous materials sites compiled pursuant to  Government Code Section 65962.5 and, as a result, would  it create a significant hazard to the public or the  environment?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  e) For a project located within an airport land use plan or,  where such a plan has not been adopted, within two  miles of a public airport or public use airport, would the  Project result in a safety hazard or excessive noise for  people residing or working in the Project area?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  f) Impair implementation of or physically interfere with an  adopted emergency response plan or emergency  evacuation plan?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  g) Expose people or structures, either directly or indirectly,  to a significant risk of loss, injury or death involving  wildland fires?  ☐ ☒ ☐ ☐    a) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through the routine transport, use, or  disposal of hazardous materials?  Less Than Significant Impact. During Project construction, standard hazardous substances used to  maintain and operate construction equipment, such as fuels, lubricants, adhesives, and solvents, would  be present. The use of such construction‐related hazardous materials could potentially result in  significant impacts through accidental discharge; however, the transport, use, and disposal of hazardous  materials would be temporary and would be conducted in accordance with applicable federal and state  laws. In addition, Project construction would involve implementation of a safety plan by the contractor  that would include BMPs to address the handling and discharge of contaminants (including construction‐ Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  34  related hazardous materials). Based on compliance with regulatory standards and implementation of  appropriate BMPs, potential impacts associated with construction‐related hazardous materials would be  less than significant.   Operation of the Project would involve the on‐site use and storage of diesel fuel for the lift station’s  backup generator. Such use and storage would be conducted in accordance with applicable federal,  state, and local laws and regulations. Further, the on‐site use and storage of diesel fuel would not  represent a change from existing conditions. OWD has an existing Unified Program Facility Permit with  the County for the current use and storage of diesel fuel at the site associated with the existing backup  generator. OWD would modify the existing permit to accommodate the proposed Project. As such,  potential impacts associated with operation‐related hazardous materials would be less than significant.   b) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through reasonably foreseeable upset  and accident conditions involving the release of hazardous materials into the environment?  Less Than Significant Impact. As discussed above in Item IX(a), Project construction would require the  use of standard construction‐related hazardous materials, which could be at risk of release through  upset and/or accident conditions. The potential for release would be minimized through  implementation of a Cal‐OSHA Construction Safety Plan and a hazard communication program during  construction, as required under Section 5194 of the California Code of Regulations. The hazard  communication program would include disclosure of the hazardous materials present on site, labels for  hazardous materials containers, safety data sheets (with information on the health effects of hazardous  materials), and employee training on hazardous materials handling. In the event of an accidental release  of hazardous substances, the Project would comply with Code of Federal Regulations Section 1910.120,  which outlines protocol for hazardous waste clean‐up operations and emergency response. Through  compliance with these regulations and procedures, the Project would not create a significant hazard to  the public or the environment through reasonably foreseeable upset and/or accident conditions  involving the release of hazardous materials during construction, and impacts would be less than  significant.   Operation of the Project would involve the use and storage of diesel fuel for the backup generator, as  discussed above in Item IX(a). The use and storage of diesel fuel would be conducted in accordance with  applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations and would not represent a change from existing  conditions at the site. As such, impacts would be less than significant.   c) Emit hazardous emissions or handle hazardous or acutely hazardous materials, substances, or waste  within one‐quarter mile of an existing or proposed school?  Less Than Significant Impact. There are no schools within one‐quarter mile of the Project site. The  nearest school, Jamacha Elementary School, is located approximately 0.3 mile to the east of the Project  site. Therefore, the Project would not emit hazardous emissions or handle acutely hazardous materials,  substances, or waste within one‐quarter mile of a school. Further, the Project’s use of hazardous  materials would be limited to standard materials for equipment maintenance and operation, such as  fuels, lubricants, adhesives, and solvents. These materials would be handled in accordance with  applicable laws and regulations and would not represent a substantial risk to uses in the vicinity of the  Project. Impacts would be less than significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  35  d) Be located on a site which is included on a list of hazardous materials sites compiled pursuant to  Government Code Section 65962.5 and, as a result, would it create a significant hazard to the public  or the environment?  No Impact. Pursuant to Government Code Section 65962.5 (Cortese List) requirements, the State Water  Resources Control Board GeoTracker database (2021) and the California Department of Toxic  Substances Control EnviroStor database (2021) were searched for hazardous materials sites in proximity  to the Project site. The results of these searches indicated that neither the Project site nor nearby  properties are included on a list of hazardous materials sites. The nearest listed site is located  approximately 0.6 mile to the northwest and is a case associated with gasoline‐contaminated soil at a  gas station. The case was closed in 2011 and does not represent a risk at the Project site. As such, no  impacts would occur.   e) For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted,  within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, would the Project result in a safety hazard  or excessive noise for people residing or working in the Project area?  No Impact. The closest airport to the Project site is Gillespie Field, located approximately 6 miles to the  northwest. There are no public or private airports within two miles of the Project site; therefore, the  Project would not result in a safety hazard or excessive noise for people or residing or working in the  Project area. No impacts would occur.   f) Impair implementation of or physically interfere with an adopted emergency response plan or  emergency evacuation plan?  No Impact. Project implementation would occur within OWD’s existing access road and lift station site  and within adjacent decommissioned golf course land. The Project would not occur within or affect  public roadways and would therefore not impair implementation of or physically interfere with an  adopted emergency response plan or emergency evacuation plan. No impact would occur.   g) Expose people or structures, either directly or indirectly, to a significant risk of loss, injury or death  involving wildland fires?  Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated. According to mapping compiled by the California  Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE; 2020), the Project site is within an area mapped  as a very high fire hazard severity zone. The Project, as a lift station, would not introduce permanent  occupants to the site. Temporary construction workers and occasional operational maintenance workers  would not be present for extended periods of time and would therefore not be at substantial risk from  wildland fires; however, because the Project is within a very high fire hazard severity zone, risk from  wildfire does exist, most notably during the Project’s construction period when equipment with  combustion engines would be present. As such, impacts are considered potentially significant, and the  fire prevention strategies outlined below in mitigation measure MM‐HAZFIRE‐1 would be implemented  during Project construction.  Operation of the Project would generally not involve activities that would increase fire risk. Further,  construction and operation of the lift station structure would occur in compliance with applicable  portions of the County Fire Code, contained as Title 9, Division 6, Chapter 1 of the County of San Diego  Code of Regulatory Ordinances. Such compliance, in addition to implementation of mitigation measure  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  36  MM‐HAZFIRE‐1, would result in less‐than‐significant impacts as related to the exposure of people or  structures to significant risk from wildland fires.   Mitigation The following mitigation measure would be required to reduce potential impacts related to wildland  fires to a less‐than‐significant level.   MM‐HAZFIRE‐1 Construction Fire Safety Plan. The following fire prevention strategies shall be  implemented during Project construction:  • Construction within areas of dense foliage during dry conditions shall be  avoided, when feasible.  • In cases where avoidance is not feasible, brush fire prevention and management  practices shall be incorporated. Specifics of the brush management program  shall be incorporated into Project construction documents.  X. HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Violate any water quality standards or waste discharge  requirements or otherwise substantially degrade surface  or ground water quality?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Substantially decrease groundwater supplies or interfere  substantially with groundwater recharge such that the  Project may impede sustainable groundwater  management of the basin?   ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  c) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern of the site  or area, including through the alteration of the course of  a stream or river or through the addition of impervious  surfaces, in a manner which would:       i. Result in substantial erosion or siltation on‐ or off‐ site? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  ii. Substantially increase the rate or amount of surface  runoff in a manner which would result in flooding on‐  or off‐ site?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  iii. Create or contribute runoff water which would  exceed the capacity of existing or planned  stormwater drainage systems or provide substantial  additional resources of polluted runoff?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  iv. Impede or redirect flood flows? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  37    Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  d) In flood hazard, tsunami, or seiche zones, risk release of  pollutants due to Project inundation? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  e) Conflict with or obstruct implementation of a water  quality control plan or sustainable groundwater  management plan?   ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐    a) Violate any water quality standards or waste discharge requirements or otherwise substantially  degrade surface or ground water quality?  Less Than Significant Impact. Potential water quality impacts from the Project would be limited  primarily to construction‐related concerns, including erosion/sedimentation and the release of  hazardous substances such as vehicle fuels and lubricants. Potential construction‐related water quality  impacts would be avoided or reduced below a level of significance through implementation of an  erosion control plan and a safety control by the contractor during construction. The plans would include  construction and post‐construction BMPs to reduce potential effects to surface water quality due to  storm water runoff pollution from the construction site. Such BMPs would include erosion control/  stabilizing measures in cleared areas and on graded slopes (e.g., geotextiles, mats, fiber rolls, soil  binders, temporary hydroseeding); sediment controls (e.g., temporary inlet filters, silt fences, fiber rolls,  gravel bags, temporary sediment basins, check dams, street sweeping, energy dissipaters); and  stabilized construction access points (e.g., temporary gravel or pavement) and sediment stockpiles  (e.g., silt fences and tarps). Construction period impacts related to violation of water quality standards  would therefore be less than significant.  Operation of the proposed lift station would not involve regular activities that would have the potential  to violate water quality standards or waste discharge requirements.   Project implementation would not result in direct or indirect impacts to groundwater quality through  activities such as underground storage of hazardous materials or discharge of contaminated runoff that  could percolate into local aquifers. If dewatering is required during construction, the Project would be  required to obtain a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) groundwater extraction  and waste discharge permit and conform to requirements therein. Conformance with applicable  requirements under the NPDES groundwater permit would ensure that associated regulatory standards  are met and would reduce potential construction‐related water quality impacts from groundwater  extraction/disposal (if required) to less‐than‐significant levels.  b) Substantially decrease groundwater supplies or interfere substantially with groundwater recharge  such that the Project may impede sustainable groundwater management of the basin?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project would not require the direct use of groundwater supplies.  While dewatering may be required if groundwater is encountered during construction, the volume of  extracted groundwater would be negligible based on the size of the Project and required excavation and  would not represent a substantial decrease in groundwater supplies. For construction‐related  dewatering, the Project would be required to obtain a NPDES groundwater extraction and waste  discharge permit and conform to requirements therein. Conformance with applicable requirements  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  38  under the NPDES groundwater permit would ensure that associated regulatory standards are met. While  the Project would increase the amount of impervious surface at the site, it would not be of an amount  that would substantially interfere with groundwater recharge. Impacts would be less than significant.   c) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern of the site or area, including through the alteration  of the course of a stream or river or through the addition of impervious surfaces, in a manner which  would:  i. Result in substantial erosion or siltation on‐ or off‐site?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project would not result in the alteration of the course of a stream or  river. Potential erosion/siltation impacts would generally be limited to the Project’s construction period  and would be avoided or reduced below a level of significance through implementation of an erosion  control plan. As discussed previously in Items VII(b) and X(a), the erosion control plan would include  BMPs such as control/stabilizing measures in cleared areas and on graded slopes, sediment controls,  and stabilized construction access points and sediment stockpiles to minimize the potential for erosion.  Upon completion of construction activities, the Project site would be paved, similar to existing  conditions, and would not result in the potential for substantial soil erosion or loss of topsoil. Impacts  would be less than significant.   ii. Substantially increase the rate or amount of surface runoff in a manner which would result in  flooding on‐ or off‐ site?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project would not result in the alteration of the course of a stream or  river. As previously discussed in Item X(a), the Project would implement stormwater BMPs to control  stormwater runoff during construction. Although Project operations would involve more impervious  surfaces than the existing condition, the associated increase in stormwater runoff would be negligible  based on the size of the Project and would not result in flooding on or off site. As such, impacts would  be less than significant.   iii. Create or contribute runoff water which would exceed the capacity of existing or planned  stormwater drainage systems or provide substantial additional sources of polluted runoff?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project would not result in the alteration of the course of a stream or  river. As previously discussed in Item X(a), the Project would implement stormwater BMPs to control  polluted stormwater runoff during construction. Operationally, although the Project would result in an  increase in impervious surfaces over the existing condition, the associated increase in stormwater runoff  would be negligible based on the size of the Project would and would not create or generate runoff  water that would exceed the capacity of existing or planned stormwater drainage systems. As a result,  potential impacts related to drainage system capacity and the generation of polluted runoff from Project  implementation would be less than significant.  iv. Impede or redirect flood flows?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project would not result in the alteration of the course of a stream or  river. The Project would develop impervious surfaces and other aboveground components (lift station  structure, generator, and storage tank) at the site that would have the potential to impede or redirect  flood flows; however, the Project site is not located with a special flood hazard area designated by the  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  39  Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA; 2012) and therefore the Project components are not  anticipated to impede or redirect flood flows. Impacts would be less than significant.   d) In flood hazard, tsunami, or seiche zones, risk release of pollutants due to Project inundation?  No Impact. As mentioned above in Item X(c.iv), the Project site is not located within a special flood  hazard area designated by FEMA (2012). Based on the distance to the Pacific Ocean (14.9 miles) and the  Sweetwater Reservoir (4.8 miles), there is no risk of tsunami or seiche at the Project site. Therefore, the  Project would not risk release of pollutants to due inundation, and no impact would occur.   e) Conflict with or obstruct implementation of a water quality control plan or sustainable groundwater  management plan?  Less Than Significant Impact. Refer to Items X(a) through X(d). The Project would comply with  applicable storm water quality standards during construction and operation, and appropriate BMPs  would be implemented to address potential water quality impacts. Therefore, the Project would not  conflict with or obstruct implementation of a water quality control plan or sustainable groundwater  management plan, and impacts would be less than significant.   XI. LAND USE AND PLANNING   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Physically divide an established community? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  b) Cause significant environmental impact due to a conflict  with any land use plan, policy, or regulation adopted for  the purpose of avoiding or mitigating an environmental  effect?   ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    a) Physically divide an established community?  No Impact. The Project involves the replacement of a lift station and associated infrastructure at the  existing lift station site and adjacent property that would be acquired by OWD. The Project site, which is  located between a private residential property and a decommissioned golf course, does not provide  access or connectivity to other uses. As such, the Project would not physically divide an established  community; no impact would occur.   b) Cause significant environmental impact due to a conflict with any land use plan, policy, or regulation  adopted for the purpose of avoiding or mitigating an environmental effect?   No Impact. The Project involves the replacement of a lift station and associated infrastructure at the  existing lift station site that is within an OWD easement and adjacent property that would be acquired  by OWD. The Project would expand the lift station site but would not introduce a new land use. Further,  the site has a General Plan land use designation of Open Space (Recreation) and a zoning designation of  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  40  Specific Plan Area (S88), neither of which preclude utility infrastructure. The Project would therefore not  conflict with land use or zoning designations, and no impact would occur.  As discussed above in Item IV(f), OWD is not a participating entity in any adopted Habitat Conservation  Plan, Natural Conservation Community Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat  conservation plan; therefore, no impacts would occur to any such plans.  XII. MINERAL RESOURCES   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Result in the loss of availability of a known mineral  resource that would be of value to the region and the  residents of the state?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Result in the loss of availability of a locally‐important  mineral resource recovery site delineated on a local  general plan, specific plan or other land use plan?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐    a) Result in the loss of availability of a known mineral resource that would be of value to the region  and the residents of the state?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project site is in an area designated as Mineral Resource Zone (MRZ) 1  by the California Geological Survey (California Geological Survey 2017). MRZ‐1 includes areas where  available geologic information indicates that little likelihood exists for the presence of significant mineral  resources. As such, the Project would not result in the loss of availability of a known mineral resource  that would be of value to the region and residents of the state. Impacts would be less than significant.   b) Result in the loss of availability of a locally important mineral resource recovery site delineated on a  local general plan, specific plan, or other land use plan?  Less Than Significant Impact. As discussed above in Item XII(b), the Project site is in an area designated  as MRZ‐1 by the California Geological Survey (California Geological Survey 2017), which indicates that  little likelihood exists for the presence of significant mineral resources. Further, the Project site has a  zoning designation of Specific Plan Area (S88), which limits extractive uses to site preparation. The  Project site is not planned for extractive uses and would therefore not result in the loss of availability of  a locally important mineral resource recovery site delineated on a local general plan, specific plan, or  other land use plan. Impacts would be less than significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  41  XIII. NOISE   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project result in:      a) Generation of a substantial temporary or permanent  increase in ambient noise levels in the vicinity of the  Project in excess of standards established in the local  general plan or noise ordinance, or applicable standards  of other agencies?  ☐ ☒ ☐ ☐  b) Generation of excessive groundborne vibration or  groundborne noise levels?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  c) For a project located within the vicinity of a private  airstrip or an airport land use plan or, where such a plan  has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport  or public use airport, would the Project expose people  residing or working in the Project area to excessive noise  levels?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    The following discussion is based on the Noise Impact Analysis letter report prepared for the Project by  HELIX (2021c) and included as Appendix D to this IS.   a) Generation of a substantial temporary or permanent increase in ambient noise levels in the vicinity  of the Project in excess of standards established in the local general plan or noise ordinance, or  applicable standards of other agencies?  Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated. The Project would generate noise during both its  construction and operation that would have the potential to affect nearby noise sensitive land uses  (NSLUs), which include single‐family residential properties immediately east of the Project site. The  following includes background information on noise terminology and metrics, a summary of applicable  regulations, and analysis of potential construction and operation noise impacts.  Noise Terminology and Metrics All noise level or sound level values presented herein are expressed in terms of decibels (dB), with  A‐weighting (dBA) to approximate the hearing sensitivity of humans. Time‐averaged noise levels are  expressed by the symbol LEQ, with a specified duration. The Community Noise Equivalent Level (CNEL) is  a 24‐hour average, where noise levels during the evening hours of 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. have an  added 5 dBA weighting, and sound levels during the nighttime hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. have an  added 10 dBA weighting. This is similar to the Day Night sound level (LDN), which is a 24‐hour average  with an added 10 dBA weighting on the same nighttime hours but no added weighting on the evening  hours. Sound levels expressed in CNEL are always based on dBA. These metrics are used to express noise  levels for both measurement and municipal regulations, as well as for land use guidelines and  enforcement of noise ordinances.  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  42  Sound can be described as the mechanical energy of a vibrating object transmitted by pressure waves  through a liquid or gaseous medium (e.g., air) to a hearing organ, such as a human ear. Noise is defined  as loud, unexpected, or annoying sound.  In the science of acoustics, the fundamental model consists of a sound (or noise) source, a receiver, and  the propagation path between the two. The loudness of the noise source and obstructions or  atmospheric factors affecting the propagation path to the receiver contribute to the sound level and  characteristics of the noise perceived by the receiver. The field of acoustics deals primarily with the  propagation and control of sound.  Continuous sound can be described by frequency (pitch) and amplitude (loudness). A low frequency  sound is perceived as low in pitch. Frequency is expressed in terms of cycles per second, or Hertz (Hz)  (e.g., a frequency of 250 cycles per second is referred to as 250 Hz). High frequencies are sometimes  more conveniently expressed in kilohertz (kHz), or thousands of Hertz. The audible frequency range for  humans is generally between 20 Hz and 20,000 Hz.  The amplitude of pressure waves generated by a sound source determines the loudness of that source.  A logarithmic scale is used to describe sound pressure level (SPL) in terms of dBA units. The threshold of  hearing for the human ear is approximately 0 dBA, which corresponds to 20 micro Pascals (mPa).   Because decibels are logarithmic units, SPL cannot be added or subtracted through ordinary arithmetic.  Under the decibel scale, a doubling of sound energy corresponds to a 3 dBA increase. In other words,  when two identical sources are each producing sound of the same loudness, the resulting sound level at  a given distance would be 3 dBA higher than one source under the same conditions.  Regulatory Framework Sections 36.401 through 36.423 of the County of San Diego Code of Regulatory Ordinances discuss  further County noise requirements. The purpose of the Noise Ordinance is to regulate noise in the  unincorporated area of the County to promote the public health, comfort, and convenience of the  County’s inhabitants and its visitors.  Section 36.404 sets limits pertaining to the generation of exterior noise and is based on the zoning of  the property receiving the noise. Properties to the east are zoned A‐70 and include single‐family  residential uses. The applicable noise level limits are 50 dBA during the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.  or 45 dBA during the hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. Properties to the north and west are zoned S‐88.  According to Section 36.404(c) of the County of San Diego Noise Ordinance, the applicable property line  noise limits for the S88 zone depends on the use being made of the property. The property to the north  and west of the Project site currently includes a decommissioned golf course; however, it has a land use  designation of Open Space (Recreation) and will likely be used as such in the future. The noise limits for  open space (S‐80) are 50 dBA during the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and 45 dBA during the hours of  10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. Therefore, for this analysis, noise levels limits of 50 dBA during the hours of  7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and 45 dBA during the hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. are used at the Project’s  eastern, northern, and western property lines. The southern Project site property line (at the base of the  access road) is located away from where the noise‐generating equipment would be and is therefore not  considered herein.   Section 36.408 states that it is unlawful for any person to operate or cause to be operated construction  equipment between the hours of 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. or on a Sunday or holiday. Section 36.409  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  43  limits construction noise to a level of 75 dBA LEQ (8‐hour) as measured at the boundary line of the  property where the noise source is located or on any occupied property where noise is being received,  when equipment is operated between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.   Construction Noise Impacts On‐site Construction Activities   The Project’s expected on‐site construction activities can be grouped into three main components:  (1) access road improvements; (2) construction of the new lift station; and (3) demolition of the existing  lift station structures. Construction would generate elevated noise levels that could be audible to the  residential NSLUs to the east of the Project site. The magnitude of the impact would depend on the type  of construction activity, equipment used, duration of each construction phase, distance between the  noise source and receiver(s), and any intervening structures. Construction equipment would not all  operate at the same time or location. Furthermore, construction equipment would not be in constant  use during the 8‐hour operating day.   Access Road Improvements   Work for the access road improvements would involve site preparation (vegetation clearing), light  grading, and paving, and would occur at an approximate average distance of 30 feet from the residential  property line to the east. Site preparation and light grading are anticipated to be accomplished using a  single skid steer. Paving would be accomplished using a roller and a paver, which would be used  consecutively, not simultaneously, and would therefore not combine to generate elevated noise levels.  At 30 feet, a skid steer is estimated to generate a noise level of 75.5 dBA LEQ, a roller 77.4 dBA LEQ, and a  paver 78.6 dBA LEQ, all of which exceed the 75‐dBA LEQ limit; however, this is assuming that the  equipment is operating at a stationary location and generating maximum noise levels at a single  receptor location located 30 feet way. In actuality, these pieces of equipment would be mobile along the  length of the approximately 270‐foot‐long access road and would not remain within 30 feet of a given  receptor location over the course of a workday. As such, noise levels at a given receptor location from  construction work along the access road are expected to be below the 75‐dBA limit over the course of  an 8‐hour workday.   Lift Station Construction   Construction of the new lift station site would involve site preparation (vegetation clearing), excavation  for the below‐grade wet well and dry well, light grading, construction of the lift station structure and site  area pad, installation and connection of facilities, and paving. Work for the lift station site construction  would occur throughout the lift station site area (i.e., the portion of the Project site excluding the access  road); therefore, for noise analysis purposes, construction equipment is modeled to be located at the  center of the lift station site area, at an approximate distance of 50 feet from the closest residential  property line to the east. This distance represents the assumed average distance to the property line  that construction equipment would be operating at over the course of an 8‐hour workday. The loudest  combination of pieces of equipment anticipated to be used simultaneously for each of these  construction activities and the resultant noise levels at 50 feet are shown in Table 6, Lift Station  Construction Noise Levels.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  44  Table 6  LIFT STATION CONSTRUCTION NOISE LEVELS  Activity Simultaneous Equipment Noise Level at   50 feet (dBA LEQ)  Exceed 75 dBA  Limit?  Site Preparation  Skid steer 71.0 No  Excavation  Excavator and dump truck  78.1 Yes   Backhoe and dump truck  76.1 Yes  Light Grading  Skid steer  71.0 No  Structure Construction  Concrete pump truck and  concrete mixer truck  77.6 Yes   Backhoe and dump truck 76.1 Yes   Structure Construction Crane and delivery truck 75.6 Yes    Crane and welder  74.5 No  Facilities Installation Crane and welder  74.5 No  Paving  Roller 73.0 No   Paver  74.2 No  Source: RCNM (USDOT 2008)    As shown in Table 6, excavation and structure construction are estimated to result in noise levels in  excess of the 75‐dBA LEQ limit; therefore, the Project’s temporary construction noise impacts are  considered potentially significant. Mitigation measure MM‐NOI‐1, provided below, would be required to  reduce impacts to a less‐than‐significant level.   Existing Lift Station Demolition  Demolition of the existing concrete block lift station structure would be required and would occur at an  approximate average distance of 30 feet from the residential property line to the east. Initial demolition  is expected to be accomplished using either a concrete saw or a breaker. At 30 feet, a concrete saw is  estimated to generate a noise level of 87.0 dBA LEQ and a breaker is estimated to generate a noise level  of 87.7 dBA LEQ. Excavated materials would then likely be loaded into a dump truck using a loader. A  loader and dump truck operating simultaneously are estimated to generate a combined noise level of  81.5 dBA LEQ at 30 feet. These demolition activities have the potential to result in noise levels in excess  of the 75‐dBA LEQ limit; therefore, the Project’s temporary construction noise impacts are considered  potentially significant. Mitigation measure MM‐NOI‐1 would be required to reduce impacts to a less‐ than‐significant level.  Off‐site Construction Activities   The Project would result in approximately 1,500 CY of excavated material that would either be taken by  the adjacent golf course or taken to an off‐site disposal location. If taken off site, the export of material  would be accomplished via approximately 100 haul trucks, assuming a single truck hauls 15 CY of  material. Each haul truck would make one trip to the Project site to pick up the material and another trip  from the Project site to transport the material, resulting in a total of 200 haul truck trips. These trips are  anticipated to occur over the course of 10 workdays, for a total of 20 haul truck trips per day, or 2.5 trips  per hour over the course of an 8‐hour workday. The haul trucks would generate noise that may be  audible to residential NSLUs along Par 4 Drive.   TNM software was used to calculate noise levels at residences from the haul trucks traveling along Par 4  Drive. For modeling purposes, 3 trucks per hour was assumed (rounded up from the 2.5 trucks per hour  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  45  discussed above). The closest residential exterior use areas are located approximately 30 feet from the  center of Par 4 Drive. At a distance of 30 feet, 3 trucks per hour traveling at a speed of 25 miles per hour  would generate a noise level of 52.6 dBA LEQ. This would be well below the 75‐dBA LEQ limit for  construction noise, and associated impacts would be less than significant.   Operational Noise Impacts Operation of the proposed lift station would include equipment that would generate elevated noise  levels. The two primary operational noise‐generating components of the Project would be (1) the lift  station pump motors and ventilation system, and (2) the diesel backup generator. Design plans are not  available at this stage in the planning process to provide specific equipment location information or  equipment noise data; therefore, assumptions based on typical lift station design and standard lift  station equipment are used herein for this analysis.   The two 40‐HP pump motors would be located within the lift station structure and are expected to  generate interior noise levels ranging from 75 to 90 dBA. The structure would include a vent for air  ventilation, and the pump motor noise would transfer from the interior to the exterior of the structure  through the vent. Additional noise would occur from the ventilation fan near the vent opening. While  dependent on the specific type of equipment and size of the vent, exterior noise levels are expected to  be up to approximately 80 dBA at 10 feet for standard equipment of this size. Based on this noise level,  the vent noise levels could be above 50 dBA within 300 feet and above 45 dBA within 550 feet. Since the  Project’s lift station vent would be located within these distances to the property line(s), noise levels  would have the potential to exceed the applicable 50‐dBA LEQ daytime and 45‐dBA LEQ nighttime limits.  Mitigation measure MM‐NOI‐2 would be required to reduce impacts to a less‐than‐significant level.   The Project would include a backup generator that would be used to power the lift station in the  instance of normal power failure and would be tested regularly during daytime hours. A standard  generator of the size anticipated to be required for the Project is estimated to generate a noise level of  approximately 75 dBA at 23 feet. Based on this noise level, the generator noise levels could be above  50 dBA within 400 feet. Since the Project’s generator would be located within this distance to the  property line(s), noise levels would have the potential to exceed the applicable 50‐dBA LEQ daytime limit  during regular generator testing. Mitigation measure MM‐NOI‐3 would be required to reduce impacts to  a less‐than‐significant level.  Mitigation The following mitigation measures are required to reduce potential construction and operation noise  impacts to a less‐than‐significant level.   MM‐NOI‐1  Construction Noise Management Plan. Noise from Project construction activities shall  comply with the limits and hours specified in the County of San Diego Noise Ordinance.  Construction shall not occur outside the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Construction  noise shall not exceed 75 dBA LEQ (8‐hour) at nearby residential land uses.   Appropriate measures shall be implemented to reduce construction noise, including, but  not limited to, the following:   Construction equipment shall be properly outfitted and maintained with  manufacturer‐recommended noise‐reduction devices.  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  46   Diesel equipment shall be operated with closed engine doors and equipped with  factory‐recommended mufflers.   Mobile or fixed “package” equipment (e.g., arc‐welders and air compressors) shall  be equipped with shrouds and noise control features that are readily available for  that type of equipment.   Electrically powered equipment shall be used instead of pneumatic or internal  combustion powered equipment, where feasible.   Unnecessary idling of internal combustion engines (e.g., in excess of 5 minutes)  shall be prohibited.   The use of noise‐producing signals, including horns, whistles, alarms, and bells,  shall be for safety warning purposes only.   No Project‐related public address or music system shall be audible at any adjacent  sensitive receptor.    Any truck or equipment equipped with back‐up alarm moving within 300 feet of a  NSLU should have the normal back‐up alarm disengaged and safety provided by  lights and flagman or broad‐spectrum noise backup alarm (as appropriate for  conditions) used in compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health  Administration safety guidelines.   Temporary sound barriers or sound blankets shall be installed between  construction operations and adjacent NSLUs. The Project Contractor shall  construct a temporary noise barrier of a height breaking the line of sight between  the equipment and nearby receptors and meeting the specifications listed below  (or of a Sound Transmission Class [STC] 19 rating or better) to attenuate noise.   If a temporary barrier is used, all barriers shall be solid and constructed of wood,  plastic, fiberglass, steel, masonry, or a combination of those materials, with no  cracks or gaps through or below the wall. Any seams or cracks must be filled or  caulked. If wood is used, it can be tongue and groove or close butted seams and  must be at least 3/4‐inch thick or have a surface density of at least 3.5 pounds per  square‐foot. Sheet metal of 18‐gauge (minimum) may be used if it meets the  other criteria and is properly supported and stiffened so that it does not rattle or  create noise itself from vibration or wind. Noise blankets, hoods, or covers also  may be used, provided they are appropriately implemented to provide the  required sound attenuation.    Residents within 200 feet of the Project’s disturbance area shall be notified in  writing within one week of any construction activity. The notification shall  describe the activities anticipated, provide dates and hours, and provide contact  information with a description of a complaint and response procedure.  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  47   The on‐site construction supervisor shall have the responsibility and authority to  receive and resolve noise complaints. A clear appeal process for the affected  resident shall be established prior to construction commencement to allow for  resolution of noise problems that cannot be immediately solved by the site  supervisor.  MM‐NOI‐2  Lift Station Operation Noise Attenuation. Noise generated by operation of the lift  station pumps and ventilation system shall comply with the 50‐dBA limit during the  hours of 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and the 45‐dBA limit during the hours of 10:00 p.m. to  7:00 a.m. at the Project site’s eastern, western, and northern property lines. To  adequately reduce noise levels, noise attenuating equipment and/or acoustical shielding  shall be incorporated into Project design. Such features may include, but not be limited  to, acoustical louvers, in‐line silencers, and/or noise walls. Prior to building plan  approval, planning for the lift station noise sources shall be required to show noise  compliance with the 50‐dBA daytime limit and 45‐dBA nighttime limit at the property  lines. A final operational test shall be required with the pumps and ventilation system in  operation to ensure noise levels are below the required standards.  MM‐NOI‐3 Generator Noise Attenuation. Noise generated by the generator during regular testing  shall comply with the 50‐dBA limit at the Project site’s eastern, western, and northern  property lines. To adequately reduce noise levels, noise attenuating equipment and/or  acoustical shielding shall be incorporated into Project design. Such features may include,  but not be limited to, noise walls, noise control enclosures, and/or noise absorbing  paneling. Prior to building plan approval, planning for the generator shall be required to  show noise compliance with the 50‐dBA daytime limit at the property lines. A final  operational test shall be required with the generator in operation to ensure noise levels  are below the required standards.  Implementation of mitigation measures MM‐NOI‐1, MM‐NOI‐2, and MM‐NOI‐3 would allow the  Project’s construction and operation noise levels to not exceed thresholds. Impacts would be less than  significant with these mitigation measures.  b) Generation of excessive groundborne vibration or groundborne noise levels?  Less Than Significant Impact. A likely source of vibration during Project construction would be a  vibratory roller, which would be used for soil compaction for the Project’s expanded access road and lift  station area pad. A standard vibratory roller creates approximately 0.210 inch per second peak particle  velocity (PPV) at a distance of 25 feet (Caltrans 2020). Based on this metric, use of a vibratory roller  within 50 feet would have the potential to exceed the “strongly perceptible” vibration annoyance  potential criteria for human receptors of 0.1 inch per second PPV,2 as specified by Caltrans in its  Transportation and Construction Vibration Guidance Manual (2020). There is potential for use of a  vibratory roller to be required within 50 feet of off‐site residences for development of the Project’s  expanded access road, which could result in an exceedance of the “strongly perceptible” vibration  annoyance potential criteria for the residence immediately east of the Project’s access road. However,  exposure of this adjacent off‐site residences to vibration would be limited to very short durations. A  vibratory roller moves at a speed of approximately two miles per hour, which equates to 176 feet per    2  Equipment PPV = Reference PPV * (25/D)n(in/sec), where Reference PPV is PPV at 25 feet, D is distance from equipment to  the receptor in feet, and n= 1.1 (the value related to the attenuation rate through the ground); formula from Caltrans 2020.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  48  minute. As the residence adjacent to the access road is approximately 125 feet long, a vibratory roller  would be adjacent to the residence for approximately 43 seconds during a single pass, which would not  result in excessive or substantial exposure. Further, use of a vibratory roller for the access road would be  temporary. Temporary use of the vibratory roller at the lift station site would occur at distances greater  than 50 feet from the residence and would not result in excessive vibration. Other equipment used  during Project construction is expected to generate less ground‐borne vibration than a vibratory roller.  As such, the Project’s temporary construction vibration impacts would be less than significant.   The Project’s operations would not include components that would have the potential to generate  perceptible vibration at adjacent properties; therefore, no operational vibration impacts are identified.   c) For a project located within the vicinity of a private airstrip or an airport land use plan or, where  such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, would  the Project expose people residing or working in the Project area to excessive noise levels?  No Impact. The closest airport to the Project site is Gillespie Field, located approximately 6 miles to the  northwest. There are no public or private airports within two miles of the Project site; therefore, the  Proposed Project would not expose people residing or working to excessive aircraft noise, and no  impacts would occur.   XIV. POPULATION AND HOUSING   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Induce substantial unplanned population growth in an  area, either directly (for example, by proposing new  homes and businesses) or indirectly (for example, through  extension of roads or other infrastructure)?   ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Displace substantial numbers of existing people or  housing, necessitating the construction of replacement  housing elsewhere?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    a) Induce substantial unplanned population growth in an area, either directly (for example, by  proposing new homes and businesses) or indirectly (for example, through extension of roads or  other infrastructure)?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project involves the replacement of an existing lift station. While the  new lift station would have an increased capacity over the existing lift station, the increase in capacity is  to serve the local needs of existing and planned residential developments in the vicinity. The Project  itself would not induce growth; therefore, impacts would be less than significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  49  b) Displace substantial numbers of existing people or housing, necessitating the construction of  ‘replacement housing elsewhere?  No Impact. The Project involves the replacement of a lift station on the site of the existing lift station  and adjacent property that would be acquired by OWD. The property to be acquired is part of a  decommissioned golf course and does not include existing housing. As such, implementation of the  Project would not displace existing people or housing, and no impacts would occur.   XV. PUBLIC SERVICES   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project result in substantial adverse physical  impacts associated with the provision of new or physically  altered governmental facilities, need for new or physically  altered governmental facilities, the construction of which  could cause significant environmental impacts, in order to  maintain acceptable service ratios, response times or other  performance objectives for any of the public services:        a) Fire protection? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Police protection? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  c) Schools? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  d) Parks? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  e) Other public facilities? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    a) Fire protection?  Less Than Significant Impact. Fire protection services may be required during construction and/or  operation of the Project in the instance of an accidental fire event, which could occur, for example, in  association with off‐road construction equipment or mechanical equipment at the lift station; however,  the probability of such an event is low and potential fire protection requirements would be short‐term  and would not affect response times of local fire protection services. As such, potential impacts to fire  protection services would be less than significant.  b) Police protection?  Less Than Significant Impact. Police protection services may be required during construction and/or  operation of the Project in the instance of a crime event, which could occur, for example, in association  with trespassing, vandalism, and/or theft; however, the probability of such an event is low and potential  police protection requirements would be short‐term and would not affect response times of local police  protection services. As such, potential impacts to police protection services would be less than  significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  50  c) Schools?  No Impact. The proposed Project would not result in new housing or population growth that would  generate increased demand for school services. Project implementation would therefore not result in  the need to construct additional school facilities and no associated impacts would occur.   d) Parks?  No Impact. The proposed Project would not result in new housing or population growth that would  generate increased demand for parks. Project implementation would therefore not result in the need to  construct additional park facilities and no associated impacts would occur.  e) Other public facilities?  No Impact. The proposed Project would not result in new housing or population growth that would  generate increased demand for other types of public facilities. Project implementation would therefore  not result in the need to construct additional public facilities and no associated impacts would occur.   XVI. RECREATION   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Increase the use of existing neighborhood and regional  parks or other recreational facilities such that substantial  physical deterioration of the facility would occur or be  accelerated?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  b) Does the Project include recreational facilities or require  the construction or expansion of recreational facilities  which might have an adverse physical effect on the  environment?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    a) Increase the use of existing neighborhood and regional parks or other recreational facilities such  that substantial physical deterioration of the facility would occur or be accelerated?  No Impact. The proposed Project involves the reconstruction of a lift station, which would not generate  an increase in demand for existing parks or other recreational facilities. As such, implementation of the  Project would not result in or increase physical deterioration of such facilities, and no impacts would  occur.   b) Does the Project include recreational facilities or require the construction or expansion of  recreational facilities which might have an adverse physical effect on the environment?  No Impact. As a lift station replacement, the proposed Project would not include recreational facilities  or require the construction or expansion of recreational facilities. No associated impacts would occur.  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  51  XVII. TRANSPORTATION   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:       a) Conflict with a program plan, ordinance or policy  addressing the circulation system, including transit,  roadway, bicycle and pedestrian facilities?   ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Would the Project conflict or be inconsistent with CEQA  Guidelines section 15064.3, subdivision (b)? ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  c) Substantially increase hazards due to a geometric design  feature (e.g., sharp curves or dangerous intersections) or  incompatible uses (e.g., farm equipment)?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  d) Result in inadequate emergency access? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    a) Conflict with a program plan, ordinance or policy addressing the circulation system, including transit,  roadway, bicycle and pedestrian facilities?  Less Than Significant Impact. Project construction would result in a temporary increase in vehicular  traffic associated with construction worker commute vehicles, construction equipment and material  delivery vehicles, and soil export haul trucks. Based on the relatively small size of the Project, the  number of daily vehicle trips would be minimal and would not substantially affect traffic circulation  along existing roadways, including Par 4 Drive and Steele Canyon Road. While the Project may require  construction vehicle parking near the western terminus of Par 4 Drive, this roadway does not provide  through access that could be disrupted. Access to private residential driveways would be maintained.  Further, there are no transit, bicycle, or pedestrian facilities along Par 4 Drive that could be affected.  Following the completion of construction, Project‐generated traffic would be limited to routine  maintenance activities, similar to the existing condition. As such, impacts would be less than significant.   b) Would the Project conflict or be inconsistent with CEQA Guidelines section 15064.3, subdivision (b)?  Less Than Significant Impact. CEQA Guidelines Section 15064.3 subdivision (b) sets forth specific criteria  for determining the significance of transportation impacts. Subdivision (b) pertains to land use projects  and describes factors that may indicate whether the amount of a land use project’s vehicle miles  traveled may be significant or not. As discussed above in Item XVII(a), Project‐related trip generation  would be limited to a relatively small number of trips during the temporary construction period and  occasional trips for maintenance purposes during operations. The Project does not propose a land use  that would generate substantial vehicle miles traveled, and it would therefore not conflict or be  inconsistent with CEQA Guidelines Section 15064.3, subdivision (b); impacts would be less than  significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  52  c) Substantially increase hazards due to a geometric design feature (e.g., sharp curves or dangerous  intersections) or incompatible uses (e.g., farm equipment)?  No Impact. The Project would be implemented along an existing private access road, at the existing lift  station site, and on adjacent property within a decommissioned golf course. No work would occur within  a public roadway. Based on its location, design, and use, the Project would not increase hazards due to a  geometric design feature or incompatible use; no impacts would occur.   d) Result in inadequate emergency access?  No Impact. As discussed above in Item XVII(c), the Project would be implemented along an existing  private access road, at the existing lift station site, and on adjacent property within a decommissioned  golf course. The Project site does not provide emergency access. While construction vehicle parking may  be required along Par 4 Drive, access to residential driveways would be maintained. The Project would  therefore not result in inadequate emergency access and no impacts would occur.   XVIII. TRIBAL CULTURAL RESOURCES   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a  tribal cultural resource, defined in Public Resources Code  Section 21074 as either a site, feature, place, cultural  landscape that is geographically defined in terms of the  size and scope of the landscape, sacred place, or object  with cultural value to a California Native American tribe,  and that is:       i. Listed or eligible for listing in the California Register  of Historical Resources, or in a local register of  historical resources as defined in Public Resources  Code Section 5020.1(k), or  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  ii. A resource determined by the lead agency, in its  discretion and supported by substantial evidence, to  be significant pursuant to criteria set forth in  subdivision (c) of Public Resources Code  Section 5024.1. In applying the criteria set forth in  subdivision (c) of Public Resources Code  Section 5024.1, the lead agency shall consider the  significance of the resource to a California Native  American tribe.  ☐ ☒ ☐ ☐    a) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a tribal cultural resource, defined in Public  Resources Code Section 21074 as either a site, feature, place, cultural landscape that is  geographically defined in terms of the size and scope of the landscape, sacred place, or object with  cultural value to a California Native American tribe, and that is:  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  53  i. Listed or eligible for listing in the California Register of Historical Resources, or in a local register  of historical resources as defined in Public Resources Code Section 5020.1(k)?  No Impact. As discussed in Item V(a), one previously recorded resource, the Cottonwood Golf Club,  overlaps the Project site. This resource was documented and evaluated as part of a different project and  was found to be not eligible for the CRHR or San Diego County Local Register of Historic Resources  (Reinicke and Mengers 2020). No tribal cultural resources were identified within or adjacent to the  Project site during the records search, pedestrian survey, or tribal outreach that was conducted in  March 2021. Therefore, no substantial adverse changes to the significance of tribal cultural resources  listed or eligible for listing in the CRHR or local register of historical resources are anticipated as a result  of Project implementation; no impacts would occur.   ii. A resource determined by the lead agency, in its discretion and supported by substantial  evidence, to be significant pursuant to criteria set forth in subdivision (c) of Public Resources  Code Section 5024.1. In applying the criteria set forth in subdivision (c) of Public Resources Code  Section 5024.1, the lead agency shall consider the significance of the resource to a California  Native American tribe?  Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated. As discussed in Item V(b), no archaeological  resources have been recorded or are known to exist within the Project site or a half‐mile radius and no  resources were observed during the site visit. However, during the site visit, the Native American  monitor stated that due of the sensitivity of the region surrounding the Sweetwater River, and because  the existing lift station and sewer line may not have been monitored at the time of construction, that  the Jamul Indian Village requests cultural resource monitoring to be performed during ground‐ disturbance activities. In addition, the NAHC indicated that the results of the Sacred Lands File search  conducted for the Project were positive and that the Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, the  Kwaaymii Laguna Band of Mission Indians, and the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians should be  contacted for more information. A list of tribal contacts from whom additional information can be  solicited was provided with the NAHC’s response–letters were sent to these contacts on March 23,  2021. To date, one response has been received: the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians stated that the  area containing the Project site has cultural significance or ties to Viejas. Viejas requested that a  Kumeyaay Native American monitor be on site for ground‐disturbing activities and to be informed of any  discoveries found during construction. Therefore, though not anticipated, the Project could cause a  substantial adverse change in the significance of unknown tribal cultural resources during ground‐ disturbing activities, and impacts are considered potentially significant. Mitigation measure MM‐CUL‐1,  included above in Item V(b), would be required.   Mitigation Mitigation measure MM‐CUL‐1 would be required to reduce potential impacts to tribal cultural  resources to a less‐than‐significant level.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  54  XIX. UTILITIES AND SERVICE SYSTEMS   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  Would the Project:      a) Require or result in the relocation or construction of new  or expanded water, wastewater treatment or storm  water drainage, electric power, natural gas, or  telecommunications facilities, the construction or  relocation of which could cause significant environmental  effects?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  b) Have sufficient water supplies available to serve the  Project and reasonably foreseeable future development  during normal, dry and multiple dry years?   ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  c) Result in a determination by the wastewater treatment  provider which serves or may serve the Project that it has  adequate capacity to serve the Project’s projected  demand in addition to the provider’s existing  commitments?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  d) Generate solid waste in excess of State or local standards,  or in excess of the capacity of local infrastructure, or  otherwise impair the attainment of solid waste reduction  goals?   ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  e) Comply with federal, state, and local management and  reduction statutes and regulations related to solid waste? ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒    a) Require or result in the relocation or construction of new or expanded water, wastewater treatment  or storm water drainage, electric power, natural gas, or telecommunications facilities, the  construction or relocation of which could cause significant environmental effects?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project involves the construction of a sewer lift station and associated  infrastructure. The environmental impacts of implementation of the Project are analyzed throughout  this IS. Because the Project would replace an existing lift station at the same general site location, the  Project would not require the relocation or construction of additional water, wastewater treatment or  stormwater drainage, electric power, natural gas, or telecommunications facilities that could cause  significant off‐site adverse effects. Impacts would be less than significant.   b) Have sufficient water supplies available to serve the Project and reasonably foreseeable future  development during normal, dry and multiple dry years?  Less Than Significant Impact. While operation of the Project as a sewer lift station would involve the  conveyance of wastewater, it would not involve the regular use of water. The Project’s water  requirements would be limited to short‐term construction‐related uses such as dust suppression. Based  on the minor extent of such uses, Project water requirements would be met through existing  entitlement, and impacts would be less than significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  55  c) Result in a determination by the wastewater treatment provider which serves or may serve the  Project that it has adequate capacity to serve the Project’s projected demand in addition to the  provider’s existing commitments?  No Impact. The Project involves the replacement of a lift station and would continue to convey  wastewater flows. The Project itself would not generate wastewater; therefore, the Project would not  affect wastewater treatment capacity and no impacts would occur.   d) Generate solid waste in excess of State or local standards, or in excess of the capacity of local  infrastructure, or otherwise impair the attainment of solid waste reduction goals?  Less Than Significant Impact. Solid waste generation during Project construction would be short‐term  and minimal. Construction debris (e.g., asphalt, material packaging) would be recycled, as feasible.  Excavated soil would either be taken by the adjacent golf course and/or hauled from the site and  disposed of at located approved for such use. Operation of the lift station would not generate solid  waste or affect landfill capacities. As such, impacts would be less than significant.   e) Comply with federal, state, and local management and reduction statutes and regulations related to  solid waste?  No Impact. Construction and operation of the Project would generate minimal solid waste and would  not affect landfill capacity. The Project would comply with applicable federal, state, and local statues  and regulations related to solid waste. As such, no impact would occur.   XX. WILDFIRE   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  If located in or near state responsibility areas or lands  classified as very high fire hazard severity zones, would the  Project:       a) Substantially impair an adopted emergency response plan  or emergency evacuation plan?  ☐ ☐ ☐ ☒  b) Due to slope, prevailing winds, and other factors,  exacerbate wildfire risks, and thereby expose Project  occupants to, pollutant concentrations from a wildfire or  the uncontrolled spread of a wildfire?  ☐ ☒ ☐ ☐  c) Require the installation or maintenance of associated  infrastructure (such as roads, fuel breaks, emergency  water sources, power lines or other utilities) that may  exacerbate fire risk or that may result in temporary or  ongoing impacts to the environment?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  d) Expose people or structures to significant risks, including  downslope or downstream flooding or landslides, as a  result of runoff, post‐fire slope instability, or drainage  changes?   ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  56  As discussed in Item IX(g), the Project site is within an area mapped as a very high fire hazard severity  zone by CAL FIRE (2020).   a) Substantially impair an adopted emergency response plan or emergency evacuation plan?  No Impact. Project implementation would occur within OWD’s existing access road and lift station site  and within adjacent decommissioned golf course land. The Project would not occur within or affect  public roadways and would therefore not impair an adopted emergency response plan or emergency  evacuation plan. No impact would occur.   b) Due to slope, prevailing winds, and other factors, exacerbate wildfire risks, and thereby expose  Project occupants to, pollutant concentrations from a wildfire or the uncontrolled spread of a  wildfire?  Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated. As discussed in Item IX(g), the Project, as a lift  station, would not introduce permanent occupants to the site. Temporary construction workers and  occasional operational maintenance workers would not be present for extended periods of time and  would therefore not be at substantial risk from pollutant concentrations from a wildfire or the  uncontrolled spread of a wildfire; however, because the Project is within a very high fire hazard severity  zone, risk from wildfire does exist, most notably during the Project’s construction period when  equipment with combustion engines would be present. As such, impacts are considered potentially  significant. Mitigation measure MM‐HAZFIRE‐1 would be implemented during Project construction,  which would result in less than significant impacts.   Mitigation Mitigation measure MM‐HAZFIRE‐1 would be required to reduce potential impacts related to wildfire to  a less‐than‐significant level.   c) Require the installation or maintenance of associated infrastructure (such as roads, fuel breaks,  emergency water sources, power lines or other utilities) that may exacerbate fire risk or that may  result in temporary or ongoing impacts to the environment?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project involves the replacement of a lift station and associated  infrastructure, including an access road. Similar to the existing condition, the access road would be used  for occasional maintenance vehicle trips, which would not exacerbate fire risk. The temporary and  ongoing impacts to the environment from implementation of the Project are analyzed throughout this  IS. Impacts would be less than significant.   d) Expose people or structures to significant risks, including downslope or downstream flooding or  landslides, as a result of runoff, post‐fire slope instability, or drainage changes?  Less Than Significant Impact. The Project site is not located in an area of high risk of landslides or  flooding (refer to Items VII[a.iv] and X[b], respectively); therefore, the Project is not anticipated to  expose people or structures to significant risks as a result of runoff, post‐fire slope instability, or  drainage changes. Impacts would be less than significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  57  XXI. MANDATORY FINDINGS OF SIGNIFICANCE   Potentially  Significant  Impact  Less Than  Significant  with  Mitigation  Incorporated  Less Than  Significant  Impact  No  Impact  a) Does the Project have the potential to substantially  degrade the quality of the environment, substantially  reduce the habitat of a fish or wildlife species, cause a fish  or wildlife population to drop below self‐sustaining levels,  threaten to eliminate a plant or animal community,  substantially reduce the number or restrict the range of a  rare or endangered plant or animal or eliminate  important examples of the major periods of California  history or prehistory?  ☐ ☒ ☐ ☐  b) Does the Project have impacts that are individually  limited, but cumulatively considerable? (“Cumulatively  considerable” means that the incremental effects of a  project are significant when viewed in connection with  the effects of past projects, the effects of other current  projects, and the effects of past, present and probable  future projects)?  ☐ ☐ ☒ ☐  c) Does the Project have environmental effects which will  cause substantial adverse effects on human beings, either  directly or indirectly?  ☐ ☒ ☐ ☐    a) Does the Project have the potential to substantially degrade the quality of the environment,  substantially reduce the habitat of a fish or wildlife species, cause a fish or wildlife population to  drop below self‐sustaining levels, threaten to eliminate a plant or animal community, substantially  reduce the number or restrict the range of a rare or endangered plant or animal or eliminate  important examples of the major periods of California history or prehistory?   Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated. As discussed in Item IV(a), one special‐status plant  species (San Diego ambrosia), two special‐status animal species (Cooper’s hawk and coastal California  gnatcatcher), and bird/raptors protected under the MBTA have the potential to be directly and/or  indirectly affected during construction of the proposed Project. Potential impacts to San Diego ambrosia  would be reduced to a less‐than‐significant level through implementation of avoidance measures  required as part of mitigation measure MM‐BIO‐1. Potential indirect noise‐related impacts to coastal  California gnatcatcher would be reduced to a less‐than‐significant level through a pre‐construction  survey and restrictions on vegetation clearing and noise generation during the breeding season, as  required per mitigation measure MM‐BIO‐2. Similarly, potential impacts to Cooper’s hawk and other  birds/raptors protected under the MBTA would be reduced to a less‐than‐significant level through  restrictions on vegetation clearing during the general avian breeding season and pre‐construction  surveys, as specified in mitigation measure MM‐BIO‐3. No sensitive vegetation communities, habitat  types, or jurisdictional features occur within the Project footprint. The Project site does not serve as a  wildlife corridor; therefore, the Project would not affect wildlife movement or nursery sites.   As discussed in Item V(a), the Project would not result in a substantial adverse change in the significance  of a historical resources and would therefore not eliminate important examples of the major periods of  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  58  California history. Based on the cultural sensitivity of the area, the Project is considered to have the  potential to encounter and disturb unknown archaeological resource, tribal cultural resources, and  human remains during ground‐disturbing activities, which could result in effects to examples of major  periods of California prehistory. However, the Project would implement mitigation measures MM‐CUL‐1  and MM‐CUL‐2 to avoid such impacts through monitoring.   As such, with the inclusion of mitigation, the Project does not have the potential to substantially  degrade the quality of the environment, substantially reduce the habitat of a fish or wildlife species,  cause a fish or wildlife population to drop below self‐sustaining levels, threaten to eliminate a plant or  animal community, substantially reduce the number or restrict the range of a rare or endangered plant  or animal or eliminate important examples of the major periods of California history or prehistory.   Mitigation Mitigation measures MM‐BIO‐1, MM‐BIO‐2, MM‐BIO‐3, MM‐CUL‐1, and MM‐CUL‐2 would be required  to reduce impacts to biological resources, cultural resources, and tribal cultural resources to less‐than‐ significant levels.   b) Does the Project have impacts that are individually limited, but cumulatively considerable?  (“Cumulatively considerable” means that the incremental effects of a project are significant when  viewed in connection with the effects of past projects, the effects of other current projects, and the  effects of past, present and probable future projects)?  Less Than Significant Impact. Cumulative impacts are defined as two or more individual project effects  that, when considered together or in concert with other projects, combine to result in a significant  impact (CEQA Guidelines Section 15355). One project, the Cottonwood Sand Mine Project (State  Clearinghouse No. 2019100513), is proposed adjacent to the Project. The project area for the  Cottonwood Sand Mine Project would occur approximately 300 feet from Project site at its closest point;  however, most of the activity associated with the Cottonwood Sand Mine Project would occur at  distances much greater than 300 feet based on the large size of the site. While in proximity, the  proposed lift station replacement Project, which is primarily limited to short‐term and localized  construction‐related effects, would not result in impacts that are cumulatively considerable. No  significant air pollutant or GHG emissions would occur, no sensitive habitat would be removed, impacts  to known buried cultural resources would be avoided through construction monitoring, and noise  effects would be limited through implementation of noise abatement measures. Impacts would be less  than significant.   c) Does the Project have environmental effects which will cause substantial adverse effects on human  beings, either directly or indirectly?  Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated. Adherence to regulatory codes, ordinances,  regulations, standards, and guidelines would limit the potential for substantial adverse effects on human  beings during Project construction and operation. Mitigation measure MM‐HAZFIRE‐1 would minimize  risks to Project construction and operational workers related to fire events at the Project site. Similarly,  mitigation measures MM‐NOI‐1, MM‐NOI‐2, and MM‐NOI‐3 would reduce potential impacts to nearby  residents related to Project‐generated noise to less‐than‐significant levels. In addition, all resource  topics associated with the Project have been analyzed in accordance with State CEQA Guidelines and  found to pose no impact, less than significant impact, or less than significant impact with mitigation.  Further environmental analysis is not required. Impacts would be less than significant.   Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  59  Mitigation Mitigation measures MM‐HAZFIRE‐1, MM‐NOI‐1, MM‐NOI‐2, and MM‐NOI‐3 would be required to  reduce impacts related to fire risk and noise generation to less‐than‐significant levels.     3.0 PREPARERS Hunter Stapp Project Manager   Andrea Bitterling Principal‐in‐Charge  Joanne Dramko, AICP Quality Assurance Reviewer  Daniel Young GIS Specialist   Mandy Mathews Biologist  Stacie Wilson, RPA Senior Archaeologist  James Turner, RPA Archaeologist        Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  60  4.0 REFERENCES California Air Resources Board (CARB). 2005. Air Quality and Land Use Handbook: A Community Health  Perspective. April.   California Department of Conservation. 2016. California Important Farmland Finder. Available at:  https://maps.conservation.ca.gov/DLRP/CIFF/. Accessed March 2021.   2015. California Geological Survey Information Warehouse: Regulatory Maps. Available at:  https://maps.conservation.ca.gov/cgs/informationwarehouse/index.html?  map=regulatorymaps. Accessed March 2021.  California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE). 2020. Fire Hazard Severity Zone  Viewer. Available at: https://egis.fire.ca.gov/FHSZ/.   California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). EnviroStor. Available at:  https://www.envirostor.dtsc.ca.gov/public/. Accessed March 2021.   California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). 2020. Transportation and Construction Vibration  Guidance Manual. April.   2019. California State Scenic Highway System Map. Available at:  https://caltrans.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=2e921695c43643b1aaf70 00dfcc19983. Accessed March 2021.  California Geological Survey. 2017. Special Report 240 Update of Mineral Land Classification: Portland  Cement Concrete‐Grade Aggregate in The Western San Diego County Production‐Consumption  Region, California.   Faber‐Langendoen, D., J. Nichols, L. Master, K. Snow, A. Tomaino, R. Bittman, G. Hammerson, B. Heidel,  L. Ramsay, A. Teucher, and B. Young. 2012. NatureServe Conservation Status Assessments:  Methodology for Assigning Ranks, Revised Edition. June.  Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). 2012. Flood Insurance Rate Map – San Diego County,  California and Incorporated Areas, Panel 1931 of 2375.   HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc. (HELIX). 2021a. Biological Assessment for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift  Station Replacement Project. June 25.   2021b. Cultural Resources Study for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project.  April 7.   2021c. Noise Impact Analysis for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project.  April 8.   Reinicke, Kris and Douglass Mengers. 2020. Historic Resources Evaluation Report for the Cottonwood  Sand Mine Project, San Diego County, California. Prepared for the County of San Diego  Department of Planning and Land Use. PanGIS: San Diego, California.  Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  61  San Diego, County of. 2020. County of San Diego BMP Design Manual. September 15.   2011. San Diego County General Plan. August 3.   2007. Guidelines for Determining Significance, Paleontological Resources. March 19. Modified  January 15, 2009.   San Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDAPCD). 2020. 2020 Plan for Attaining the National Ambient Air  Quality Standards for Ozone in San Diego County. October.   2019. South Coast AQMD Air Quality Significance Thresholds. April. Available at:  http://www.aqmd.gov/docs/default‐source/ceqa/handbook/scaqmd‐air‐quality‐significance‐ thresholds.pdf?sfvrsn=2.   2017. Attainment Status. Available at: https://www.sdapcd.org/content/sdc/apcd/en/air‐ quality‐planning/attainment‐status.html.   SanGIS. 2012. SanGIS Interactive Map. Available at: https://www.sangis.org/.   State Water Resources Control Board. 2021. GeoTracker. Available at:  https://geotracker.waterboards.ca.gov/. Accessed March 2021.     Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021  62                                        This page intentionally left blank  Initial Study Appendix A Air Quality Modeling Outputs This page intentionally left blank CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 1 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement San Diego County, Winter 1.0 Project Characteristics 1.1 Land Usage Land Uses Size Metric Lot Acreage Floor Surface Area Population User Defined Industrial 1.00 User Defined Unit 0.37 16,117.00 0 1.2 Other Project Characteristics Urbanization Urban Wind Speed (m/s) 2.6 Precipitation Freq (Days) 40 Climate Zone 13 Operational Year 2023 Utility Company San Diego Gas & Electric CO2 Intensity 539.98 CH4 Intensity 0.033 N2O Intensity 0.004 (lb/MWhr) (lb/MWhr) (lb/MWhr) 1.3 User Entered Comments & Non-Default Data Project Characteristics - Land Use - User Defined Industrial Used for Lift Station. Project site area = 0.37 acre (16,117 SF). Construction Phase - Construction phasing information provided by Project Applicant. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant; off-highway truck = dump truck. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant. Off-road Equipment - Off-site (on-road) trucks only for material export. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant; off-highway trucks = 1 concrete pump truck, 1 concrete mixer truck, 1 dump truck. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant; off-highway truck = dump truck. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant. Grading - Model-calculated changes to total acres graded. CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 2 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Demolition - Demolition of existing lift station structure; estimated to have an area of 180 SF based on Google Earth imagery. Trips and VMT - 1,500 CY of material to be exported via 200 haull truck trips over 10 days. Vehicle Trips - One maintenance visit (2 one-way trips) per day per Project Applicant. Area Coating - No architectural coatings. Energy Use - 70 kWh per day per Project Applicant. Stationary Sources - Emergency Generators and Fire Pumps - Backup generator. Size based on two 40 hp pumps and this source: <https://franklinwater.com/more/service/aim-manual/motor-application/all-motors/page-5/> Construction Off-road Equipment Mitigation - Standard dust control measures. Table Name Column Name Default Value New Value tblAreaCoating Area_Nonresidential_Exterior 8059 0 tblAreaCoating Area_Nonresidential_Interior 24176 0 tblConstDustMitigation WaterUnpavedRoadMoistureContent 0 12 tblConstDustMitigation WaterUnpavedRoadVehicleSpeed 0 15 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 100.00 120.00 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 2.00 35.00 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 1.00 10.00 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 2.00 10.00 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 100.00 70.00 tblConstructionPhase PhaseEndDate 2/28/2024 5/24/2024 tblConstructionPhase PhaseEndDate 10/11/2023 11/24/2023 tblConstructionPhase PhaseEndDate 3/6/2024 9/20/2024 tblConstructionPhase PhaseEndDate 10/9/2023 10/6/2023 tblConstructionPhase PhaseStartDate 10/12/2023 12/11/2023 tblConstructionPhase PhaseStartDate 10/10/2023 10/9/2023 tblConstructionPhase PhaseStartDate 2/29/2024 9/16/2024 tblConstructionPhase PhaseStartDate 10/7/2023 9/25/2023 tblEnergyUse T24E 0.00 1.59 tblGrading AcresOfGrading 0.00 1.50 tblGrading AcresOfGrading 0.00 0.50 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 3 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied tblGrading AcresOfGrading 0.00 7.50 tblGrading MaterialExported 0.00 1,500.00 tblLandUse LandUseSquareFeet 0.00 16,117.00 tblLandUse LotAcreage 0.00 0.37 tblOffRoadEquipment HorsePower 46.00 97.00 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.45 0.37 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.37 0.37 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.38 0.38 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.38 0.38 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.50 0.50 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.38 0.38 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.37 0.37 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes Welders tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Off-Highway Trucks tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Skid Steer Loaders tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Excavators tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Off-Highway Trucks tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Trenchers tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Off-Highway Trucks tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Skid Steer Loaders tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 4.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 2.00 1.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 2.00 1.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 2.00 1.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 4 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 2.00 1.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsEF CH4_EF 0.07 0.07 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsEF ROG_EF 2.2480e-003 2.2477e-003 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsUse HorsePowerValue 0.00 270.00 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsUse HoursPerDay 0.00 0.25 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsUse HoursPerYear 0.00 50.00 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsUse NumberOfEquipment 0.00 1.00 tblTripsAndVMT HaulingTripNumber 188.00 0.00 tblTripsAndVMT HaulingTripNumber 0.00 200.00 tblTripsAndVMT HaulingVehicleClass HHDT tblVehicleTrips CW_TTP 0.00 100.00 tblVehicleTrips PR_TP 0.00 100.00 tblVehicleTrips ST_TR 0.00 2.00 tblVehicleTrips SU_TR 0.00 2.00 tblVehicleTrips WD_TR 0.00 2.00 2.0 Emissions Summary CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 5 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 2.1 Overall Construction (Maximum Daily Emission) Unmitigated Construction ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Year lb/day lb/day 2023 2.2958 18.3171 16.7348 0.0515 0.8200 0.8154 0.8933 0.1191 0.7502 0.7713 0.0000 4,995.258 7 4,995.258 7 1.5817 0.2121 5,038.081 3 2024 2.2436 17.2169 16.5785 0.0515 0.0854 0.7597 0.8375 0.0211 0.6989 0.7200 0.0000 4,994.410 0 4,994.410 0 1.5821 0.0108 5,037.165 6 Maximum 2.2958 18.3171 16.7348 0.0515 0.8200 0.8154 0.8933 0.1191 0.7502 0.7713 0.0000 4,995.258 7 4,995.258 7 1.5821 0.2121 5,038.081 3 Mitigated Construction ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Year lb/day lb/day 2023 2.2958 18.3171 16.7348 0.0515 0.4387 0.8154 0.8933 0.1159 0.7502 0.7713 0.0000 4,995.258 7 4,995.258 7 1.5817 0.2121 5,038.081 3 2024 2.2436 17.2169 16.5785 0.0515 0.0778 0.7597 0.8375 0.0211 0.6989 0.7200 0.0000 4,994.410 0 4,994.410 0 1.5821 0.0108 5,037.165 6 Maximum 2.2958 18.3171 16.7348 0.0515 0.4387 0.8154 0.8933 0.1159 0.7502 0.7713 0.0000 4,995.258 7 4,995.258 7 1.5821 0.2121 5,038.081 3 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 6 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio-CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N20 CO2e Percent Reduction 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 42.96 0.00 0.00 2.28 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.2 Overall Operational Unmitigated Operational ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Area 0.3449 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.2000e- 004 2.2000e- 004 0.0000 2.3000e- 004 Energy 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Mobile 6.5200e-7.9000e-0.0648 1.4000e-0.0146 1.1000e-0.0147 3.8800e-1.0000e-3.9800e-14.0148 14.0148 9.7000e-6.2000e-14.2247 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 Stationary 0.1108 0.3096 0.2825 5.3000e- 004 0.0163 0.0163 0.0163 0.0163 56.6672 56.6672 7.9400e- 003 56.8658 Total 0.4622 0.3175 0.3474 6.7000e- 004 0.0146 0.0164 0.0310 3.8800e- 003 0.0164 0.0203 70.6822 70.6822 8.9100e- 003 6.2000e- 004 71.0907 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 7 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 2.2 Overall Operational Mitigated Operational ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Area 0.3449 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.2000e- 004 2.2000e- 004 0.0000 2.3000e- 004 Energy 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Mobile 6.5200e-7.9000e-0.0648 1.4000e-0.0146 1.1000e-0.0147 3.8800e-1.0000e-3.9800e-14.0148 14.0148 9.7000e-6.2000e-14.2247 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 Stationary 0.1108 0.3096 0.2825 5.3000e- 004 0.0163 0.0163 0.0163 0.0163 56.6672 56.6672 7.9400e- 003 56.8658 Total 0.4622 0.3175 0.3474 6.7000e- 004 0.0146 0.0164 0.0310 3.8800e- 003 0.0164 0.0203 70.6822 70.6822 8.9100e- 003 6.2000e- 004 71.0907 ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio-CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N20 CO2e Percent Reduction 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.0 Construction Detail Construction Phase Phase Number Phase Name Phase Type Start Date End Date Num Days Week Num Days Phase Description 1 Site Preparation Site Preparation 9/25/2023 10/6/2023 5 10 2 Excavation Grading 10/9/2023 11/24/2023 5 35 3 Building Construction Building Construction 12/11/2023 5/24/2024 5 120 4 Paving Paving 9/16/2024 9/20/2024 5 5 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 8 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 5 Excavated Material Hauling Trenching 11/13/2023 11/24/2023 5 10 6 Light Grading Grading 11/27/2023 12/8/2023 5 10 7 Demolition Demolition 9/2/2024 9/13/2024 5 10 8 Facilities Installation Building Construction 5/27/2024 8/30/2024 5 70 Acres of Grading (Site Preparation Phase): 0.5 Acres of Grading (Grading Phase): 1.5 Acres of Paving: 0 Residential Indoor: 0; Residential Outdoor: 0; Non-Residential Indoor: 0; Non-Residential Outdoor: 0; Striped Parking Area: 0 (Architectural Coating – sqft) OffRoad Equipment Phase Name Offroad Equipment Type Amount Usage Hours Horse Power Load Factor Facilities Installation Cranes 1 4.00 231 0.29 Paving Cement and Mortar Mixers 0 6.00 9 0.56 Demolition Concrete/Industrial Saws 1 8.00 81 0.73 Building Construction Cranes 1 4.00 231 0.29 Building Construction Forklifts 1 6.00 89 0.20 Excavation Graders 0 6.00 187 0.41 Site Preparation Graders 0 8.00 187 0.41 Paving Pavers 1 7.00 130 0.42 Paving Rollers 1 7.00 80 0.38 Demolition Rubber Tired Dozers 0 1.00 247 0.40 Excavation Rubber Tired Dozers 0 6.00 247 0.40 Building Construction Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 1 8.00 97 0.37 Demolition Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 1 6.00 97 0.37 Excavation Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 1 7.00 97 0.37 Paving Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 0 7.00 97 0.37 Site Preparation Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 0 8.00 97 0.37 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 9 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Facilities Installation Forklifts 1 6.00 89 0.20 Light Grading Graders 0 6.00 187 0.41 Light Grading Rubber Tired Dozers 0 6.00 247 0.40 Facilities Installation Welders 1 8.00 97 0.37 Light Grading Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 0 7.00 97 0.37 Demolition Off-Highway Trucks 1 8.00 402 0.38 Site Preparation Skid Steer Loaders 1 8.00 65 0.37 Excavation Excavators 1 8.00 158 0.38 Excavation Off-Highway Trucks 1 8.00 402 0.38 Building Construction Trenchers 1 8.00 78 0.50 Building Construction Off-Highway Trucks 3 8.00 402 0.38 Light Grading Skid Steer Loaders 1 8.00 65 0.37 Trips and VMT Phase Name Offroad Equipment Count Worker Trip Number Vendor Trip Number Hauling Trip Number Worker Trip Length Vendor Trip Length Hauling Trip Length Worker Vehicle Class Vendor Vehicle Class Hauling Vehicle Class Demolition 3 8.00 0.00 1.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Site Preparation 1 3.00 0.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Excavation 3 8.00 0.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Building Construction 7 7.00 3.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Paving 2 5.00 0.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Excavated Material Hauling 0 0.00 200.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 HHDT Light Grading 1 3.00 0.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Facilities Installation 3 7.00 3.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT 3.1 Mitigation Measures Construction Water Exposed Area Water Unpaved Roads CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 10 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Reduce Vehicle Speed on Unpaved Roads 3.2 Site Preparation - 2023 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Fugitive Dust 0.0530 0.0000 0.0530 5.7300e- 003 0.0000 5.7300e- 003 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.0648 0.8612 1.3798 2.0600e- 003 0.0291 0.0291 0.0268 0.0268 199.6735 199.6735 0.0646 201.2879 Total 0.0648 0.8612 1.3798 2.0600e- 003 0.0530 0.0291 0.0822 5.7300e- 003 0.0268 0.0325 199.6735 199.6735 0.0646 201.2879 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 11 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.2 Site Preparation - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 8.9000e-5.7300e-0.0686 2.1000e-0.0246 1.3000e-0.0248 6.5400e-1.2000e-6.6600e-21.0606 21.0606 6.4000e-5.9000e-21.2533 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 Total 8.9000e-5.7300e-0.0686 2.1000e-0.0246 1.3000e-0.0248 6.5400e-1.2000e-6.6600e-21.0606 21.0606 6.4000e-5.9000e-21.2533 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Fugitive Dust 0.0239 0.0000 0.0239 2.5800e- 003 0.0000 2.5800e- 003 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.0648 0.8612 1.3798 2.0600e- 003 0.0291 0.0291 0.0268 0.0268 0.0000 199.6734 199.6734 0.0646 201.2879 Total 0.0648 0.8612 1.3798 2.0600e- 003 0.0239 0.0291 0.0530 2.5800e- 003 0.0268 0.0294 0.0000 199.6734 199.6734 0.0646 201.2879 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 12 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.2 Site Preparation - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 8.9000e-5.7300e-0.0686 2.1000e-0.0246 1.3000e-0.0248 6.5400e-1.2000e-6.6600e-21.0606 21.0606 6.4000e-5.9000e-21.2533 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 Total 8.9000e-5.7300e-0.0686 2.1000e-0.0246 1.3000e-0.0248 6.5400e-1.2000e-6.6600e-21.0606 21.0606 6.4000e-5.9000e-21.2533 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 3.3 Excavation - 2023 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Fugitive Dust 0.0515 0.0000 0.0515 5.8200e- 003 0.0000 5.8200e- 003 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.8285 6.4858 8.5314 0.0212 0.2722 0.2722 0.2504 0.2504 2,052.773 5 2,052.773 5 0.6639 2,069.371 3 Total 0.8285 6.4858 8.5314 0.0212 0.0515 0.2722 0.3237 5.8200e- 003 0.2504 0.2562 2,052.773 5 2,052.773 5 0.6639 2,069.371 3 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 13 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.3 Excavation - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0237 0.0153 0.1829 5.5000e- 004 0.0657 3.5000e- 004 0.0661 0.0174 3.3000e- 004 0.0178 56.1616 56.1616 1.6900e- 003 1.5800e- 003 56.6755 Total 0.0237 0.0153 0.1829 5.5000e- 004 0.0657 3.5000e- 004 0.0661 0.0174 3.3000e- 004 0.0178 56.1616 56.1616 1.6900e- 003 1.5800e- 003 56.6755 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Fugitive Dust 0.0232 0.0000 0.0232 2.6200e- 003 0.0000 2.6200e- 003 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.8285 6.4858 8.5314 0.0212 0.2722 0.2722 0.2504 0.2504 0.0000 2,052.773 5 2,052.773 5 0.6639 2,069.371 3 Total 0.8285 6.4858 8.5314 0.0212 0.0232 0.2722 0.2953 2.6200e- 003 0.2504 0.2530 0.0000 2,052.773 5 2,052.773 5 0.6639 2,069.371 3 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 14 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.3 Excavation - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0237 0.0153 0.1829 5.5000e- 004 0.0657 3.5000e- 004 0.0661 0.0174 3.3000e- 004 0.0178 56.1616 56.1616 1.6900e- 003 1.5800e- 003 56.6755 Total 0.0237 0.0153 0.1829 5.5000e- 004 0.0657 3.5000e- 004 0.0661 0.0174 3.3000e- 004 0.0178 56.1616 56.1616 1.6900e- 003 1.5800e- 003 56.6755 3.4 Building Construction - 2023 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Off-Road 2.2716 18.1697 16.5270 0.0504 0.8144 0.8144 0.7492 0.7492 4,879.708 9 4,879.708 9 1.5782 4,919.163 9 Total 2.2716 18.1697 16.5270 0.0504 0.8144 0.8144 0.7492 0.7492 4,879.708 9 4,879.708 9 1.5782 4,919.163 9 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 15 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.4 Building Construction - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 3.4800e-0.1340 0.0477 6.2000e-0.0203 7.9000e-0.0211 5.8500e-7.5000e-6.6000e-66.4084 66.4084 2.0000e-9.6200e-69.3264 003 004 004 003 004 003 003 003 Worker 0.0208 0.0134 0.1601 4.8000e- 004 0.0575 3.1000e- 004 0.0578 0.0153 2.8000e- 004 0.0155 49.1414 49.1414 1.4800e- 003 1.3800e- 003 49.5911 Total 0.0242 0.1474 0.2078 1.1000e- 003 0.0778 1.1000e- 003 0.0789 0.0211 1.0300e- 003 0.0221 115.5498 115.5498 3.4800e- 003 0.0110 118.9175 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Off-Road 2.2716 18.1697 16.5270 0.0504 0.8144 0.8144 0.7492 0.7492 0.0000 4,879.708 9 4,879.708 9 1.5782 4,919.163 9 Total 2.2716 18.1697 16.5270 0.0504 0.8144 0.8144 0.7492 0.7492 0.0000 4,879.708 9 4,879.708 9 1.5782 4,919.163 9 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 16 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.4 Building Construction - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 3.4800e-0.1340 0.0477 6.2000e-0.0203 7.9000e-0.0211 5.8500e-7.5000e-6.6000e-66.4084 66.4084 2.0000e-9.6200e-69.3264 003 004 004 003 004 003 003 003 Worker 0.0208 0.0134 0.1601 4.8000e- 004 0.0575 3.1000e- 004 0.0578 0.0153 2.8000e- 004 0.0155 49.1414 49.1414 1.4800e- 003 1.3800e- 003 49.5911 Total 0.0242 0.1474 0.2078 1.1000e- 003 0.0778 1.1000e- 003 0.0789 0.0211 1.0300e- 003 0.0221 115.5498 115.5498 3.4800e- 003 0.0110 118.9175 3.4 Building Construction - 2024 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Off-Road 2.2207 17.0717 16.3820 0.0504 0.7586 0.7586 0.6979 0.6979 4,881.245 9 4,881.245 9 1.5787 4,920.713 3 Total 2.2207 17.0717 16.3820 0.0504 0.7586 0.7586 0.6979 0.6979 4,881.245 9 4,881.245 9 1.5787 4,920.713 3 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 17 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.4 Building Construction - 2024 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 3.3400e-0.1331 0.0467 6.0000e-0.0203 7.9000e-0.0211 5.8500e-7.6000e-6.6100e-65.2532 65.2532 2.0500e-9.4600e-68.1222 003 004 004 003 004 003 003 003 Worker 0.0196 0.0120 0.1499 4.6000e- 004 0.0575 2.9000e- 004 0.0578 0.0153 2.7000e- 004 0.0155 47.9109 47.9109 1.3500e- 003 1.2900e- 003 48.3302 Total 0.0229 0.1451 0.1965 1.0600e- 003 0.0778 1.0800e- 003 0.0789 0.0211 1.0300e- 003 0.0221 113.1641 113.1641 3.4000e- 003 0.0108 116.4523 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Off-Road 2.2207 17.0717 16.3820 0.0504 0.7586 0.7586 0.6979 0.6979 0.0000 4,881.245 9 4,881.245 9 1.5787 4,920.713 3 Total 2.2207 17.0717 16.3820 0.0504 0.7586 0.7586 0.6979 0.6979 0.0000 4,881.245 9 4,881.245 9 1.5787 4,920.713 3 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 18 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.4 Building Construction - 2024 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 3.3400e-0.1331 0.0467 6.0000e-0.0203 7.9000e-0.0211 5.8500e-7.6000e-6.6100e-65.2532 65.2532 2.0500e-9.4600e-68.1222 003 004 004 003 004 003 003 003 Worker 0.0196 0.0120 0.1499 4.6000e- 004 0.0575 2.9000e- 004 0.0578 0.0153 2.7000e- 004 0.0155 47.9109 47.9109 1.3500e- 003 1.2900e- 003 48.3302 Total 0.0229 0.1451 0.1965 1.0600e- 003 0.0778 1.0800e- 003 0.0789 0.0211 1.0300e- 003 0.0221 113.1641 113.1641 3.4000e- 003 0.0108 116.4523 3.5 Paving - 2024 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Off-Road 0.2882 2.8579 4.1502 6.4100e- 003 0.1418 0.1418 0.1304 0.1304 620.6444 620.6444 0.2007 625.6626 Paving 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.2882 2.8579 4.1502 6.4100e- 003 0.1418 0.1418 0.1304 0.1304 620.6444 620.6444 0.2007 625.6626 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 19 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.5 Paving - 2024 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0140 8.5900e- 003 0.1071 3.3000e- 004 0.0411 2.1000e- 004 0.0413 0.0109 1.9000e- 004 0.0111 34.2220 34.2220 9.7000e- 004 9.2000e- 004 34.5216 Total 0.0140 8.5900e- 003 0.1071 3.3000e- 004 0.0411 2.1000e- 004 0.0413 0.0109 1.9000e- 004 0.0111 34.2220 34.2220 9.7000e- 004 9.2000e- 004 34.5216 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Off-Road 0.2882 2.8579 4.1502 6.4100e- 003 0.1418 0.1418 0.1304 0.1304 0.0000 620.6444 620.6444 0.2007 625.6626 Paving 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.2882 2.8579 4.1502 6.4100e- 003 0.1418 0.1418 0.1304 0.1304 0.0000 620.6444 620.6444 0.2007 625.6626 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 20 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.5 Paving - 2024 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0140 8.5900e- 003 0.1071 3.3000e- 004 0.0411 2.1000e- 004 0.0413 0.0109 1.9000e- 004 0.0111 34.2220 34.2220 9.7000e- 004 9.2000e- 004 34.5216 Total 0.0140 8.5900e- 003 0.1071 3.3000e- 004 0.0411 2.1000e- 004 0.0413 0.0109 1.9000e- 004 0.0111 34.2220 34.2220 9.7000e- 004 9.2000e- 004 34.5216 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 21 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.6 Excavated Material Hauling - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0426 2.7218 0.7277 0.0120 0.3498 0.0223 0.3721 0.0959 0.0213 0.1172 1,323.839 9 1,323.839 9 0.0665 0.2105 1,388.241 0 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0426 2.7218 0.7277 0.0120 0.3498 0.0223 0.3721 0.0959 0.0213 0.1172 1,323.839 9 1,323.839 9 0.0665 0.2105 1,388.241 0 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 22 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.6 Excavated Material Hauling - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0426 2.7218 0.7277 0.0120 0.3498 0.0223 0.3721 0.0959 0.0213 0.1172 1,323.839 9 1,323.839 9 0.0665 0.2105 1,388.241 0 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0426 2.7218 0.7277 0.0120 0.3498 0.0223 0.3721 0.0959 0.0213 0.1172 1,323.839 9 1,323.839 9 0.0665 0.2105 1,388.241 0 3.7 Light Grading - 2023 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Fugitive Dust 0.7954 0.0000 0.7954 0.0859 0.0000 0.0859 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.0648 0.8612 1.3798 2.0600e- 003 0.0291 0.0291 0.0268 0.0268 199.6735 199.6735 0.0646 201.2879 Total 0.0648 0.8612 1.3798 2.0600e- 003 0.7954 0.0291 0.8245 0.0859 0.0268 0.1127 199.6735 199.6735 0.0646 201.2879 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 23 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.7 Light Grading - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 8.9000e-5.7300e-0.0686 2.1000e-0.0246 1.3000e-0.0248 6.5400e-1.2000e-6.6600e-21.0606 21.0606 6.4000e-5.9000e-21.2533 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 Total 8.9000e-5.7300e-0.0686 2.1000e-0.0246 1.3000e-0.0248 6.5400e-1.2000e-6.6600e-21.0606 21.0606 6.4000e-5.9000e-21.2533 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Fugitive Dust 0.3579 0.0000 0.3579 0.0387 0.0000 0.0387 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.0648 0.8612 1.3798 2.0600e- 003 0.0291 0.0291 0.0268 0.0268 0.0000 199.6734 199.6734 0.0646 201.2879 Total 0.0648 0.8612 1.3798 2.0600e- 003 0.3579 0.0291 0.3871 0.0387 0.0268 0.0655 0.0000 199.6734 199.6734 0.0646 201.2879 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 24 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.7 Light Grading - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 8.9000e-5.7300e-0.0686 2.1000e-0.0246 1.3000e-0.0248 6.5400e-1.2000e-6.6600e-21.0606 21.0606 6.4000e-5.9000e-21.2533 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 Total 8.9000e-5.7300e-0.0686 2.1000e-0.0246 1.3000e-0.0248 6.5400e-1.2000e-6.6600e-21.0606 21.0606 6.4000e-5.9000e-21.2533 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 3.8 Demolition - 2024 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Fugitive Dust 0.0179 0.0000 0.0179 2.7200e- 003 0.0000 2.7200e- 003 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.9178 6.8283 8.5770 0.0218 0.2802 0.2802 0.2666 0.2666 2,099.340 1 2,099.340 1 0.5155 2,112.226 3 Total 0.9178 6.8283 8.5770 0.0218 0.0179 0.2802 0.2982 2.7200e- 003 0.2666 0.2694 2,099.340 1 2,099.340 1 0.5155 2,112.226 3 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 25 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.8 Demolition - 2024 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 2.1000e-0.0135 3.6900e-6.0000e-1.7500e-1.1000e-1.8600e-4.8000e-1.1000e-5.9000e-6.5028 6.5028 3.4000e-1.0300e-6.8198 004 003 005 003 004 003 004 004 004 004 003 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0223 0.0137 0.1713 5.3000e- 004 0.0657 3.4000e- 004 0.0661 0.0174 3.1000e- 004 0.0177 54.7553 54.7553 1.5500e- 003 1.4800e- 003 55.2345 Total 0.0226 0.0272 0.1750 5.9000e- 004 0.0675 4.5000e- 004 0.0679 0.0179 4.2000e- 004 0.0183 61.2581 61.2581 1.8900e- 003 2.5100e- 003 62.0542 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Fugitive Dust 8.0700e- 003 0.0000 8.0700e- 003 1.2200e- 003 0.0000 1.2200e- 003 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.9178 6.8283 8.5770 0.0218 0.2802 0.2802 0.2666 0.2666 0.0000 2,099.340 1 2,099.340 1 0.5155 2,112.226 3 Total 0.9178 6.8283 8.5770 0.0218 8.0700e- 003 0.2802 0.2883 1.2200e- 003 0.2666 0.2679 0.0000 2,099.340 1 2,099.340 1 0.5155 2,112.226 3 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 26 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.8 Demolition - 2024 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 2.1000e-0.0135 3.6900e-6.0000e-1.7500e-1.1000e-1.8600e-4.8000e-1.1000e-5.9000e-6.5028 6.5028 3.4000e-1.0300e-6.8198 004 003 005 003 004 003 004 004 004 004 003 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0223 0.0137 0.1713 5.3000e- 004 0.0657 3.4000e- 004 0.0661 0.0174 3.1000e- 004 0.0177 54.7553 54.7553 1.5500e- 003 1.4800e- 003 55.2345 Total 0.0226 0.0272 0.1750 5.9000e- 004 0.0675 4.5000e- 004 0.0679 0.0179 4.2000e- 004 0.0183 61.2581 61.2581 1.8900e- 003 2.5100e- 003 62.0542 3.9 Facilities Installation - 2024 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Off-Road 0.4492 3.9530 3.9953 7.8300e- 003 0.1871 0.1871 0.1782 0.1782 750.1551 750.1551 0.1453 753.7866 Total 0.4492 3.9530 3.9953 7.8300e- 003 0.1871 0.1871 0.1782 0.1782 750.1551 750.1551 0.1453 753.7866 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 27 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.9 Facilities Installation - 2024 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 3.3400e-0.1331 0.0467 6.0000e-0.0203 7.9000e-0.0211 5.8500e-7.6000e-6.6100e-65.2532 65.2532 2.0500e-9.4600e-68.1222 003 004 004 003 004 003 003 003 Worker 0.0196 0.0120 0.1499 4.6000e- 004 0.0575 2.9000e- 004 0.0578 0.0153 2.7000e- 004 0.0155 47.9109 47.9109 1.3500e- 003 1.2900e- 003 48.3302 Total 0.0229 0.1451 0.1965 1.0600e- 003 0.0778 1.0800e- 003 0.0789 0.0211 1.0300e- 003 0.0221 113.1641 113.1641 3.4000e- 003 0.0108 116.4523 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Off-Road 0.4492 3.9530 3.9953 7.8300e- 003 0.1871 0.1871 0.1782 0.1782 0.0000 750.1551 750.1551 0.1453 753.7866 Total 0.4492 3.9530 3.9953 7.8300e- 003 0.1871 0.1871 0.1782 0.1782 0.0000 750.1551 750.1551 0.1453 753.7866 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 28 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.9 Facilities Installation - 2024 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 3.3400e-0.1331 0.0467 6.0000e-0.0203 7.9000e-0.0211 5.8500e-7.6000e-6.6100e-65.2532 65.2532 2.0500e-9.4600e-68.1222 003 004 004 003 004 003 003 003 Worker 0.0196 0.0120 0.1499 4.6000e- 004 0.0575 2.9000e- 004 0.0578 0.0153 2.7000e- 004 0.0155 47.9109 47.9109 1.3500e- 003 1.2900e- 003 48.3302 Total 0.0229 0.1451 0.1965 1.0600e- 003 0.0778 1.0800e- 003 0.0789 0.0211 1.0300e- 003 0.0221 113.1641 113.1641 3.4000e- 003 0.0108 116.4523 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 29 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 4.0 Operational Detail - Mobile 4.1 Mitigation Measures Mobile ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Mitigated 6.5200e-7.9000e-0.0648 1.4000e-0.0146 1.1000e-0.0147 3.8800e-1.0000e-3.9800e-14.0148 14.0148 9.7000e-6.2000e-14.2247 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 Unmitigated 6.5200e-7.9000e-0.0648 1.4000e-0.0146 1.1000e-0.0147 3.8800e-1.0000e-3.9800e-14.0148 14.0148 9.7000e-6.2000e-14.2247 003 003 004 004 003 004 003 004 004 4.2 Trip Summary Information Average Daily Trip Rate Unmitigated Mitigated Land Use Weekday Saturday Sunday Annual VMT Annual VMT User Defined Industrial 2.00 2.00 2.00 6,916 6,916 Total 2.00 2.00 2.00 6,916 6,916 4.3 Trip Type Information Miles Trip % Trip Purpose % Land Use H-W or C-W H-S or C-C H-O or C-NW H-W or C-W H-S or C-C H-O or C-NW Primary Diverted Pass-by User Defined Industrial 9.50 7.30 7.30 100.00 0.00 0.00 100 0 0 4.4 Fleet Mix Land Use LDA LDT1 LDT2 MDV LHD1 LHD2 MHD HHD OBUS UBUS MCY SBUS MH User Defined Industrial 0.553514 0.062792 0.181046 0.120736 0.024419 0.006214 0.008493 0.006184 0.000715 0.000556 0.029185 0.000982 0.005164 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 30 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 5.0 Energy Detail Historical Energy Use: N 5.1 Mitigation Measures Energy ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day NaturalGas Mitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 NaturalGas Unmitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 5.2 Energy by Land Use - NaturalGas Unmitigated NaturalGa s Use ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use kBTU/yr lb/day lb/day User Defined Industrial 0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 31 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 5.2 Energy by Land Use - NaturalGas Mitigated NaturalGa s Use ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use kBTU/yr lb/day lb/day User Defined Industrial 0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 6.0 Area Detail 6.1 Mitigation Measures Area ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category lb/day lb/day Mitigated 0.3449 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.2000e- 004 2.2000e- 004 0.0000 2.3000e- 004 Unmitigated 0.3449 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.2000e- 004 2.2000e- 004 0.0000 2.3000e- 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 32 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 6.2 Area by SubCategory Unmitigated ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e SubCategory lb/day lb/day Architectural Coating 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Consumer Products 0.3449 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Landscaping 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.2000e- 004 2.2000e- 004 0.0000 2.3000e- 004 Total 0.3449 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.2000e- 004 2.2000e- 004 0.0000 2.3000e- 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 33 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 6.2 Area by SubCategory Mitigated ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e SubCategory lb/day lb/day Architectural Coating 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Consumer Products 0.3449 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Landscaping 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.2000e- 004 2.2000e- 004 0.0000 2.3000e- 004 Total 0.3449 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.2000e- 004 2.2000e- 004 0.0000 2.3000e- 004 7.0 Water Detail 7.1 Mitigation Measures Water 8.0 Waste Detail 8.1 Mitigation Measures Waste 9.0 Operational Offroad Equipment Type Number Hours/Day Days/Year Horse Power Load Factor Fuel Type 10.0 Stationary Equipment Fire Pumps and Emergency Generators CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 34 of 34 Date: 7/20/2021 1:19 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Winter EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Equipment Type Number Hours/Day Hours/Year Horse Power Load Factor Fuel Type Emergency Generator 1 0.25 50 270 0.73 Diesel Boilers Equipment Type Number Heat Input/Day Heat Input/Year Boiler Rating Fuel Type User Defined Equipment Equipment Type Number 10.1 Stationary Sources Unmitigated/Mitigated ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Equipment Type lb/day lb/day Emergency 0.1108 0.3096 0.2825 5.3000e-0.0163 0.0163 0.0163 0.0163 56.6672 56.6672 7.9400e-56.8658 Generator -004 003 Diesel (175 - 300 HP) Total 0.1108 0.3096 0.2825 5.3000e- 004 0.0163 0.0163 0.0163 0.0163 56.6672 56.6672 7.9400e- 003 56.8658 11.0 Vegetation CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 1 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement San Diego County, Annual 1.0 Project Characteristics 1.1 Land Usage Land Uses Size Metric Lot Acreage Floor Surface Area Population User Defined Industrial 1.00 User Defined Unit 0.37 16,117.00 0 1.2 Other Project Characteristics Urbanization Urban Wind Speed (m/s) 2.6 Precipitation Freq (Days) 40 Climate Zone 13 Operational Year 2023 Utility Company San Diego Gas & Electric CO2 Intensity 539.98 CH4 Intensity 0.033 N2O Intensity 0.004 (lb/MWhr) (lb/MWhr) (lb/MWhr) 1.3 User Entered Comments & Non-Default Data Project Characteristics - Land Use - User Defined Industrial Used for Lift Station. Project site area = 0.37 acre (16,117 SF). Construction Phase - Construction phasing information provided by Project Applicant. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant; off-highway truck = dump truck. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant. Off-road Equipment - Off-site (on-road) trucks only for material export. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant; off-highway trucks = 1 concrete pump truck, 1 concrete mixer truck, 1 dump truck. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant; off-highway truck = dump truck. Off-road Equipment - Construction equipment per Project Applicant. Grading - Model-calculated changes to total acres graded. CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 2 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Demolition - Demolition of existing lift station structure; estimated to have an area of 180 SF based on Google Earth imagery. Trips and VMT - 1,500 CY of material to be exported via 200 haull truck trips over 10 days. Vehicle Trips - One maintenance visit (2 one-way trips) per day per Project Applicant. Area Coating - No architectural coatings. Energy Use - 70 kWh per day per Project Applicant. Stationary Sources - Emergency Generators and Fire Pumps - Backup generator. Size based on two 40 hp pumps and this source: <https://franklinwater.com/more/service/aim-manual/motor-application/all-motors/page-5/> Construction Off-road Equipment Mitigation - Standard dust control measures. Table Name Column Name Default Value New Value tblAreaCoating Area_Nonresidential_Exterior 8059 0 tblAreaCoating Area_Nonresidential_Interior 24176 0 tblConstDustMitigation WaterUnpavedRoadMoistureContent 0 12 tblConstDustMitigation WaterUnpavedRoadVehicleSpeed 0 15 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 100.00 120.00 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 2.00 35.00 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 1.00 10.00 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 2.00 10.00 tblConstructionPhase NumDays 100.00 70.00 tblConstructionPhase PhaseEndDate 2/28/2024 5/24/2024 tblConstructionPhase PhaseEndDate 10/11/2023 11/24/2023 tblConstructionPhase PhaseEndDate 3/6/2024 9/20/2024 tblConstructionPhase PhaseEndDate 10/9/2023 10/6/2023 tblConstructionPhase PhaseStartDate 10/12/2023 12/11/2023 tblConstructionPhase PhaseStartDate 10/10/2023 10/9/2023 tblConstructionPhase PhaseStartDate 2/29/2024 9/16/2024 tblConstructionPhase PhaseStartDate 10/7/2023 9/25/2023 tblEnergyUse T24E 0.00 1.59 tblGrading AcresOfGrading 0.00 1.50 tblGrading AcresOfGrading 0.00 0.50 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 3 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied tblGrading AcresOfGrading 0.00 7.50 tblGrading MaterialExported 0.00 1,500.00 tblLandUse LandUseSquareFeet 0.00 16,117.00 tblLandUse LotAcreage 0.00 0.37 tblOffRoadEquipment HorsePower 46.00 97.00 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.45 0.37 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.37 0.37 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.38 0.38 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.38 0.38 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.50 0.50 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.38 0.38 tblOffRoadEquipment LoadFactor 0.37 0.37 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes Welders tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Off-Highway Trucks tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Skid Steer Loaders tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Excavators tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Off-Highway Trucks tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Trenchers tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Off-Highway Trucks tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentType Skid Steer Loaders tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 4.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 2.00 1.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 2.00 1.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 2.00 1.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 4 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 2.00 1.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblOffRoadEquipment OffRoadEquipmentUnitAmount 1.00 0.00 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsEF CH4_EF 0.07 0.07 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsEF ROG_EF 2.2480e-003 2.2477e-003 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsUse HorsePowerValue 0.00 270.00 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsUse HoursPerDay 0.00 0.25 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsUse HoursPerYear 0.00 50.00 tblStationaryGeneratorsPumpsUse NumberOfEquipment 0.00 1.00 tblTripsAndVMT HaulingTripNumber 188.00 0.00 tblTripsAndVMT HaulingTripNumber 0.00 200.00 tblTripsAndVMT HaulingVehicleClass HHDT tblVehicleTrips CW_TTP 0.00 100.00 tblVehicleTrips PR_TP 0.00 100.00 tblVehicleTrips ST_TR 0.00 2.00 tblVehicleTrips SU_TR 0.00 2.00 tblVehicleTrips WD_TR 0.00 2.00 2.0 Emissions Summary CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 5 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 2.1 Overall Construction Unmitigated Construction ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Year tons/yr MT/yr 2023 0.0330 0.2734 0.2961 8.5000e- 004 8.7900e- 003 0.0113 0.0201 1.5500e- 003 0.0104 0.0119 0.0000 75.4842 75.4842 0.0222 1.0600e- 003 76.3554 2024 0.1396 1.0887 1.0714 3.1400e- 003 7.1700e- 003 0.0482 0.0554 1.9400e- 003 0.0446 0.0466 0.0000 276.5990 276.5990 0.0829 8.6000e- 004 278.9285 Maximum 0.1396 1.0887 1.0714 3.1400e- 003 8.7900e- 003 0.0482 0.0554 1.9400e- 003 0.0446 0.0466 0.0000 276.5990 276.5990 0.0829 1.0600e- 003 278.9285 Mitigated Construction ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Year tons/yr MT/yr 2023 0.0330 0.2734 0.2961 8.5000e- 004 5.9600e- 003 0.0113 0.0173 1.2400e- 003 0.0104 0.0116 0.0000 75.4841 75.4841 0.0222 1.0600e- 003 76.3553 2024 0.1396 1.0887 1.0714 3.1400e- 003 7.1200e- 003 0.0482 0.0554 1.9300e- 003 0.0446 0.0466 0.0000 276.5987 276.5987 0.0829 8.6000e- 004 278.9282 Maximum 0.1396 1.0887 1.0714 3.1400e- 003 7.1200e- 003 0.0482 0.0554 1.9300e- 003 0.0446 0.0466 0.0000 276.5987 276.5987 0.0829 1.0600e- 003 278.9282 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 6 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio-CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N20 CO2e Percent Reduction 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 18.05 0.00 3.82 9.17 0.00 0.53 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Quarter Start Date End Date Maximum Unmitigated ROG + NOX (tons/quarter) Maximum Mitigated ROG + NOX (tons/quarter) 1 9-25-2023 12-24-2023 0.2464 0.2464 2 12-25-2023 3-24-2024 0.6353 0.6353 3 3-25-2024 6-24-2024 0.4711 0.4711 4 6-25-2024 9-24-2024 0.1482 0.1482 Highest 0.6353 0.6353 2.2 Overall Operational Unmitigated Operational ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Area 0.0630 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 Energy 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 6.2569 6.2569 3.8000e- 004 5.0000e- 005 6.2802 Mobile 1.1600e- 003 1.4200e- 003 0.0116 2.0000e- 005 2.5900e- 003 2.0000e- 005 2.6100e- 003 6.9000e- 004 2.0000e- 005 7.1000e- 004 0.0000 2.3272 2.3272 1.6000e- 004 1.0000e- 004 2.3614 Stationary 0.0111 0.0310 0.0282 5.0000e- 005 1.6300e- 003 1.6300e- 003 1.6300e- 003 1.6300e- 003 0.0000 5.1408 5.1408 7.2000e- 004 0.0000 5.1588 Waste 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Water 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0752 0.0324 0.0398 7.0000e- 005 2.5900e- 003 1.6500e- 003 4.2400e- 003 6.9000e- 004 1.6500e- 003 2.3400e- 003 0.0000 13.7248 13.7248 1.2600e- 003 1.5000e- 004 13.8005 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 7 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 2.2 Overall Operational Mitigated Operational ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Area 0.0630 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 Energy 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 6.2569 6.2569 3.8000e- 004 5.0000e- 005 6.2802 Mobile 1.1600e- 003 1.4200e- 003 0.0116 2.0000e- 005 2.5900e- 003 2.0000e- 005 2.6100e- 003 6.9000e- 004 2.0000e- 005 7.1000e- 004 0.0000 2.3272 2.3272 1.6000e- 004 1.0000e- 004 2.3614 Stationary 0.0111 0.0310 0.0282 5.0000e- 005 1.6300e- 003 1.6300e- 003 1.6300e- 003 1.6300e- 003 0.0000 5.1408 5.1408 7.2000e- 004 0.0000 5.1588 Waste 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Water 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0752 0.0324 0.0398 7.0000e- 005 2.5900e- 003 1.6500e- 003 4.2400e- 003 6.9000e- 004 1.6500e- 003 2.3400e- 003 0.0000 13.7248 13.7248 1.2600e- 003 1.5000e- 004 13.8005 ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio-CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N20 CO2e Percent Reduction 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.0 Construction Detail Construction Phase Phase Number Phase Name Phase Type Start Date End Date Num Days Week Num Days Phase Description 1 Site Preparation Site Preparation 9/25/2023 10/6/2023 5 10 2 Excavation Grading 10/9/2023 11/24/2023 5 35 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 8 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3 Building Construction Building Construction 12/11/2023 5/24/2024 5 120 4 Paving Paving 9/16/2024 9/20/2024 5 5 5 Excavated Material Hauling Trenching 11/13/2023 11/24/2023 5 10 6 Light Grading Grading 11/27/2023 12/8/2023 5 10 7 Demolition Demolition 9/2/2024 9/13/2024 5 10 8 Facilities Installation Building Construction 5/27/2024 8/30/2024 5 70 Acres of Grading (Site Preparation Phase): 0.5 Acres of Grading (Grading Phase): 1.5 Acres of Paving: 0 Residential Indoor: 0; Residential Outdoor: 0; Non-Residential Indoor: 0; Non-Residential Outdoor: 0; Striped Parking Area: 0 (Architectural Coating – sqft) OffRoad Equipment Phase Name Offroad Equipment Type Amount Usage Hours Horse Power Load Factor Facilities Installation Cranes 1 4.00 231 0.29 Paving Cement and Mortar Mixers 0 6.00 9 0.56 Demolition Concrete/Industrial Saws 1 8.00 81 0.73 Building Construction Cranes 1 4.00 231 0.29 Building Construction Forklifts 1 6.00 89 0.20 Excavation Graders 0 6.00 187 0.41 Site Preparation Graders 0 8.00 187 0.41 Paving Pavers 1 7.00 130 0.42 Paving Rollers 1 7.00 80 0.38 Demolition Rubber Tired Dozers 0 1.00 247 0.40 Excavation Rubber Tired Dozers 0 6.00 247 0.40 Building Construction Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 1 8.00 97 0.37 Demolition Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 1 6.00 97 0.37 Excavation Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 1 7.00 97 0.37 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 9 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Paving Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 0 7.00 97 0.37 Site Preparation Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 0 8.00 97 0.37 Facilities Installation Forklifts 1 6.00 89 0.20 Light Grading Graders 0 6.00 187 0.41 Light Grading Rubber Tired Dozers 0 6.00 247 0.40 Facilities Installation Welders 1 8.00 97 0.37 Light Grading Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 0 7.00 97 0.37 Demolition Off-Highway Trucks 1 8.00 402 0.38 Site Preparation Skid Steer Loaders 1 8.00 65 0.37 Excavation Excavators 1 8.00 158 0.38 Excavation Off-Highway Trucks 1 8.00 402 0.38 Building Construction Trenchers 1 8.00 78 0.50 Building Construction Off-Highway Trucks 3 8.00 402 0.38 Light Grading Skid Steer Loaders 1 8.00 65 0.37 Trips and VMT Phase Name Offroad Equipment Count Worker Trip Number Vendor Trip Number Hauling Trip Number Worker Trip Length Vendor Trip Length Hauling Trip Length Worker Vehicle Class Vendor Vehicle Class Hauling Vehicle Class Demolition 3 8.00 0.00 1.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Site Preparation 1 3.00 0.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Excavation 3 8.00 0.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Building Construction 7 7.00 3.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Paving 2 5.00 0.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Excavated Material Hauling 0 0.00 200.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 HHDT Light Grading 1 3.00 0.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT Facilities Installation 3 7.00 3.00 0.00 10.80 7.30 20.00 LD_Mix HDT_Mix HHDT 3.1 Mitigation Measures Construction CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 10 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Water Exposed Area Water Unpaved Roads Reduce Vehicle Speed on Unpaved Roads 3.2 Site Preparation - 2023 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Fugitive Dust 2.7000e- 004 0.0000 2.7000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 3.2000e-4.3100e-6.9000e-1.0000e-1.5000e-1.5000e-1.3000e-1.3000e-0.0000 0.9057 0.9057 2.9000e-0.0000 0.9130 004 003 003 005 004 004 004 004 004 Total 3.2000e-4.3100e-6.9000e-1.0000e-2.7000e-1.5000e-4.2000e-3.0000e-1.3000e-1.6000e-0.0000 0.9057 0.9057 2.9000e-0.0000 0.9130 004 003 003 005 004 004 004 005 004 004 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 11 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.2 Site Preparation - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 4.0000e- 005 3.0000e- 005 3.4000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0964 0.0964 0.0000 0.0000 0.0972 Total 4.0000e- 005 3.0000e- 005 3.4000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0964 0.0964 0.0000 0.0000 0.0972 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Fugitive Dust 1.2000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 3.2000e-4.3100e-6.9000e-1.0000e-1.5000e-1.5000e-1.3000e-1.3000e-0.0000 0.9057 0.9057 2.9000e-0.0000 0.9130 004 003 003 005 004 004 004 004 004 Total 3.2000e-4.3100e-6.9000e-1.0000e-1.2000e-1.5000e-2.7000e-1.0000e-1.3000e-1.4000e-0.0000 0.9057 0.9057 2.9000e-0.0000 0.9130 004 003 003 005 004 004 004 005 004 004 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 12 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.2 Site Preparation - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 4.0000e- 005 3.0000e- 005 3.4000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0964 0.0964 0.0000 0.0000 0.0972 Total 4.0000e- 005 3.0000e- 005 3.4000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0964 0.0964 0.0000 0.0000 0.0972 3.3 Excavation - 2023 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Fugitive Dust 9.0000e- 004 0.0000 9.0000e- 004 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.0145 0.1135 0.1493 3.7000e- 004 4.7600e- 003 4.7600e- 003 4.3800e- 003 4.3800e- 003 0.0000 32.5893 32.5893 0.0105 0.0000 32.8528 Total 0.0145 0.1135 0.1493 3.7000e- 004 9.0000e- 004 4.7600e- 003 5.6600e- 003 1.0000e- 004 4.3800e- 003 4.4800e- 003 0.0000 32.5893 32.5893 0.0105 0.0000 32.8528 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 13 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.3 Excavation - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 3.8000e-2.6000e-3.2000e-1.0000e-1.1200e-1.0000e-1.1300e-3.0000e-1.0000e-3.0000e-0.0000 0.8995 0.8995 3.0000e-2.0000e-0.9076 004 004 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 005 005 Total 3.8000e-2.6000e-3.2000e-1.0000e-1.1200e-1.0000e-1.1300e-3.0000e-1.0000e-3.0000e-0.0000 0.8995 0.8995 3.0000e-2.0000e-0.9076 004 004 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 005 005 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Fugitive Dust 4.1000e- 004 0.0000 4.1000e- 004 5.0000e- 005 0.0000 5.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 0.0145 0.1135 0.1493 3.7000e- 004 4.7600e- 003 4.7600e- 003 4.3800e- 003 4.3800e- 003 0.0000 32.5893 32.5893 0.0105 0.0000 32.8528 Total 0.0145 0.1135 0.1493 3.7000e- 004 4.1000e- 004 4.7600e- 003 5.1700e- 003 5.0000e- 005 4.3800e- 003 4.4300e- 003 0.0000 32.5893 32.5893 0.0105 0.0000 32.8528 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 14 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.3 Excavation - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 3.8000e-2.6000e-3.2000e-1.0000e-1.1200e-1.0000e-1.1300e-3.0000e-1.0000e-3.0000e-0.0000 0.8995 0.8995 3.0000e-2.0000e-0.9076 004 004 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 005 005 Total 3.8000e-2.6000e-3.2000e-1.0000e-1.1200e-1.0000e-1.1300e-3.0000e-1.0000e-3.0000e-0.0000 0.8995 0.8995 3.0000e-2.0000e-0.9076 004 004 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 005 005 3.4 Building Construction - 2023 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Off-Road 0.0170 0.1363 0.1240 3.8000e- 004 6.1100e- 003 6.1100e- 003 5.6200e- 003 5.6200e- 003 0.0000 33.2010 33.2010 0.0107 0.0000 33.4694 Total 0.0170 0.1363 0.1240 3.8000e- 004 6.1100e- 003 6.1100e- 003 5.6200e- 003 5.6200e- 003 0.0000 33.2010 33.2010 0.0107 0.0000 33.4694 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 15 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.4 Building Construction - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 3.0000e-1.0000e-3.5000e-0.0000 1.5000e-1.0000e-1.6000e-4.0000e-1.0000e-5.0000e-0.0000 0.4515 0.4515 1.0000e-7.0000e-0.4713 005 003 004 004 005 004 005 005 005 005 005 Worker 1.4000e-1.0000e-1.2000e-0.0000 4.2000e-0.0000 4.2000e-1.1000e-0.0000 1.1000e-0.0000 0.3373 0.3373 1.0000e-1.0000e-0.3403 004 004 003 004 004 004 004 005 005 Total 1.7000e-1.1000e-1.5500e-0.0000 5.7000e-1.0000e-5.8000e-1.5000e-1.0000e-1.6000e-0.0000 0.7888 0.7888 2.0000e-8.0000e-0.8116 004 003 003 004 005 004 004 005 004 005 005 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Off-Road 0.0170 0.1363 0.1240 3.8000e- 004 6.1100e- 003 6.1100e- 003 5.6200e- 003 5.6200e- 003 0.0000 33.2009 33.2009 0.0107 0.0000 33.4694 Total 0.0170 0.1363 0.1240 3.8000e- 004 6.1100e- 003 6.1100e- 003 5.6200e- 003 5.6200e- 003 0.0000 33.2009 33.2009 0.0107 0.0000 33.4694 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 16 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.4 Building Construction - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 3.0000e-1.0000e-3.5000e-0.0000 1.5000e-1.0000e-1.6000e-4.0000e-1.0000e-5.0000e-0.0000 0.4515 0.4515 1.0000e-7.0000e-0.4713 005 003 004 004 005 004 005 005 005 005 005 Worker 1.4000e-1.0000e-1.2000e-0.0000 4.2000e-0.0000 4.2000e-1.1000e-0.0000 1.1000e-0.0000 0.3373 0.3373 1.0000e-1.0000e-0.3403 004 004 003 004 004 004 004 005 005 Total 1.7000e-1.1000e-1.5500e-0.0000 5.7000e-1.0000e-5.8000e-1.5000e-1.0000e-1.6000e-0.0000 0.7888 0.7888 2.0000e-8.0000e-0.8116 004 003 003 004 005 004 004 005 004 005 005 3.4 Building Construction - 2024 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Off-Road 0.1166 0.8963 0.8601 2.6500e- 003 0.0398 0.0398 0.0366 0.0366 0.0000 232.4801 232.4801 0.0752 0.0000 234.3598 Total 0.1166 0.8963 0.8601 2.6500e- 003 0.0398 0.0398 0.0366 0.0366 0.0000 232.4801 232.4801 0.0752 0.0000 234.3598 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 17 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.4 Building Construction - 2024 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 1.8000e-6.9400e-2.4100e-3.0000e-1.0500e-4.0000e-1.0900e-3.0000e-4.0000e-3.4000e-0.0000 3.1052 3.1052 1.0000e-4.5000e-3.2417 004 003 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 004 004 Worker 9.3000e-6.2000e-7.8600e-2.0000e-2.9500e-2.0000e-2.9600e-7.8000e-1.0000e-8.0000e-0.0000 2.3020 2.3020 6.0000e-6.0000e-2.3217 004 004 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 005 005 Total 1.1100e-7.5600e-0.0103 5.0000e-4.0000e-6.0000e-4.0500e-1.0800e-5.0000e-1.1400e-0.0000 5.4072 5.4072 1.6000e-5.1000e-5.5634 003 003 005 003 005 003 003 005 003 004 004 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Off-Road 0.1166 0.8963 0.8601 2.6500e- 003 0.0398 0.0398 0.0366 0.0366 0.0000 232.4798 232.4798 0.0752 0.0000 234.3595 Total 0.1166 0.8963 0.8601 2.6500e- 003 0.0398 0.0398 0.0366 0.0366 0.0000 232.4798 232.4798 0.0752 0.0000 234.3595 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 18 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.4 Building Construction - 2024 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 1.8000e-6.9400e-2.4100e-3.0000e-1.0500e-4.0000e-1.0900e-3.0000e-4.0000e-3.4000e-0.0000 3.1052 3.1052 1.0000e-4.5000e-3.2417 004 003 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 004 004 Worker 9.3000e-6.2000e-7.8600e-2.0000e-2.9500e-2.0000e-2.9600e-7.8000e-1.0000e-8.0000e-0.0000 2.3020 2.3020 6.0000e-6.0000e-2.3217 004 004 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 005 005 Total 1.1100e-7.5600e-0.0103 5.0000e-4.0000e-6.0000e-4.0500e-1.0800e-5.0000e-1.1400e-0.0000 5.4072 5.4072 1.6000e-5.1000e-5.5634 003 003 005 003 005 003 003 005 003 004 004 3.5 Paving - 2024 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Off-Road 7.2000e-7.1400e-0.0104 2.0000e-3.5000e-3.5000e-3.3000e-3.3000e-0.0000 1.4076 1.4076 4.6000e-0.0000 1.4190 004 003 005 004 004 004 004 004 Paving 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 7.2000e-7.1400e-0.0104 2.0000e-3.5000e-3.5000e-3.3000e-3.3000e-0.0000 1.4076 1.4076 4.6000e-0.0000 1.4190 004 003 005 004 004 004 004 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 19 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.5 Paving - 2024 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 3.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 2.7000e- 004 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0783 0.0783 0.0000 0.0000 0.0790 Total 3.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 2.7000e- 004 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0783 0.0783 0.0000 0.0000 0.0790 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Off-Road 7.2000e-7.1400e-0.0104 2.0000e-3.5000e-3.5000e-3.3000e-3.3000e-0.0000 1.4076 1.4076 4.6000e-0.0000 1.4190 004 003 005 004 004 004 004 004 Paving 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 7.2000e-7.1400e-0.0104 2.0000e-3.5000e-3.5000e-3.3000e-3.3000e-0.0000 1.4076 1.4076 4.6000e-0.0000 1.4190 004 003 005 004 004 004 004 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 20 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.5 Paving - 2024 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 3.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 2.7000e- 004 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0783 0.0783 0.0000 0.0000 0.0790 Total 3.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 2.7000e- 004 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 0.0000 1.0000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0783 0.0783 0.0000 0.0000 0.0790 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 21 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.6 Excavated Material Hauling - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 2.2000e-0.0136 3.6100e-6.0000e-1.7100e-1.1000e-1.8200e-4.7000e-1.1000e-5.8000e-0.0000 6.0015 6.0015 3.0000e-9.5000e-6.2934 004 003 005 003 004 003 004 004 004 004 004 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 2.2000e-0.0136 3.6100e-6.0000e-1.7100e-1.1000e-1.8200e-4.7000e-1.1000e-5.8000e-0.0000 6.0015 6.0015 3.0000e-9.5000e-6.2934 004 003 005 003 004 003 004 004 004 004 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 22 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.6 Excavated Material Hauling - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 2.2000e-0.0136 3.6100e-6.0000e-1.7100e-1.1000e-1.8200e-4.7000e-1.1000e-5.8000e-0.0000 6.0015 6.0015 3.0000e-9.5000e-6.2934 004 003 005 003 004 003 004 004 004 004 004 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 2.2000e-0.0136 3.6100e-6.0000e-1.7100e-1.1000e-1.8200e-4.7000e-1.1000e-5.8000e-0.0000 6.0015 6.0015 3.0000e-9.5000e-6.2934 004 003 005 003 004 003 004 004 004 004 004 3.7 Light Grading - 2023 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Fugitive Dust 3.9800e- 003 0.0000 3.9800e- 003 4.3000e- 004 0.0000 4.3000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 3.2000e-4.3100e-6.9000e-1.0000e-1.5000e-1.5000e-1.3000e-1.3000e-0.0000 0.9057 0.9057 2.9000e-0.0000 0.9130 004 003 003 005 004 004 004 004 004 Total 3.2000e-4.3100e-6.9000e-1.0000e-3.9800e-1.5000e-4.1300e-4.3000e-1.3000e-5.6000e-0.0000 0.9057 0.9057 2.9000e-0.0000 0.9130 004 003 003 005 003 004 003 004 004 004 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 23 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.7 Light Grading - 2023 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 4.0000e- 005 3.0000e- 005 3.4000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0964 0.0964 0.0000 0.0000 0.0972 Total 4.0000e- 005 3.0000e- 005 3.4000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0964 0.0964 0.0000 0.0000 0.0972 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Fugitive Dust 1.7900e- 003 0.0000 1.7900e- 003 1.9000e- 004 0.0000 1.9000e- 004 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 3.2000e-4.3100e-6.9000e-1.0000e-1.5000e-1.5000e-1.3000e-1.3000e-0.0000 0.9057 0.9057 2.9000e-0.0000 0.9130 004 003 003 005 004 004 004 004 004 Total 3.2000e-4.3100e-6.9000e-1.0000e-1.7900e-1.5000e-1.9400e-1.9000e-1.3000e-3.2000e-0.0000 0.9057 0.9057 2.9000e-0.0000 0.9130 004 003 003 005 003 004 003 004 004 004 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 24 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.7 Light Grading - 2023 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 4.0000e- 005 3.0000e- 005 3.4000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0964 0.0964 0.0000 0.0000 0.0972 Total 4.0000e- 005 3.0000e- 005 3.4000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 0.0000 1.2000e- 004 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 3.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0964 0.0964 0.0000 0.0000 0.0972 3.8 Demolition - 2024 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Fugitive Dust 9.0000e- 005 0.0000 9.0000e- 005 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 4.5900e- 003 0.0341 0.0429 1.1000e- 004 1.4000e- 003 1.4000e- 003 1.3300e- 003 1.3300e- 003 0.0000 9.5225 9.5225 2.3400e- 003 0.0000 9.5809 Total 4.5900e-0.0341 0.0429 1.1000e-9.0000e-1.4000e-1.4900e-1.0000e-1.3300e-1.3400e-0.0000 9.5225 9.5225 2.3400e-0.0000 9.5809 003 004 005 003 003 005 003 003 003 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 25 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.8 Demolition - 2024 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 7.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0295 0.0295 0.0000 0.0000 0.0309 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 1.0000e-7.0000e-8.6000e-0.0000 3.2000e-0.0000 3.2000e-9.0000e-0.0000 9.0000e-0.0000 0.2506 0.2506 1.0000e-1.0000e-0.2527 004 005 004 004 004 005 005 005 005 Total 1.0000e-1.4000e-8.8000e-0.0000 3.3000e-0.0000 3.3000e-9.0000e-0.0000 9.0000e-0.0000 0.2800 0.2800 1.0000e-1.0000e-0.2836 004 004 004 004 004 005 005 005 005 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Fugitive Dust 4.0000e- 005 0.0000 4.0000e- 005 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Off-Road 4.5900e- 003 0.0341 0.0429 1.1000e- 004 1.4000e- 003 1.4000e- 003 1.3300e- 003 1.3300e- 003 0.0000 9.5224 9.5224 2.3400e- 003 0.0000 9.5809 Total 4.5900e-0.0341 0.0429 1.1000e-4.0000e-1.4000e-1.4400e-1.0000e-1.3300e-1.3400e-0.0000 9.5224 9.5224 2.3400e-0.0000 9.5809 003 004 005 003 003 005 003 003 003 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 26 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.8 Demolition - 2024 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 7.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0295 0.0295 0.0000 0.0000 0.0309 Vendor 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Worker 1.0000e-7.0000e-8.6000e-0.0000 3.2000e-0.0000 3.2000e-9.0000e-0.0000 9.0000e-0.0000 0.2506 0.2506 1.0000e-1.0000e-0.2527 004 005 004 004 004 005 005 005 005 Total 1.0000e-1.4000e-8.8000e-0.0000 3.3000e-0.0000 3.3000e-9.0000e-0.0000 9.0000e-0.0000 0.2800 0.2800 1.0000e-1.0000e-0.2836 004 004 004 004 004 005 005 005 005 3.9 Facilities Installation - 2024 Unmitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Off-Road 0.0157 0.1384 0.1398 2.7000e- 004 6.5500e- 003 6.5500e- 003 6.2400e- 003 6.2400e- 003 0.0000 23.8185 23.8185 4.6100e- 003 0.0000 23.9338 Total 0.0157 0.1384 0.1398 2.7000e- 004 6.5500e- 003 6.5500e- 003 6.2400e- 003 6.2400e- 003 0.0000 23.8185 23.8185 4.6100e- 003 0.0000 23.9338 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 27 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.9 Facilities Installation - 2024 Unmitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 1.2000e-4.6300e-1.6100e-2.0000e-7.0000e-3.0000e-7.2000e-2.0000e-3.0000e-2.3000e-0.0000 2.0701 2.0701 7.0000e-3.0000e-2.1611 004 003 003 005 004 005 004 004 005 004 005 004 Worker 6.2000e-4.1000e-5.2400e-2.0000e-1.9600e-1.0000e-1.9800e-5.2000e-1.0000e-5.3000e-0.0000 1.5347 1.5347 4.0000e-4.0000e-1.5478 004 004 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 005 005 Total 7.4000e-5.0400e-6.8500e-4.0000e-2.6600e-4.0000e-2.7000e-7.2000e-4.0000e-7.6000e-0.0000 3.6048 3.6048 1.1000e-3.4000e-3.7090 004 003 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 004 004 Mitigated Construction On-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Off-Road 0.0157 0.1384 0.1398 2.7000e- 004 6.5500e- 003 6.5500e- 003 6.2400e- 003 6.2400e- 003 0.0000 23.8185 23.8185 4.6100e- 003 0.0000 23.9338 Total 0.0157 0.1384 0.1398 2.7000e- 004 6.5500e- 003 6.5500e- 003 6.2400e- 003 6.2400e- 003 0.0000 23.8185 23.8185 4.6100e- 003 0.0000 23.9338 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 28 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 3.9 Facilities Installation - 2024 Mitigated Construction Off-Site ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Hauling 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Vendor 1.2000e-4.6300e-1.6100e-2.0000e-7.0000e-3.0000e-7.2000e-2.0000e-3.0000e-2.3000e-0.0000 2.0701 2.0701 7.0000e-3.0000e-2.1611 004 003 003 005 004 005 004 004 005 004 005 004 Worker 6.2000e-4.1000e-5.2400e-2.0000e-1.9600e-1.0000e-1.9800e-5.2000e-1.0000e-5.3000e-0.0000 1.5347 1.5347 4.0000e-4.0000e-1.5478 004 004 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 005 005 Total 7.4000e-5.0400e-6.8500e-4.0000e-2.6600e-4.0000e-2.7000e-7.2000e-4.0000e-7.6000e-0.0000 3.6048 3.6048 1.1000e-3.4000e-3.7090 004 003 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 004 004 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 29 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 4.0 Operational Detail - Mobile 4.1 Mitigation Measures Mobile ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Mitigated 1.1600e-1.4200e-0.0116 2.0000e-2.5900e-2.0000e-2.6100e-6.9000e-2.0000e-7.1000e-0.0000 2.3272 2.3272 1.6000e-1.0000e-2.3614 003 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 004 004 Unmitigated 1.1600e-1.4200e-0.0116 2.0000e-2.5900e-2.0000e-2.6100e-6.9000e-2.0000e-7.1000e-0.0000 2.3272 2.3272 1.6000e-1.0000e-2.3614 003 003 005 003 005 003 004 005 004 004 004 4.2 Trip Summary Information Average Daily Trip Rate Unmitigated Mitigated Land Use Weekday Saturday Sunday Annual VMT Annual VMT User Defined Industrial 2.00 2.00 2.00 6,916 6,916 Total 2.00 2.00 2.00 6,916 6,916 4.3 Trip Type Information Miles Trip % Trip Purpose % Land Use H-W or C-W H-S or C-C H-O or C-NW H-W or C-W H-S or C-C H-O or C-NW Primary Diverted Pass-by User Defined Industrial 9.50 7.30 7.30 100.00 0.00 0.00 100 0 0 4.4 Fleet Mix Land Use LDA LDT1 LDT2 MDV LHD1 LHD2 MHD HHD OBUS UBUS MCY SBUS MH User Defined Industrial 0.553514 0.062792 0.181046 0.120736 0.024419 0.006214 0.008493 0.006184 0.000715 0.000556 0.029185 0.000982 0.005164 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 30 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 5.0 Energy Detail Historical Energy Use: N 5.1 Mitigation Measures Energy ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Electricity Mitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 6.2569 6.2569 3.8000e- 004 5.0000e- 005 6.2802 Electricity Unmitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 6.2569 6.2569 3.8000e- 004 5.0000e- 005 6.2802 NaturalGas Mitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 NaturalGas Unmitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 31 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 5.2 Energy by Land Use - NaturalGas Unmitigated NaturalGa s Use ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use kBTU/yr tons/yr MT/yr User Defined Industrial 0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Mitigated NaturalGa s Use ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use kBTU/yr tons/yr MT/yr User Defined Industrial 0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 32 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 5.3 Energy by Land Use - Electricity Unmitigated Electricity Use Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use kWh/yr MT/yr User Defined Industrial 25545.4 6.2569 3.8000e- 004 5.0000e- 005 6.2802 Total 6.2569 3.8000e- 004 5.0000e- 005 6.2802 Mitigated Electricity Use Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use kWh/yr MT/yr User Defined Industrial 25545.4 6.2569 3.8000e- 004 5.0000e- 005 6.2802 Total 6.2569 3.8000e- 004 5.0000e- 005 6.2802 6.0 Area Detail 6.1 Mitigation Measures Area CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 33 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category tons/yr MT/yr Mitigated 0.0630 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 Unmitigated 0.0630 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 6.2 Area by SubCategory Unmitigated ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e SubCategory tons/yr MT/yr Architectural Coating 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Consumer Products 0.0629 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Landscaping 0.0000 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 Total 0.0629 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 34 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 6.2 Area by SubCategory Mitigated ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e SubCategory tons/yr MT/yr Architectural Coating 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Consumer Products 0.0629 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Landscaping 0.0000 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 Total 0.0629 0.0000 1.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 2.0000e- 005 0.0000 0.0000 2.0000e- 005 7.0 Water Detail 7.1 Mitigation Measures Water CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 35 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Category MT/yr Mitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Unmitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 7.2 Water by Land Use Unmitigated Indoor/Out door Use Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use Mgal MT/yr User Defined Industrial 0 / 0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 36 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 7.2 Water by Land Use Mitigated Indoor/Out door Use Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use Mgal MT/yr User Defined Industrial 0 / 0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 8.0 Waste Detail 8.1 Mitigation Measures Waste Category/Year Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e MT/yr Mitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Unmitigated 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 37 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 8.2 Waste by Land Use Unmitigated Waste Disposed Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use tons MT/yr User Defined Industrial 0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Mitigated Waste Disposed Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Land Use tons MT/yr User Defined Industrial 0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Total 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 9.0 Operational Offroad Equipment Type Number Hours/Day Days/Year Horse Power Load Factor Fuel Type CalEEMod Version: CalEEMod.2020.4.0 Page 38 of 38 Date: 7/20/2021 1:16 PM Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement - San Diego County, Annual EMFAC Off-Model Adjustment Factors for Gasoline Light Duty Vehicle to Account for the SAFE Vehicle Rule Applied 10.0 Stationary Equipment Fire Pumps and Emergency Generators Equipment Type Number Hours/Day Hours/Year Horse Power Load Factor Fuel Type Emergency Generator 1 0.25 50 270 0.73 Diesel Boilers Equipment Type Number Heat Input/Day Heat Input/Year Boiler Rating Fuel Type User Defined Equipment Equipment Type Number 10.1 Stationary Sources Unmitigated/Mitigated ROG NOx CO SO2 Fugitive PM10 Exhaust PM10 PM10 Total Fugitive PM2.5 Exhaust PM2.5 PM2.5 Total Bio- CO2 NBio- CO2 Total CO2 CH4 N2O CO2e Equipment Type tons/yr MT/yr Emergency 0.0111 0.0310 0.0282 5.0000e-1.6300e-1.6300e-1.6300e-1.6300e-0.0000 5.1408 5.1408 7.2000e-0.0000 5.1588 Generator -005 003 003 003 003 004 Diesel (175 - 300 HP) Total 0.0111 0.0310 0.0282 5.0000e- 005 1.6300e- 003 1.6300e- 003 1.6300e- 003 1.6300e- 003 0.0000 5.1408 5.1408 7.2000e- 004 0.0000 5.1588 11.0 Vegetation Initial Study Appendix B Biological Assessment This page intentionally left blank HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc. 7578 El Cajon Boulevard La Mesa, CA 91942 619.462.1515 tel 619.462.0552 fax www.helixepi.com August 18, 2021 00623.00006.006 Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Otay Water District 2554 Sweetwater Springs Boulevard Spring Valley, CA 91978-2096 Subject: Biological Assessment for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project Dear Ms. Coburn-Boyd: HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc. (HELIX) conducted a biological resources assessment for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project (project), located in the community of Jamul, in the County of San Diego. This letter summarizes the site’s existing conditions, potential survey requirements, and assessment of regulatory requirements (constraints). PROJECT LOCATION The project is located in the unincorporated community of Jamul in eastern San Diego County, 0.9 mile north of State Route (SR) 94 and 0.6 mile southeast of SR 54 (Figure 1, Regional Location, and Figure 2, USGS Topography). The project site extends north from the western terminus of Par 4 Drive, approximately 1,500 feet west of Steele Canyon Road, and is partially within an abandoned area of the golf course associated with the Cottonwood Golf Club (Figure 3, Aerial Photograph). The San Diego National Wildlife Refuge (SDNWR) is located immediately south of the project site. Access to the site is provided via Par 4 Drive and Steele Canyon Road, either from SR 94 to the south or from Willow Glen Drive and SR 54 to the north. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service- (USFWS) designated critical habitat for San Diego ambrosia (Ambrosia pumila), coastal California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica), and proposed critical habitat for Hermes copper butterfly (Lycaena hermes) are shown on Figure 4, Vegetation Communities and Sensitive Resources. The critical habitat for San Diego ambrosia slightly overlaps the project footprint along the southern edge; however, the activities will be entirely conducted within the existing developed and disturbed areas north of the mapped population. Critical habitat for coastal California gnatcatcher and proposed critical habitat for Hermes copper butterfly overlap with the southern portion of the study area, but do not overlap with the project footprint. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 2 of 21 August 18, 2021 PROJECT DESCRIPTION Otay Water District (OWD) proposes the project to replace an existing sewer lift station with a new and expanded sewer lift station on the adjacent property, and expand an existing access road that provides access to the existing lift station. The existing lift station is located within a 40-foot by 40-foot OWD easement. The existing access road runs south from the existing lift station through a 20-foot wide by 312-foot long OWD easement to the western terminus of Par 4 Drive. The total area of the existing easements is 0.18 acre. As part of the Project, OWD would acquire 0.19 acre of property to the west of the existing easements, resulting in a total project site area of 0.37 acre (Figure 3). The proposed lift station would have a capacity of between 500 and 600 gallons per minute (gpm) and would replace the existing 400-gpm lift station. The expanded capacity would be to serve anticipated development in the area. In addition to expanding lift station capacity, the project would increase the overall property area to allow for storage and greater functionality (e.g., turnaround capability for maintenance trucks). The project site would include the lift station structure, a diesel-powered emergency backup generator, an emergency storage tank, an existing transformer (to remain), and the expanded access road. The lift station structure would house a below-grade wet well and dry well, two 40-horsepower (HP) pumps, a fan for ventilation, and a control room. The generator, emergency storage tank, and existing transformer would be located on a concrete pad that would surround the lift station structure. The emergency storage tank would have a capacity of approximately 40,000 gallons, or enough to provide at least two hours of storage. During normal operations, the lift station would be powered by the existing on-site transformer that currently powers the existing lift station. The emergency backup generator would power the lift station in the instance of failure of the transformer. The lift station would tie in to and receive wastewater flows from an existing 10-inch gravity sewer, located at a depth of 12 feet below ground surface (bgs) at the site, that conveys wastewater west from residential development located to the east of the site. After being pumped at the lift station, the wastewater would be discharged into an existing six-inch sewer force main, located approximately four feet bgs at the site, then be conveyed east and then north along Steele Canyon Road to an existing gravity sewer in Willow Glen Drive. The flows would then be conveyed via existing pipelines to OWD’s Ralph W. Chapman Water Recycling Facility (RWCWRF), located approximately 0.8 mile southwest of the intersection of SR 94 and SR 54, where it would be treated. The existing lift station would remain in operation until the new lift station is constructed and ready for operation, to allow for continuous wastewater conveyance. Once the new lift station becomes operational, the existing lift station would be demolished. Construction of the project would require site preparation to clear existing vegetation, excavation for the below-grade wet well and dry well, light grading for the site area surrounding the lift station and for the expanded access road, construction of the lift station structure and site area pad, installation and connection of facilities, paving, and demolition of existing structures. Construction is expected to require approximately one year to complete and would occur between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. in accordance with the County of San Diego Municipal Code. Excavation is currently estimated to result in 1,500 cubic yards (CY) of export, which would either be taken by the adjacent golf course or transported Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 3 of 21 August 18, 2021 to an existing legal disposal site. Construction staging would occur either within the project site or within adjacent disturbed areas of the abandoned golf course. The proposed facilities would be designed and constructed in conformance with pertinent engineering standards, including applicable elements of the Water Agencies’ Standards Design Guidelines for Water, Recycled Water and Sewer Facilities and Standard Specifications for Water, Recycled Water and Sewer Facilities, which OWD has adopted as their design and construction standards. The project would also conform to current versions of the International Code Council International Building Code (IBC) and the related California Building Standards Commission California Building Code (CBC). Once construction activities are complete, activities on-site would be limited to routine maintenance of facilities, consistent with the requirements of the current lift station. The diesel-powered backup generator would run a maximum of 50 hours annually for maintenance and testing purposes, and then when normal power supply is lost. METHODS Literature Review Prior to conducting biological field surveys, HELIX conducted a thorough review of relevant maps, databases, and literature pertaining to the biological resources known to occur within the study area. Recent and historical aerial imagery, USGS topographic maps, soils maps (Natural Resource Conservation Service [NRCS] 2021), and other maps of the study area and vicinity were acquired and reviewed to obtain updated information on the natural environmental setting. In addition, a query of special-status species and habitats databases was conducted, including the USFWS species records (USFWS 2021a), California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) California Natural Diversity Database (CNDDB; CDFW 2021), Calflora database (Calflora 2020), SanBIOS and California Native Plant Society (CNPS) Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants (CNPS 2021). Any recorded locations of species, habitat types, wetlands, and other resources were mapped and overlain onto aerial imagery using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). General Biological Survey A general biological resource survey was conducted on February 25, 2021, by HELIX biologist Mandy Mathews, which entailed verification of existing biological resources within a study area generally defined by the potential impact area for the lift station expansion and approximately 100 feet beyond. The survey was conducted on foot, with the aid of binoculars, and included general mapping of vegetation communities, assessing the suitability of habitat for sensitive species, preliminarily identifying jurisdictional water and wetlands, if present, and noting plant and wildlife species observed. Rare Plant Survey Two rare plant surveys were conducted on March 16, 2021 and May 20, 2021, by HELIX biologist Ryan Fitch, which entailed searching for and mapping any sensitive plant species within the project footprint. The surveys were conducted on foot, and included mapping of sensitive plant species, if present. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 4 of 21 August 18, 2021 Survey Limitations Noted animal species were identified by direct observation, vocalizations, or the observance of scat, tracks, or other signs. However, the lists of species identified are not necessarily comprehensive accounts of all species that utilize the study area, as species that are nocturnal, secretive, or seasonally restricted may not have been observed. Those species that are of special-status and have potential to occur in the study area; however, are still addressed in this report. Nomenclature Nomenclature for this report is taken from Holland (1986) and Oberbauer (2008) for vegetation communities; Baldwin et al. (2012) for plants; North American Butterfly Association (2021) for butterflies; Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles (2021) for reptiles and amphibians; American Ornithological Society (2021) for birds; and Bradley et al. (2014) for mammals. Plant species status is from the CNPS Rare Plant Inventory (2021a) and CDFW (2021b). Animal species status is from the CDFW (2021c). EXISTING CONDITIONS Topography and Soils Elevations in the study area range from approximately 340 to 350 feet above mean sea level (amsl). The survey area generally consists of a flat area between an abandoned portion of Cottonwood Golf Club and residential development. Two soil types have been mapped in the survey area: Vista coarse sandy loam, 9 to 15 percent slopes, and Visalia sandy loam, 2 to 5 percent slopes. Vegetation Communities The study area supports three vegetation communities: Diegan coastal sage scrub, disturbed habitat, and urban/developed land (Figure 4). The numeric codes in parentheses following each community/habitat type name are taken from the Holland (Holland 1986) and Oberbauer (2008) classification systems. Diegan Coastal Sage Scrub (32500) Coastal sage scrub is one of the two major shrub types that occur in southern California, occupying xeric sites characterized by shallow soils (the other is chaparral). Four distinct coastal sage scrub geographical associations (northern, central, Venturan, and Diegan) are recognized along the California coast. Diegan coastal sage scrub typically consists of low-growing, soft woody sub-shrubs, up to one meter in height, that bloom in the winter and early spring. The community commonly occurs on low moisture availability sites characterized by steep xeric slopes or clay-rich soils that have high water retention. Dominants of this community observed on-site consist primarily of California buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum), California sagebrush (Artemisia californica), and laurel sumac (Malosma laurina). Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 5 of 21 August 18, 2021 The Diegan coastal sage scrub within the study area is located entirely outside of the project footprint to the south within the SDNWR and is dominated by California buckwheat, California sagebrush, and black sage (Salvia mellifera). The Diegan coastal sage scrub within the study area totals 0.3 acre. Disturbed Habitat (11300) Disturbed habitat is characterized by areas that have been physically disturbed (by previous legal human activity) and are no longer recognizable as a native or naturalized vegetation association but continue to retain a soil substrate. Typically, vegetation, if present, is nearly exclusively composed of non-native plant species, such as ornamentals or ruderal exotic species, that take advantage of disturbance or shows signs of past or present animal uses that removes any capability of providing viable natural habitat for uses other than dispersal (Oberbauer 2008). The disturbed habitat is on the formerly maintained, but now abandoned, golf course and is dominated by short-pod mustard (Hirschfeldia incana), red brome (Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens), Russian thistle (Salsola tragus), and horehound (Marrubium vulgare). The disturbed habitat within the study area occurs to the west of the access road to the existing lift station and encompasses approximately 1.3 acres. Urban/Developed Land (12000) Developed land applies to areas that have been constructed upon or otherwise physically altered to an extent that native vegetation is no longer supported. Developed land is characterized by permanent or semi-permanent structures, pavement or hardscape, and landscaped areas that often require irrigation. Areas where no natural land is evident, due to a large amount of debris or other materials being placed upon it, may also be considered developed (Oberbauer 2008). The remainder of the study area is urban/developed land consisting of a paved access road and existing lift station and encompasses approximately 1.5 acres. Plants A total of 21 plant species were observed within the study area during the general biological survey and focused species surveys, of which 11 (52 percent) are non-native species (Attachment A, Plant Species Observed). The predominance of non-native species is indicative of the high degree of disturbance as a result of historical and current uses of the study area. Animals A total of 23 animal species were observed/detected within the study area during the general biological survey and focused species surveys: 20 bird species and three mammal species (Attachment B; Animal Species Observed or Detected). Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 6 of 21 August 18, 2021 Sensitive Resources Sensitive Vegetation Communities/Habitats Sensitive vegetation communities/habitat types are defined as land that supports unique vegetation communities or the habitats of rare or endangered species or subspecies of animals or plants as defined by Section 15380 of the State CEQA Guidelines. The CDFW evaluates the rarity of natural communities using the NatureServe’s Heritage Methodology (Faber-Langendoen et. al 2012), in which communities are given a G (global) and S (State) rank based on their degree of imperilment (as measured by rarity, trends, and threats). Communities are assigned an overall rank of 1 through 5, with 1 being considered very rare and threatened, and 5 being considered demonstrably secure. Communities with a Rarity Ranking of S1 (critically imperiled), S2 (imperiled), or S3 (vulnerable) are considered sensitive by the CDFW. One sensitive vegetation communities or habitats occur within the study area: Diegan coastal sage scrub. This vegetation community, however, occurs entirely outside of the project footprint. Special Status Plant Species Special status plant species have been afforded special-status and/or recognition by the USFWS and/or CDFW. They may also be included in the CNPS’ Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants. Their status is often based on one or more of three distributional attributes: geographic range, habitat specificity, and/or population size. Sensitive species are those considered unusual or limited in that they are: (1) only found in the region; (2) a local representative of a species or association of species not otherwise found in the region; or (3) severely depleted within their ranges or within the region. One sensitive plant species was observed within the study area, including immediately adjacent to the project footprint: San Diego ambrosia (Figure 4). San Diego ambrosia (Ambrosia pumila) Listing: FE/--; CNPS List 1B.1 Distribution: Coastal San Diego and western Riverside Counties; Baja California, Mexico. Known in CA from fewer than 20 occurrences. Habitat: Found in a variety of habitats, including sage scrub, grasslands, wetlands, disturbed habitat, and sloped areas. Reiser (2001) states that preferred habitats are in creek beds, seasonally dry drainages, and floodplains, and the Federal Registry announcement for this species states that it is found in grasslands and valley bottoms. It is likely a function of soil and moisture rather than a specific habitat that determines the species’ territory. Flowers from May through October. Status on site: This species was observed within the abandoned portion of Cottonwood Golf Club and within SDNWR along the south side of the study area. Ten individuals were observed immediately adjacent to the chain-link fence, and a minimum of two hundred individuals were observed further south within SDNWR. Sensitive Plant Species with Potential to Occur No additional sensitive plant species have a potential to occur based on geographic range, elevation range, and/or lack of suitable habitat in the study area. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 7 of 21 August 18, 2021 Special Status Animal Species Special status animal species include those that have been afforded special-status and/or recognition by the USFWS and/or CDFW. In general, the principal reason an individual taxon (species or subspecies) is given such recognition is the documented or perceived decline or limitations of its population size or geographical extent and/or distribution, resulting in most cases from habitat loss. One special-status animal species was observed within or adjacent to the study area during the 2021 biological surveys and is discussed further below: Cooper’s hawk (Accipiter cooperii). Cooper’s hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Status: --/WL Distribution: Occurs year-round throughout San Diego County’s coastal slope where stands of trees are present Habitat(s): Oak groves, mature riparian woodlands, and eucalyptus stands or other mature forests Status on site: One individual was detected within suitable nesting trees within the abandoned portion of Cottonwood Golf Club west of the project footprint. Sensitive Animal Species with Potential to Occur One additional sensitive animal species has a high potential to occur: coastal California gnatcatcher. Coastal California gnatcatcher, a federally threatened and CDFW Species of Special Concern, has been reported within coastal sage scrub immediately south of the project footprint. Although the proposed critical habitat for the Hermes copper butterfly occurs south of the project footprint, the project footprint and immediate surrounding areas lack suitable habitat for this species. No other species have a high potential to occur based on geographic range, elevation range, and/or lack of suitable habitat in the study area. Nesting Birds Trees and shrubs both within and adjacent to the study area could provide suitable nesting habitat for numerous bird species known to the region. Raptor Foraging Three raptor species were observed during the general biological survey: Cooper’s hawk, red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), and red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus). Additionally, several other species have the potential to forage in the project vicinity. The study area provides moderate-quality raptor habitat due to the disturbed nature of the former recreational area, residential, and transportation uses. Extensive raptor foraging habitat occurs off-site in the project vicinity within undeveloped areas to the north of the project. Wildlife Corridor/Core Wildlife Areas Wildlife corridors connect otherwise isolated pieces of habitat and allow movement or dispersal of plants and animals. Wildlife corridors can be local or regional in scale and may function in different ways, depending on species and time of year. Wildlife corridors represent areas where wildlife movement is concentrated due to natural or manufactured constraints. Local corridors provide access to Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 8 of 21 August 18, 2021 resources such as food, water, and shelter. Animals can use these corridors, such as hillsides and tributary drainages to main drainages, to travel among different habitats (i.e., riparian and upland habitats). Some animals require riparian habitat for breeding and upland habitat for burrowing. Regional corridors provide these functions and also link two or more large areas of open space. Regional corridors also provide avenues for wildlife dispersal, migration, and contact between otherwise distinct populations. The project is not located within any linkages recognized by the South Coast Missing Linkages report (South Coast Wildlands 2008) or MSCP. The study area does not by itself function as nor does it contribute to any local or regional wildlife corridors or linkages. It is also not contained within or connected to any local or regional core resource areas. The majority of the study area and project features occur within developed recreational areas and roadways/public right-of-way (ROW). A patch of Diegan coastal sage scrub habitat occurs along the southern edge of the study area and connects to a larger undisturbed area of Diegan coastal sage scrub; however, this patch of habitat is located entirely outside of the project footprint. As such, the habitat would not function as a wildlife corridor or core wildlife area, although it may function as a stopover site for migrating bird species. REGULATORY FRAMEWORK Biological resources in the project footprint are subject to regulatory review by federal, State, and local agencies. Under CEQA, impacts associated with a proposed project are assessed with regard to significance criteria determined by the CEQA Lead Agency (in this case, OWD) pursuant to CEQA Guidelines. Biological resources-related laws and regulations that apply to the project analysis include the Federal Endangered Species Act (FESA), Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), CWA, CEQA, California Endangered Species Act (CESA), and CFG Code. Federal Federal Endangered Species Act Administered by the USFWS, the federal ESA provides the legal framework for the listing and protection of species (and their habitats) that are identified as being endangered or threatened with extinction. Actions that jeopardize endangered or threatened species and the habitats upon which they rely are considered take under the ESA. Section 9(a) of the ESA defines take as “to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or attempt to engage in any such conduct.” “Harm” and “harass” are further defined in federal regulations and case law to include actions that adversely impair or disrupt a listed species’ behavioral patterns. Sections 7 and 4(d) of the Federal ESA regulate actions that could jeopardize endangered or threatened species. Section 7, administered by the USFWS, describes a process of Federal interagency consultation for use when Federal actions may adversely affect listed species. A Section 7 Consultation (formal or informal) is required when there is a nexus between a listed species’ use of a site and if the project is funded (wholly or in part) by federal funding. A biological assessment is required for any major construction activity, if it may affect any listed species. Take can be authorized via a letter of Biological Opinion, issued by the USFWS, for non-marine related listed species issues. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 9 of 21 August 18, 2021 Identified by the USFWS, critical habitat is defined as areas of land that are considered necessary for endangered or threatened species to recover. The ultimate goal is to restore healthy populations of listed species within their native habitat so that they can be removed from the list of threatened or endangered species. Once an area is designated as critical habitat pursuant to the federal ESA, all federal agencies must consult with the USFWS to ensure that any action they authorize, fund, or carry out is not likely to result in the destruction or adverse modification of the critical habitat. Migratory Bird Treaty Act All migratory bird species that are native to the United States or its territories are protected under the federal MBTA, as amended under the Migratory Bird Treaty Reform Act of 2004 (FR Doc. 05-5127). The MBTA is generally protective of migratory birds but does not actually stipulate the type of protection required. In common practice, the MBTA is used to place restrictions on the disturbance of active bird nests during the nesting season (generally February 1 to August 31). In addition, the USFWS commonly places restrictions on disturbances allowed near active raptor nests. State Regulations California Environmental Quality Act Primary environmental legislation in California is found in CEQA and its implementing guidelines (State CEQA Guidelines), which require that projects with potential adverse effects (i.e., impacts) on the environment undergo environmental review. Adverse environmental impacts are typically mitigated as a result of the environmental review process in accordance with existing laws and regulations. California Endangered Species Act The CESA established that it is state policy to conserve, protect, restore, and enhance state endangered species and their habitats. Under state law, plant and animal species may be formally designated as rare, threatened, or endangered by official listing by the California Fish and Game Commission. The CESA authorizes that private entities may “take” plant or wildlife species listed as endangered or threatened under the FESA and CESA, pursuant to a federal Incidental Take Permit if the CDFW certifies that the incidental take is consistent with CESA (CFG Code Section 2080.1[a]). For state-only listed species, Section 2081 of CFG Code authorizes the CDFW to issue an Incidental Take Permit for state listed threatened and endangered species if specific criteria are met. Native Plant Protection Act Sections 1900–1913 of the CFG Code (Native Plant Protection Act; NPPA) direct the CDFW to carry out the state legislature’s intent to “…preserve, protect, and enhance endangered or rare native plants of this state.” The NPPA gives the California Fish and Game Commission the power to designate native plants as “endangered” or “rare” and protect endangered and rare plants from take. California Fish and Game Code The CFG Code provides specific protection and listing for several types of biological resources. Section 1600 of CFG Code requires a Streambed Alteration Agreement (SAA) for any activity that would Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 10 of 21 August 18, 2021 alter the flow, change, or use any material from the bed, channel, or bank of any perennial, intermittent, or ephemeral river, stream, and/or lake. Typical activities that require an SAA include excavation or fill placed within a channel, vegetation clearing, structures for diversion of water, installation of culverts and bridge supports, cofferdams for construction dewatering, and bank reinforcement. Notification is required prior to any such activities. Pursuant to CFG Code Section 3503, it is unlawful to take, possess, or needlessly destroy the nest or eggs of any bird, except as otherwise provided by this code or any regulation made pursuant thereto. Raptors and owls and their active nests are protected by CFG Code Section 3503.5, which states that it is unlawful to take, possess, or destroy any birds of prey or to take, possess, or destroy the nest or eggs of any such bird unless authorized by the CDFW. Section 3513 states that it is unlawful to take or possess any migratory non-game bird as designated in the MBTA. These regulations could require that construction activities (particularly vegetation removal or construction near nests) be reduced or eliminated during critical phases of the nesting cycle unless surveys by a qualified biologist demonstrate that nests, eggs, or nesting birds will not be disturbed, subject to approval by CDFW and/or USFWS. SIGNIFICANCE OF PROJECT IMPACTS AND PROPOSED MITIGATION This section describes potential direct and indirect impacts associated with the proposed project. Direct impacts immediately alter the affected biological resources, such that those resources are eliminated temporarily or permanently. Lift station expansion would result in permanent impacts. Criteria for Determining Impact Significance The significance of impacts to biological resources present, or those with potential to occur, was determined based upon the sensitivity of the resource and the extent of the anticipated impacts. For certain highly sensitive resources (e.g., a federally listed species), any impact would be significant. Conversely, other resources that are of low sensitivity (e.g., species with a large, locally stable population in the County but declining elsewhere) could sustain some impact with a less than significant effect. According to Appendix F of the CEQA Guidelines, project impacts to biological resources would be considered significant if they would: (a) Have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or through habitat modifications, on any species identified as a candidate, sensitive, or special-status species in local or regional plans, policies, or regulations, or by CDFW or USFWS. (b) Have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian habitat or sensitive natural community identified by local or regional plans, policies, regulations or by CDFW or USFWS. (c) Have a substantial adverse effect on federally protected wetlands as defined by Section 404 of the CWA (including, but not limited to, marsh, vernal pool, coastal, etc.) through direct removal, filling hydrological interruption, or other means. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 11 of 21 August 18, 2021 (d) Interfere substantially with the movement of any native resident or migratory fish or wildlife species, or with an established native resident or migratory wildlife corridors, or impede the use of native wildlife nursery sites. (e) Conflict with local policies or ordinances protecting biological resources, such as a tree preservation policy or ordinance. (f) Conflict with provisions of an adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Community Conservation Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat conservation plan. Issue 1: Special-Status Species Would the project have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or through habitat modifications, on any species identified as a candidate, sensitive, or special-status species in local or regional plans, policies, or regulations, or by the CDFW or USFWS? Impact Analysis Special-Status Plant Species If avoidance measures are not in place, the project could result in significant direct impacts to one special-status plant species during construction, as detailed further below. Direct impacts to San Diego ambrosia are not authorized, nor are they expected, as the project impact areas are restricted to existing disturbed and/or developed lands. If not properly flagged for avoidance, approximately ten individual San Diego ambrosia located immediately adjacent to planned work areas have the potential to be impacted during construction. This species occurs within the fence line separating the project footprint from the adjacent open space, and are not expected to be affected due to their location outside of potential work areas. There are numerous documented occurrences of these species throughout the surrounding area, indicating that the study area does not represent a geographically significant population. As no direct impacts are anticipated, no mitigation is required. However, if project work limits are exceeded and additional inadvertent impacts occur, the project could result in potentially significant impacts. The project incorporates the following project design feature (PDF) to ensure that no impacts to special-status plant species would occur as a result of project activities: PDF-BIO-1 A qualified biologist will conduct a pre-construction environmental training session for construction personnel to inform them of the sensitive biological resources, including special-status species, in the local area and the avoidance measures in place to remain in compliance. The biologist will periodically monitor construction activities to help ensure that project activities occur within the approved project limits and in compliance with required environmental conditions. The biologist will identify and flag San Diego ambrosia occurring within the project work area for avoidance. Special-Status Animal Species If avoidance measures are not in place, the project could result in significant direct and/or indirect impacts to several special-status bird species during construction, as detailed further below. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 12 of 21 August 18, 2021 Direct impacts to the coastal California gnatcatcher are not authorized nor are they expected due to the fact that no direct impacts will occur to suitable habitat for this species; however, this species has the potential to nest off-site, within 500 feet of project construction. Indirect impacts are also not authorized. If avoidance measures are not in place, then project construction could result in potential significant noise-related indirect impacts on the coastal California gnatcatcher, if breeding individuals become displaced from their nests and fail to breed. The project incorporates the PDF below to ensure that potential indirect impacts on the coastal California gnatcatcher are avoided: PDF-BIO-2 The following project requirements regarding the coastal California gnatcatcher shall be shown on the construction plans: No clearing, grubbing, grading, or other construction activities shall occur between February 15 and August 30, the breeding season of the coastal California gnatcatcher, until the following requirements have been met to the satisfaction of OWD: (A) A qualified biologist (possessing a valid endangered species act section 10(a)(1)(A) Recovery Permit) shall survey those suitable habitat areas that would be subject to construction noise levels exceeding 60 decibels [dB(A)] hourly average for the presence of coastal California gnatcatcher. A single pre-construction survey for the coastal California gnatcatcher shall be conducted within three days prior to the commencement of any construction. If gnatcatchers are present, then the following conditions must be met: Between February 15 and August 30, no clearing, grubbing, or grading of occupied gnatcatcher habitat shall be permitted. Areas restricted from such activities shall be staked or fenced under the supervision of a qualified biologist; and Between February 15 and August 30, no construction activities shall occur within any portion of the site where construction activities would result in noise levels exceeding 60 dB(A) hourly average at the edge of occupied gnatcatcher habitat. An analysis showing that noise generated by construction activities would not exceed 60 dB(A) hourly average at the edge of occupied habitat must be completed by a qualified acoustician (possessing current noise engineer license of registration with monitoring noise level experience with listed animal species) and approved by OWD at least two weeks prior to the commencement of construction activities. Prior to the commencement of construction activities during the breeding season, areas restricted from such activities shall be staked or fenced under the supervision of a qualified biologist; or At least two weeks prior to the commencement of construction activities, under the direction of a qualified acoustician, noise attenuation measures (e.g., berms, walls) shall be implemented to ensure that noise levels resulting from construction activities will not exceed 60 dB(A) hourly average at the edge of habitat occupied by the coastal California gnatcatcher. Concurrent with the commencement of construction activities and the construction of necessary noise attenuation facilities, noise monitoring* shall be conducted at the edge of the occupied habitat area to ensure that noise levels do not exceed 60 dB(A) hourly average. If the noise attenuation techniques implemented are determined to inadequate by the qualified acoustician or biologist, then the associated construction activities shall cease until such time that adequate noise attenuation is achieved or until the end of the breeding season (August 16). Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 13 of 21 August 18, 2021 *Construction noise monitoring shall continue to be monitored at least twice weekly on varying days, or more frequently depending on the construction activity, to verify that noise levels at the edge of occupied habitat are maintained below 60 dB(A) hourly average or to the ambient noise level if it already exceeds 60 dB(A) hourly average. If not, other measures shall be implemented in consultation with the biologist and OWD, as necessary, to reduce noise levels to below 60 dB(A) hourly average, or to the ambient noise level if it already exceeds 60 dB(A) hourly average. Such measures may include, but are not limited to, limitations on the placement of construction equipment and the simultaneous use of equipment. (B) If coastal California gnatcatcher are not detected during the pre-construction survey, the qualified biologist shall submit substantial evidence to OWD and applicable resource agencies, which demonstrates whether or not mitigation measure such as noise walls are necessary between February 15 and August 30 as follows: (1) If this evidence indicated the potential is high for coastal California gnatcatcher to be present based on historical records or site conditions, then condition A(3)shall be adhered to as specified above. (2) If this evidence concludes that no impacts to this species are anticipated, no mitigation measures would be necessary. Cooper’s hawk, another State Watch List species was also detected immediately adjacent to the study area. If avoidance measures are not in place, then project construction could result in potential significant direct impact and noise-related indirect impacts to special-status bird species, including tree- nesting raptors. The project is required to comply with the regulations and guidelines of the MBTA and CFG Code. As such, the project must ensure no direct or indirect impacts to nesting birds and tree- nesting raptors, including Cooper’s hawk. The project incorporates the following PDF to ensure that no indirect impacts occur to nesting birds and tree-nesting raptors during project construction: PDF-BIO-3 Trimming, grubbing, and clearing of vegetation shall be avoided during the general avian breeding season (January 15 to July 15 for raptors; February 15 to August 31 for other avian species) to the extent feasible. If trimming, grubbing, or clearing of vegetation is proposed to occur during the general avian breeding season, a pre-construction survey shall be conducted by a qualified biologist no more than seven days prior to vegetation clearing to determine if active bird nests are present in the affected areas. If there are no nesting birds (includes nest building or other breeding/nesting behavior) within this area, trimming, grubbing, and clearing of vegetation shall be allowed to proceed. If active bird nests are confirmed to be present during the pre-construction survey, a buffer zone will be established by the biologist. Construction activities shall avoid any active nests until a qualified biologist has verified that the young have fledged, or the nest has otherwise become inactive. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 14 of 21 August 18, 2021 Mitigation Measures Implementation of the above PDFs would ensure project consistency with the protection of any species identified as a candidate, sensitive, or special-status species. No mitigation is required. Conclusion Project implementation could result in significant impacts to nesting birds and raptors, including special- status avian species (i.e., coastal California gnatcatcher and Cooper’s hawk), with the potential to nest within or adjacent to the project footprint. Implementation of the PDFs detailed above would ensure that potential impacts are avoided by the project. Issue 2: Riparian Habitat and Sensitive Natural Communities Would the project have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian habitat or other sensitive natural community identified in local or regional plans, policies, and regulations or by the CDFW or USFWS? Impact Analysis The proposed project would not result in impacts to riparian habitat or sensitive natural communities. The proposed project would impact 0.2 acre of disturbed habitat and 0.2 acre of developed land, neither of which are considered sensitive habitat or sensitive natural communities. Diegan coastal sage scrub, a sensitive natural community, is located approximately 20 feet south of the project footprint and is separated from the project footprint by a physical barrier (fencing). Mitigation Measures No mitigation is required. Conclusion The project would not result in impacts to sensitive natural communities. Issue 3: Jurisdictional Wetlands and Waterways Would the project have a substantial adverse effect on federally protected wetlands as defined by Section 404 of the federal CWA (including, but not limited to, marsh, vernal pool, coastal, etc.) through direct removal, filling, hydrological interruption, or other means? Impact Analysis The proposed project would not result in impacts to jurisdictional wetlands or waterways. Mitigation Measures No mitigation is required. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 15 of 21 August 18, 2021 Conclusion The project would not result in impacts to jurisdictional wetlands or waterways. Issue 4: Wildlife Movement and Nursery Sites Would the project interfere substantially with the movement of any native resident or migratory fish or wildlife species or with established native resident or migratory corridors, or impede the use of native wildlife nursery sites? Impact Analysis The project footprint does not by itself represent, nor does it contribute to any known wildlife corridors, linkages, or wildlife nursery sites. The project is sited within existing disturbed and developed land that is subject to maintenance. The expansion of the lift station would not act as major impediments to wildlife movement, including access to nursery sites, foraging habitat, breeding habitat, water sources, or other areas necessary for their life history. Higher quality habitat that functions as a wildlife movement corridor occurs south of the project footprint. The project avoids, and is set back from, the habitat, with the closest project elements separated from the habitat by existing barriers (i.e., fences). As the project developments have been sited within existing disturbed and developed areas, the potential impact on wildlife movement and nursery sites would be less than significant, and no additional mitigation is required. Mitigation Measures No mitigation is required. Conclusion Project implementation would not result in significant impacts on wildlife movement and nursery sites. Less than significant impacts would occur, and mitigation is not required. Issue 5: Local Policies and Ordinances Would the project conflict with any local policies or ordinances protecting biological resources, such as a tree preservation policy or ordinance? Impact Analysis No local policies or ordinances pertaining to biological resources are applicable to the project. The project would primarily occur within the existing disturbed areas and public road rights-of-way. No impact or conflict would occur. Mitigation Measures No mitigation is required. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 16 of 21 August 18, 2021 Conclusion The project would not conflict with local policies or ordinances protecting biology resources and mitigation is not required. Issue 6: Adopted Conservation Plans Would the project conflict with the provisions of an adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Community Conservation Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat conservation plan? Issue 6 Impact Analysis OWD is not a participating entity in any adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Conservation Community Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat conservation plan; therefore, no impacts would occur to any such plans. No conflict with an adopted plan would occur. Mitigation Measures No mitigation required. Conclusion The project would not conflict with any adopted plan and mitigation is not required. FEDERAL CONFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES ISSUES Issue 1: Federal Endangered Species Act, Section 7 Does the project involve any direct effects from construction activities, or indirect effects such as growth inducement that may affect federally listed threatened or endangered species or their critical habitat that are known, or have a potential, to occur on site, in the surrounding area, or in the service area? The project footprint is situated mainly on disturbed and developed land and located outside any recognized wildlife corridor or linkage. The southern portion of the project footprint overlaps with critical habitat for San Diego ambrosia. Approximately 10 San Diego ambrosia individuals are located adjacent to the project footprint along the chain-link fence that separates the project footprint from the abandoned portion of the Cottonwood Golf Club and SDNWR. Critical habitat for coastal California gnatcatcher and proposed critical habitat for Hermes copper butterfly are located south of the project footprint. The project as proposed occurs approximately 100 feet from suitable habitat for the federally-listed coastal California gnatcatcher. No impacts or take of coastal California gnatcatcher, or suitable habitat, are proposed, and none are authorized without additional consultation with the USFWS and CDFW. Further discussion is provided below regarding the potential effects of the proposed action on federally- listed species. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 17 of 21 August 18, 2021 Federally-Listed Plant Species. One federally-listed endangered (FE) plant species, San Diego ambrosia, occurs adjacent to the project footprint. As discussed above, the project would not affect San Diego ambrosia, suitable habitat, or critical habitat for this species. Although no effect is anticipated, the implementation of PDF-BIO-1 described above would further ensure that no effect on this species occurs. Federally-Listed Animal Species. One federally-listed threatened (FT) animal species is known to occur in the vicinity of the study area: coastal California gnatcatcher. As discussed above, the project would not affect the coastal California gnatcatcher, suitable habitat, or critical habitat for this species. Although no effect is anticipated, the implementation of PDF-BIO-2 and PDF-BIO-3 described above would further ensure that no effect on this species occurs. Mitigation Measures The implementation of PDF-BIO-1, PDF-BIO-2, and PDF-BIO-3 described above would ensure project consistency with the protection of any federally listed species or the respective critical habitats; therefore, the project would be in conformance with the ESA. No mitigation is required. Conclusion If unmitigated, project implementation may affect federally listed species; however, implementation of the project design features described above would ensure that the project has no effect, and no mitigation is required. Issue 2: Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation And Management Act, Essential Fish Habitat Does the project involve any direct effects from construction activities, or indirect effects such as growth inducement that may adversely affect essential fish habitat? The project lacks marine resources and Essential Fish Habitat regulated under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. No Essential Fish Habitat occurs in the immediate vicinity of the study area. Therefore, the project would not affect Essential Fish Habitat and would be in conformance with the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. Mitigation Measures No mitigation is required. Conclusion The project would have no direct or indirect effect on essential fish habitat, and no mitigation is required. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 18 of 21 August 18, 2021 Issue 3: Coastal Zone Management Act Is any portion of the project site located within the coastal zone? The study area is not located within the Coastal Zone. No coastal habitat occurs in the immediate vicinity of the study area. Therefore, the project would not affect any areas designated as Coastal Zone and would be in conformance with the Coastal Zone Management Act. Mitigation Measures No mitigation is required. Conclusion The project would have no direct or indirect effect on areas designated as Coastal Zone, and no mitigation is required. Issue 4: Migratory Bird Treaty Act Will the project affect protected migratory birds that are known, or have a potential, to occur on site, in the surrounding area, or in the service area? Construction of the proposed project may result in the removal or trimming of trees and other vegetation during the general bird nesting season (January 15 through September 15) and, therefore, would have the potential to adversely affect nesting birds protected under the MBTA. Implementation of project design features described above would ensure the appropriate pre-construction surveys and avoidance measures are completed to prevent adverse effects on nesting birds. Mitigation Measures The implementation of PDF-BIO-3 described above would ensure project consistency with the protection of migratory birds; therefore, the project would be in conformance with the MBTA. No mitigation is required. Conclusion With the implementation of PDF-BIO-3 described above, the project would result in no effect on migratory birds and would be in conformance with the MBTA, and no mitigation is required. Issue 5: Protection of Wetlands Does any portion of the project boundaries contain areas that should be evaluated for wetland delineation or require a permit from the United States Army Corps of Engineers? No wetland habitat is located within or adjacent to the study area. Therefore, the project would not affect wetlands and would not require a permit from the USACE. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 19 of 21 August 18, 2021 Mitigation Measures No mitigation is required. Conclusion The project would have no direct or indirect effect on areas subject to a permit from the USACE, and no mitigation is required. Issue 6: Wild and Scenic River Act Is any portion of the project located within a wild and scenic river? None of the proposed project components are planned on or in the immediate vicinity of areas designated as Wild and Scenic River. Therefore, the proposed project would not affect any areas designated as Wild and Scenic River and would be in conformance with the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. Mitigation Measures No mitigation is required. Conclusion The project would have no direct or indirect effect on areas subject to the Wild and Scenic River Act, and no mitigation is required. CONCLUSION OWD’s planned project activities would result in no impacts or less than significant impacts on special status plant species, sensitive natural communities/sensitive habitat types, federally protected wetlands and other waters, wildlife corridors and nursery sites, local policies and ordinances, and regional conservation plans. The project activities would further have no effect on federally listed plants, federally designated critical habitat, essential fish habitat, coastal resources, federally protected wetlands, and wild and scenic areas. If avoidance measures are not in place, the maintenance activities could result in potential significant impacts and adverse effects on special-status plant species and special-status bird species, including federally listed species and species protected under the MBTA. These potential impacts would be avoided and minimized through the implementation of project design features that are fundamental components and requirements of the project. OWD agrees to commit to the implementation of these design features prior to and during planned maintenance activities to avoid and minimize impacts. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 20 of 21 August 18, 2021 I certify that the information in this report and enclosures are correct and accurately represent my work. Please do not hesitate to contact me or Beth Martinez at (619) 462-1515 if you have any questions or require further assistance. Sincerely, Mandy Mathews Biologist Attachments Figure 1: Regional Location Figure 2: USGS Topography Figure 3: Aerial Photograph Figure 4: Vegetation Communities and Sensitive Resources Attachment A: Plant Species Observed Attachment B: Animal Species Observed or Detected References American Ornithological Society. 2020. AOU Checklist of North and Middle American Birds (online checklist). Retrieved from: http://checklist.aou.org/taxa/. Baldwin, B.G., D.H. Goldman, D.J. Keil, R. Patterson, T.J. Rosatti, and D.H. Wilken, editors. 2012. The Jepson Manual: Vascular Plants of California, second edition. University of California Press, Berkeley. Bradley, R.D., Ammerman, L.K., Baker, R.J., Bradley, L.C., Cook, J.A., Dowler, R.D. Jones, C., Schmidly, D.J, Stangi, F.B., Van De Bussche, R.A., Wursig, B. (2014). Revised checklist of North American California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). 2021a. California Natural Diversity Data Base (CNDDB). Special Vascular Plants, Bryophytes, and Lichens List. Retrieved from: https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=109383&inline. 2021b. RareFind Database Program, Version 5. 2021c. California Natural Diversity Database (CNDDB). Special Animal List. Retrieved from: https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=109406&inline. California Native Plant Society (CNPS). 2021. Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants (online edition). Rare Plant Program. California Native Plant Society, Sacramento, CA. Available at: http://www.rareplants.cnps.org/. Letter to Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Page 21 of 21 August 18, 2021 Faber-Langendoen, D., J. Nichols, L. Master, K. Snow, A. Tomaino, R. Bittman, G. Hammerson, B. Heidel, L. Ramsay, A. Teucher, and B. Young. 2012. NatureServe Conservation Status Assessments: Methodology for Assigning Ranks, Revised Edition. June. Retrieved from: http://www.natureserve.org/sites/default/files/publications/files/natureserveconservationstatu smethodology_jun12_0.pdf. Holland, R.F. 1986. Preliminary Descriptions of the Terrestrial Natural Communities of California. State of California, The Resources Agency, 156 pp. Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). 2021. Hydric Soils of the U.S. Available at: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/soils/use/hydric/. North American Butterfly Association. 2019. Checklist of North American Butterflies Occurring North of Mexico, Edition 2.3. Retrieved from: https://www.naba.org/pubs/enames2_3.html. Oberbauer, T., M. Kelly, and J. Buegge. 2008. Draft Vegetation Communities of San Diego County. Based on "Preliminary Descriptions of the Terrestrial Natural Communities of California," R. F. Holland, Ph.D., October 1986. March. Revised from 1996 and 2005. July. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles. 2021. North American Standard English and Scientific Names Database. Retrieved from: https://ssarherps.org/cndb/. South Coast Wildlands. 2008. South Coast missing linkages: A wildland network for the South Coast ecoregion. Retrieved from: http://www.scwildlands.org/reports/SCMLRegionalReport.pdf. March 2008. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). 2021a. USFWS Threatened and Endangered Species Active Critical Habitat Report. Available at: https://ecos.fws.gov/ecp/report/table/critical-habitat.html. 2021b. USFWS Species Records. 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Source: Base Map Layers (SanGIS, 2016) Regional Location Figure 1 This page intentionally left blank Cottonwood LS \P R O J E C T S \ O \ O W D \ O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 _ C o t t o n w o o d \ M a p \ B i o L e t t e r \ F i g 2 _ U S G S . m x d O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 3 / 2 / 2 0 2 1 - D Y I: 2,000 Feet K Project Site Source: JAMUL MOUNTAINS 7.5' Quad (USGS) Figure 2 USGS Topography 0 This page intentionally left blank Cottonwood LS Project Site \P R O J E C T S \ O \ O W D \ O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 _ C o t t o n w o o d \ M a p \ B i o L e t t e r \ F i g 3 _ A e r i a l .m x d O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 3 /2 / 2 0 2 1 - D Y Par Four Dr W i l d w i n d D r I:Source: Aerial (SanGIS, 2020)100 Feet K Figure 3 ograph Aerial Pho t 0 This page intentionally left blank Par Four Dr Par Four Dr W i l d w i n d D r GF Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project Site 100 ft Buffer Sensitive Resources F Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) San Diego Ambrosia (Ambrosia pumila) San Diego Ambrosia G USFWS Critical Habitat Hermes Copper Butterfly (Proposed, 2020) Coastal California Gnatcatcher (Final, 2007) San Diego Ambrosia (Final, 2010) Vegetation Diegan Coastal Sage Scrub Disturbed Habitat Urban/Developed \P R O J E C T S \ O \ O t a y W a t e r D i s t r i c t _ 0 0 6 2 3 \ O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 _ C o t t o n w o o d \ M a p \ B i o L e t t e r \ F i g 4 _ V e g e t a t i o n . m x d OW D - 0 6 . 0 6 6/ 2 5 / 2 0 2 1 - D Y :I Source: Aerial (SanGIS, 2019)0 75 Feet K Vegetation Communities and Sensitive Resources Figure 4 This page intentionally left blank  Attachment A Plant Species Observed This page intentionally left blank Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Attachment A Plant Species Observed A-1 Family Scientific Name Common Name Eudicots Asteraceae Ambrosia psilostachya western ragweed Ambrosia pumila† San Diego ambrosia Artemisia californica California sagebrush Baccharis pilularis coyote brush Baccharis sarothroides broom baccharis Isocoma menziesii goldenbush Lactuca serriola* wild lettuce Brassicaceae Hirschfeldia incana* short-pod mustard Chenopodiaceae Salsola tragus* Russian thistle Geraniaceae Erodium cicutarium* redstem filaree Lamiaceae Marrubium vulgare horehound Salvia mellifera black sage Pinaceae Pinus halepensis * Aleppo pine Polygonaceae Eriogonum fasciculatum buckwheat Scrophulariaceae Myoporum acuminatum* myoporum Tamaricaceae Tamarix ramosissima* saltcedar Monocots Arecaceae Washingtonia robusta* Mexican fan palm Poaceae Avena sp.* oats Bromus diandrus* common ripgut grass Bromus madritensis* foxtail chess Distichlis spicata saltgrass * Non-native species † Sensitive Species This page intentionally left blank Attachment B Animal Species Observed or Detected This page intentionally left blank Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Attachment B Animal Species Observed or Detected B-1 Taxon Scientific Common Name Name Order Family VERTEBRATES Birds Accipitriformes Accipitridae Accipiter cooperi† Cooper’s hawk Buteo jamaicensis red-tailed hawk Buteo lineatus red shouldered hawk Cathartidae Cathartes aura turkey vulture Anseriformes Anatidae Anas platyrhynchos mallard Apodiformes Trochilidae Calypte anna Anna's hummingbird Columbiformes Columbidae Zenaida macroura mourning dove Passeriformes Aegithalidae Psaltriparus minimus bushtit Corvidae Corvus brachyrhynchos American crow Fringillidae Haemorhous mexicanus house finch Spinus psaltria lesser goldfinch Hirundinidae Tachycineta bicolor tree swallow Icteridae Agelaius phoeniceus red-winged blackbird Quiscalus mexicanus great-tailed grackle Parulidae Setophaga coronate yellow-rumped warbler Passerellidae Melospiza melodia song sparrow Sittidae Sitta carolinensis white-breasted nuthatch Sturnidae Sturnus vulgaris European starling Tyrannidae Sayornis nigricans black phoebe Piciformes Picidae Picoides nuttallii Nuttall’s woodpecker Mammals Carnivora Canidae Canis latrans coyote Lagomorpha Leporidae Sylvilagus audubonii desert cottontail Rodentia Geomyidae Thomomys bottae Botta’s pocket gopher †Sensitive Species This page intentionally left blank Initial Study Appendix C Cultural Resources Study This page intentionally left blank HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc. 7578 El Cajon Boulevard La Mesa, CA 91942 619.462.1515 tel 619.462.0552 fax www.helixepi.com April 7, 2021 OWD-06.06 Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd Otay Water District 2554 Sweetwater Springs Boulevard Spring Valley, CA 91978-2096 Subject: Cultural Resources Study for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project Dear Ms. Coburn-Boyd: HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc. (HELIX) was contracted to conduct a cultural resources study for the proposed Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project (project) in the unincorporated community of Jamul in eastern San Diego County. HELIX conducted a record search, a Sacred Lands File search, and a field survey of the project area. This letter report details the methods and results of the cultural resources study. In summary, no significant cultural resources were identified within the project area and no impacts to historical resources, per the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), are anticipated. However, due to the cultural sensitivity of the Sweetwater River valley and the alluvial setting of the project site, a cultural resources monitoring program is recommended for the construction of the project. PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND LOCATION The 0.37-acre project site is located in the community of Jamul, south of Interstate (I-) 8, between State Route (SR) 54 to the northwest and SR 94 to the south and southwest (Figure 1, Regional Location). The project area is located within Township 16 South, Range 1 East in an unsectioned portion of the Jamacho Land Grant, on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5-minute Jamul Mountains quadrangle map (Figure 2, USGS Topography). The project site extends north from the western terminus of Par 4 Drive, approximately 1,500 feet west of Steele Canyon Road, and is partially within an abandoned area of the golf course associated with the Cottonwood Golf Club (Figure 3, Aerial Photograph). Otay Water District (OWD) proposes to replace an existing sewer lift station with a new and expanded sewer lift station on the adjacent property and expand an existing access road that provides access to the lift station. The proposed lift station would have a capacity of between 500 and 600 gallons per minute (gpm) and would replace the existing 400-gpm lift station. The expanded capacity would be to serve anticipated development in the area. In addition to expanding lift station capacity, the project would increase the overall property area to allow for storage and greater functionality (e.g., maintenance trucks being able to turn around). Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 2 of 12 April 7, 2021 Construction of the project would require site preparation to clear existing vegetation, excavation for the below-grade portions of the lift station, light grading for the site area surrounding the lift station and for the expanded access road, construction of the lift station structure and site area pad, installation and connection of facilities, paving, and demolition of existing structures. Excavation is currently estimated to result in 1,500 cubic yards of export. Construction staging would occur either within the project site or within adjacent disturbed areas of the abandoned golf course. METHODS HELIX obtained a record search of the project area and a half-mile radius from the South Coastal Information Center (SCIC) on February 23, 2021. Reports of previous cultural resources studies covering the project site or adjacent areas, site forms for archaeological and historical resources documented within or adjacent to the project site, and historic maps and aerial photographs were reviewed. A site visit of the project area was conducted by HELIX archaeologist Julie Roy and Bobo Elliot of Jamul Indian Village on February 25, 2021. The Native American Heritage Commission (NAHC) was contacted for a Sacred Lands File search on February 23, 2021. The NAHC responded on March 8, 2021, indicating that the search results were positive and that the Ewiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, the Kwaaymii Laguna Band of Mission Indians, and the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians should be contacted for more information. A list of tribal contacts from whom additional information can be solicited was provided with the NAHC’s response–letters were sent to these contacts on March 23, 2021. The correspondence from the NAHC is included as Attachment A to this letter report. CULTURAL BACKGROUND The project area is in the traditional territory of the Kumeyaay people, whose population in San Diego in the late 1700s was estimated to be 20,000. The Kumeyaay lived in semi-sedentary, politically autonomous villages or rancherias. Most rancherias were the seat of a clan, although it is thought that, aboriginally, some clans had more than one rancheria and some rancherias contained more than one clan, often depending on the season within the year (Luomala 1978). Each village was comprised of many households, and groups of villages were part of a larger social system, referred to as a consanguineal kin group (cimuL) (Carrico 1998). Campsites and villages were chosen based on proximity to water, boulder outcrops, environmental protection, and availability of plants and animals (Luomala 1978). Consequently, many of the Kumeyaay villages or rancherias were located in river valleys and along the shoreline of coastal estuaries (Bean and Shipek 1978; Carrico 1998; Kroeber 1925 [1976]). Several major villages were located along the Sweetwater River, including Hamacha (Jamacho) and Metí, located downriver from the project, and Matamo and Sekwan, located upriver from the project (Carrico 2008). Jamacho is documented archaeologically on the northern banks of the Sweetwater River at Jamacha Junction, approximately 0.5 mile to the west (downriver) of the project site (Carrico 2008; Heuett 1979; Shipek 1976). The village is described by Florence Shipek as “a main village area, near junction with Sweetwater, and then scattered groups of houses up and down both sides of valley of river and side canyons such as Steele Canyon” (Shipek 1976). Archaeological investigations undertaken at this location, recorded as CA-SDI-4782 (P-37-004782), yielded evidence of habitation, with over 4,400 artifacts and ecofacts being recovered on the surface or subsurface (Heuett 1979). Occupation of the site dates to AD 1000, but it may have elements dating to 3000 BC (Rosen 1983 in Pigniolo et al. 1992). Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 3 of 12 April 7, 2021 During the Spanish Period, the priests at Mission San Diego de Alcalá ‘granted’ a portion of the mission’s grazing land in Jamacha Valley to Doña Apolinaria Lorenzana, in order to try to preserve what they could of the lands they perceived as belonging to the mission (Van Wormer 1981). After Mexico declared its independence in 1821, the Mexican government began granting parcels of land to influential individuals in Mexican society. In 1833, Lorenzana applied to the Mexican government for ownership of Jamachá, and in 1840, Rancho Jacome de la Marca, or Jamacha, was granted to her by Governor Juan Alvarado (Van Wormer 1981). In 1841, the new Mexican government reaffirmed the grant, which consisted of 8,881 acres from the eastern borders of Rancho de la Nación east about 8 miles along Sweetwater Valley (Brackett 1951). American governance in California began in 1848, when Mexico signed the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, ceding the state to the United States at the end of the Mexican-American War. The discovery of gold in California in 1848, the end of the Civil War in 1865, and the availability of free land through the passage of the Homestead Act all caused an influx of settlers into California and the San Diego region. The Land Act of 1851 established a board of commissioners to review land grant claims, and land patents for the land grants were issued throughout the following years. In 1852, Lorenzana submitted a petition to the Land Commission for Rancho Jamacha (Van Wormer 1981). By this time, the rancho was being used for cattle grazing by American Colonel John Blankhead Magruder, who then purchased the land from Lorenzana in January 1853. Later that same year Magruder sold two-thirds of rancho to Eugene Pendleton, Frank Ames, and Asher Eddy; the four men, along with Robert Kelly, had formed a partnership in 1852 (Van Wormer 1981). Although she was no longer the owner of Rancho Jamacha by this time, Lorenzana received the patent to the rancho on April 11, 1871. In San Diego County, the 1880s were characterized by “boom and bust” cycles that brought thousands of people to the area. By the end of the decade, many had left, although some remained to form the foundations of small communities based on dry farming, orchards, dairies, and livestock ranching. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, rural areas of San Diego County developed small agricultural communities, consisting of individuals and families tied together through geographical boundaries, a common schoolhouse, and a church. While the various ranches and landholders within Jamacha Valley enjoyed decades of successful farming and ranching endeavors, in 1922 the post office in Jamacha closed, and by the early 1930s, much of the land within and surrounding the project vicinity had changed through several owners. A majority of the valley ultimately came under the ownership of the California Water and Telephone Company, which was the successor of the Sweetwater Company, who had taken over the operation of Sweetwater Dam in 1902 (Van Wormer 1981). The influence of military development, beginning in 1916 and 1917 during World War I, and the need to fight a two-ocean war during World War II resulted in substantial development of infrastructure and industry within the San Diego area to support the military and accommodate soldiers, sailors, and defense industry workers. In the 1950s and 1960s, a population boom and the development of infrastructure, such as freeways and aqueducts, pushed residential development further into the eastern areas of San Diego, including the Jamacha Valley. During this time, the California Water and Telephone Company landholdings were transferred to Cotton Wood Acreage, and in 1970, to the Associated Land Company. However, a small portion of land had been set aside for the Cottonwood Golf Course and was not included in this acquisition. The Associated Land Company envisioned building 6,000 homes in the Jamacha Valley surrounding the golf course (Van Wormer 1981). Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 4 of 12 April 7, 2021 In the 1970s, the urban development of Rancho San Diego began, with the first subdivision for a portion of the Rancho San Diego village, Sweetwater Village West, being filed (County of San Diego 1996). By 1979, the remainder of Rancho San Diego, encompassing almost 3,000 acres, was approved for a Specific Plan allowing over 6,300 residential units, shopping centers, and community land uses. By 2000, the population of Rancho San Diego reached over 20,000 people. RESULTS A total of 20 previous cultural resources studies have been performed within the half-mile records search radius around the project alignment; of these, eight overlap with the project site (Table 1, Previous Studies within a Half-Mile of the Project Area). These reports include three environmental documents (Mooney-Lettieri and Associates 1987; Jacks and Lacy 1990; PRC Toups Corporation 1979), the results of two archaeological investigations (Byrd et al. 1993; Heuett 1979), the results of a data recovery program (Schaefer, Cook, and Pallette 1992), a cultural resources survey (Pigniolo, Lauko, and Linton 2005), and a historic resources inventory (Carrico et al. 1990). In addition to the reports on file at the SCIC, an archaeological inventory and assessment and a historic resources evaluation report have been recently prepared for the Cottonwood Sand Mine Project (Reinicke and Mengers 2020; Wilson and Roy 2021). These reports are on file at HELIX and were reviewed for this study. Table 1 PREVIOUS STUDIES WITHIN A HALF-MILE OF THE PROJECT AREA Report No. (SD-) Report Title Author, Date 00179 An Archaeological Survey: Proposed Willow Glen Drive Sewer Main Barbolla-Roland and Axford, 1984 00576 Appendix A - Cottonwood Meadows Archaeological Survey Report Carrico, 1977 01986 APS/SDG&E Interconnection Project Transmission System Environmental Study Phase Two Corridor Studies Cultural Resources: Archaeology Appendices Wirth Associates, 1974 02175* Draft Environmental Impact Report for Rancho San Diego Specific Plan Mooney-Lettieri and Associates, Inc., 1987 02439* Appendices for Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Report for Rancho San Diego Tentative Map Jacks and Lacy, 1990 02591 Cultural Resources Background and Walkover Survey of a Proposed El Cajon/Rancho San Diego Main Post Office, San Diego County Rasson, 1992 03334 Archaeological Testing at CA-SDI-4763, Locus 2 for the Jamacha Boulevard Improvements Project, El Cajon, San Diego County, California Robbins-Wade and Whitehouse, 1995 03702 Cultural Resource Survey Report Form for the Ridge at Willow Glen (County PIA-98001) Jamacha Valley, San Diego County, California Wade and Van Wormer, 1998 03836 Southwest Powerlink Cultural Resources Management Plan Townsend, 1984 04849 APS/SDG&E Interconnection Project System Environmental Study Phase II Corridor Studies Native American Cultural Resources Wirth Associates, 1980 05345* Environmental Impact Report Rancho San Diego Specific Plan San Diego County, California Appendices Volume II PRC Toups Corporation, 1979 06425* Historic Resources Inventory Sweetwater Valley Carrico et al., 1990 08145 Results of Cultural Resource Survey for the Proposed Miguel- Mission 230 KV #2 Project, San Diego County, California Collett and Cheever, 2002 Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 5 of 12 April 7, 2021 Report No. (SD-) Report Title Author, Date 08620* Preliminary Archaeological Investigations of W-1146 Spring Valley, California Heuett, 1979 09827* Preliminary Report for the Archaeological Data Recovery Program at CA-SDI-4765 Rancho San Diego - Jamacha Village West, San Diego County, California Schaefer, Cook, and Pallette, 1992 10346* Cultural Resources Survey for the Cottonwood Golf Course Enhancement L-Grade Project, Rancho San Diego, California Pigniolo, Lauko, and Linton, 2005 10475 Archaeological Survey Results for the Loma Del Sol Project Berryman, 1986 10478 An Archaeological Reconnaissance of Windmill Farms San Diego County Schiowitz, 1978 11626 Draft Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Acquisition of Rancho San Diego, Sweetwater II, and Lot 707 Properties from the Resolution Trust Corporation for the Proposed San Diego National Wildlife Refuge Otay-Sweetwater Refuge Unit U.S. Department of the Interior, 1995 15094* Multi-Component Archaic and Late Prehistoric Residential Camps Along the Sweetwater River, Rancho San Diego, California Byrd et al., 1993 * Overlaps project area The records search results indicated that eight cultural resources have been previously identified within the half-mile radius surrounding the project site, one of which contains the project area (Table 2, Previously Recorded Resources within a Half Mile of the Project Area). The project area lies within the southernmost reach of P-37-039116, the Cottonwood Golf Club, which consists of two 18-hole golf courses, associated structures, landscaping, and infrastructure. First recorded in 2019, construction of the Cottonwood Golf Club began in 1962 with the Lakes Course, formerly known as the Monte Vista Course, on the western side of the property and the Ivanhoe Course on the eastern side; this included channeling the Sweetwater River within the property (Reinicke 2019). The clubhouse, parking lot, maintenance facility, and the Ivanhoe Course were completed by 1964, and the Lakes Course was completed by 1968. Between 1989 and 1993, the Lakes Course was extended to the southwest (Reinicke 2019). This resource was documented and evaluated as part of the proposed Cottonwood Sand Mine Project and was found to be not eligible for the California Register of Historical Resources (CRHR) or San Diego County Local Register of Historic Resources (Reinicke and Mengers 2020). Table 2 PREVIOUSLY RECORDED RESOURCES WITHIN A HALF MILE OF THE PROJECT AREA Resource Number (P-37-) Resource Number (CA-SDI-) Age and Site Type Description Recorder, Date 004761 4761 Multi- component Site Artifact scatter containing pottery sherds, ground stone fragments, lithic tools and flakes, a rifle cartridge, and a sherd of Majolica San Elizario Polychrome. Cupples, 1972 004762 4762 Prehistoric Site Artifact scatter containing ground stone and lithic artifacts. Fink, 1972 Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 6 of 12 April 7, 2021 Resource Number (P-37-) Resource Number (CA-SDI-) Age and Site Type Description Recorder, Date 004767 4767 Prehistoric Site Milling station with associated artifact scatter containing lithic and ground stone artifacts. Cupples, 1972; Schiowitz, 1978 004883 4883 Prehistoric Site Artifact scatter containing a lithic scatter, a pestle fragment, and a shell. Corum, Wessel, Pilgram, and Fulmer, 1976 004968 4968 Prehistoric Site Three bedrock milling complexes with seven slicks Carrico, 1977 016544 Historic Building A house and several dilapidated sheds and animal enclosures. Van Wormer, 1998 039116* Historic Site The Cottonwood Golf Club, constructed between 1962 and1968, and consisting of two 18-hole golf courses, associated structures, landscaping, and infrastructure. Reinicke, 2019 039117 Historic Building A single-family residence and associated garage built between 1900 and 1920s. Reinicke, 2019 * Contains project area Geologically, the project area is underlain by unconsolidated Holocene alluvial deposits (Tan 2002). The northern half of the project area contains soil from the Visalia series, while the southern half contains soils from the Vista series, which consist of moderately deep, well drained soils that formed from decomposed granite (Natural Resources Conservation Service 2012). The Sweetwater River is recorded to the north of the project in the 1903 Cuyamaca (1:125,000) topographic map. A few roads are recorded near the project, though none intersect it and there are no structures recorded in the vicinity. The 1943 Jamul (1: 62,500) topographic map shows much the same– SR 94 is shown to the south of the project. No structures are visible within the project area or the area surrounding it in the 1953 historic aerial photograph, though a structure is seen to the south of the project in the 1964 aerial (NETR Online 2021). This structure is recorded on the 1955 Jamul Mountain (1:2400) topographic map; the map also shows Jamacha Road to the north and what would later become Steele Canyon Road to the east. Farmland is visible to the south and east of the project area in the 1964, 1966, 1968, and 1971 aerials; this area appears to have been graded prior to the time the 1980 aerial was taken in preparation of housing development construction (NETR Online 2021). The 1971 and 1975 Jamul Mountains (1:24,000) topographic maps show the development of the surrounding area, as well as the construction of the golf course immediately north and west of the project area. During the site visit conducted by HELIX and Jamul Indian Village, transects were walked in 5-meter intervals within the project site, which included a paved road and golf course tee off area that is no longer in use (Plates 1 through 4). The project area appeared to be heavily disturbed due to construction of the existing sewer line and lift station, as well as the nearby paved road, residential structures, and golf course (see Plates 1 and 2). Ground visibility within the survey area was good–ranging from 70 to 100 percent, though the presence of grass and dead weeds obscured the ground surface in some places (see Plates 2 and 3). Vegetation in the area consisted of non-native ornamental trees and shrubs, eucalyptus, pine trees, and weeds. Observed soils consisted of orange-brown sand and a yellow-brown fill material with a small amount of gravel within the golf course. No cultural resources were observed. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 7 of 12 April 7, 2021 As noted above, the entirety of the Cottonwood Golf Club, which consists of two 18-hole golf courses, associated structures, landscaping, and infrastructure, has been previously documented as P-37-039116. Plate 1. Overview of Par Four Drive with existing sewer line. View to the south. Plate 2. Overview of project area along fence line. View to the north. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 8 of 12 April 7, 2021 Plate 3. Overview of northwestern portion of project area. View to the northwest. Plate 4. Lift Station at the end of Par Four Drive. View to the north. As discussed above, the Sacred Lands File search response was received from the NAHC on March 8, 2021 and indicated that the results were positive for the project area and that the Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, the Kwaaymii Laguna Band of Mission Indians, and the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians (Viejas) should be contacted for more information. A list of tribal contacts from whom additional information can be solicited was provided with the NAHC’s response–letters were sent to these contacts on March 23, 2021. To date, one response has been received: the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians stated that the area containing the project site has cultural significance or ties to Viejas. Additionally, Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 9 of 12 April 7, 2021 Viejas requested that a Kumeyaay Native American monitor be on site for ground-disturbing activities and to be informed of any discoveries found during construction. During the survey, the Native American monitor stated that due of the sensitivity of the region surrounding the Sweetwater River, and because the original lift station and sewer line may not have been monitored at the time of construction, that the Jamul Indian Village requests cultural resource monitoring to be performed during ground-disturbance activities. RECOMMENDATIONS Based, on the results of the field survey, no impacts to cultural resources are expected to result from the proposed project. However, the Sacred Lands File search conducted by the NAHC was returned with positive results and, as shown by the background context and records search results, the project area is sensitive for cultural resources. The project site is also situated within alluvial deposits dating to the Holocene, in which buried cultural deposits may be present. As such, it is recommended that an archaeological and Native American monitoring program be implemented for the project to ensure no inadvertent impacts occur to unknown subsurface cultural resources. The monitoring program would include attendance by the archaeologist and a Kumeyaay Native American monitor at a preconstruction meeting with the construction contractor and the presence of archaeological and Native American monitors during initial ground-disturbing activities. Both archaeological and Native American monitors would have the authority to temporarily halt or redirect grading and other ground-disturbing activity in the event that cultural resources are encountered. If significant cultural material is encountered, the monitors will coordinate with District staff to develop and implement appropriate mitigation measures. If the excavations for the project are determined to be within disturbed soils with little potential for intact subsurface cultural material to be present, archaeological monitoring would be reduced or ceased. The Native American monitor shall determine the extent of their presence during soil-disturbing activities. If the Native American monitor determines that their presence is not warranted fulltime, their schedule will be adjusted accordingly. If you have any questions regarding this cultural resources study, please email Stacie Wilson at staciew@helixepi.com or call her at (619) 462-1515. James Turner, RPA Stacie Wilson, RPA Archaeologist Senior Archaeologist Attachments: Figure 1 : Regional Location Figure 2 : USGS Topography Figure 3: Aerial Photograph Attachment A: NAHC Correspondence Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 10 of 12 April 7, 2021 REFERENCES Bean, Lowell John, and Florence C. Shipek 1978 Luiseño. In California, edited by Robert F. Heizer, pp. 550-563. Handbook of North American Indians, vol. 8. William C. Sturtevant, general editor. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Brackett, Robert W. 1951 The History of San Diego County Ranchos: The Spanish, Mexican, and American Occupation of San Diego County and the Story of the Ownership of Land Grants Therein. 4th ed. Union Title Insurance and Trust Company, San Diego, California. San Diego Historical Society. Electronic document available at: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.31822035077981;view=1up;seq=25, accessed on February 19, 2021. Byrd, Brian, Carol Serr, Lynne Christenson, John Beezley, Margaret Newman, M. Steven Shackley, and Thomas Origer 1993 Multi-Component Archaic and Late Prehistoric Residential Camps Along the Sweetwater River, Rancho San Diego, California. Report on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. Carrico, Richard L. 1998 Ethnohistoric Period. In Prehistoric and Historic Archaeology of Metropolitan San Diego: A Historic Properties Background Study. Prepared for the Metropolitan Wastewater Department, City of San Diego. ASM Affiliates: Encinitas, California. 2008 Strangers in a Stolen Land: Indians of San Diego County from Prehistory to the New Deal. Sunbelt Publications, San Diego. Carrico, Richard, Susan H. Carrico, Kathleen A. Crawford, and S. Kathleen Flanigan 1990 Historic Resources Inventory Sweetwater Valley. Report on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. County of San Diego 1996 Rancho San Diego Specific Plan, SPA 13-001. Prepared for North Island Credit Union. Last approved and amended by The Board of Supervisors on December 4, 3013. Heuett, Mary Lou 1979 Preliminary Archaeological Investigations of W-1146, Spring Valley, California. Prepared for Rancho San Diego, El Cajon. San Diego, California: Archaeological Consulting & Technology. Report on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. Jacks, Paula and Stephen Lacy 1990 Appendices for Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Report for Rancho San Diego Tentative Map. Report on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 11 of 12 April 7, 2021 Kroeber, A.L. 1925 Handbook of California Indians. Originally published 1925 as Bulletin 78 of the Bureau of American Ethnology of the Smithsonian Institution. Republished in 1976 by Dover, New York. Luomala, Katherine 1978 Tipai-Ipai. In California, edited by Robert F. Heizer, pp. 592-609. Handbook of North American Indians, vol. 8. William C. Sturtevant, general editor. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Mooney-Lettieri and Associates, Inc 1987 Draft Environmental Impact Report for Rancho San Diego Specific Plan. Report on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. Natural Resources Conservation Series 2012 Vista Series. United States Department of Agriculture. Electronic document available at: https://soilseries.sc.egov.usda.gov/OSD_Docs/V/VISTA.html, accessed February 19, 2021. NETR Online 2021 Historic Aerials. Nationwide Environmental Title Research, LLC. Electronic document available at: http://www.historicaerials.com , accessed February 19, 2021. Pigniolo, Andrew, C. Schultze, and T. Webb 1992 Site record form for CA-SDI-4782 (P-37-004782). Record on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. Pigniolo, Andrew, Kimberly Lauko, and Clinton Linton 2005 Cultural Resources Survey for the Cottonwood Golf Course Enhancement L-Grade Project, Rancho San Diego, California. Report on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. PRC Toups Corporation 1979 Environmental Impact Report Rancho San Diego Specific Plan San Diego County, California Appendices Volume II. Report on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. Reinicke, Kris 2019 Site record form for P-37-039116. Record on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. Reinicke, Kris and Douglass Mengers 2020 Historic Resources Evaluation Report for the Cottonwood Sand Mine Project, San Diego County, California. Prepared for the County of San Diego Department of Planning and Land Use. PanGIS: San Diego, California. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 12 of 12 April 7, 2021 Schaefer, Jerry, John R. Cook, and Drew Pallette 1992 Preliminary Report for the Archaeological Data Recovery Program at CA-SDI-4765 Rancho San Diego - Jamacha Village West, San Diego County, California. Report on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. Shipek, Florence C. 1976 Site form for SDM-W-1146. In Confidential Appendix A of Archeological Testing at CA- SDI-4760 for the Willow Glen Drive Road Widening Project, El Cajon, San Diego County, California. Report prepared by Affinis for the County of San Diego. Report on file at the South Coastal Information Center, San Diego State University, San Diego. Tan, Siang 2002 Geologic Map of the Jamul Mountains 7.5’ Quadrangle San Diego County, California. U.S. Geological Survey. Van Wormer, Stephen R. 1981 A History of the Jamacha Valley. Report prepared by Archaeological Consulting and Technology for the Rancho San Diego Land Company. Report on file HELIX. Wilson, Stacie and Julie Roy 2021 Archaeological Inventory and Assessment: Cottonwood Sand Mine Project. Report prepared by HELIX for the County of San Diego Planning and Development Office. 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San Die g o B a y ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! UNITED STATES ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! MEXICO ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ORANGECOUNTY RIVERSIDECOUNTYSAN DIEGOCOUNTY ! CAMP PENDLETON FALLBROOK ?³ ! O'Neill Lake ?¹ ! Vail Lake !"a$ Cottonwood LS ? WARNER ¹ SPRINGS Lake Henshaw !"^$OCEANS IDE VISTA WÌ ! Lake Wohlford ?¸ SANMARCOS ! CAR LSBAD ESCOND IDO ! LakeSan Marcos SutherlandReservoir !!"a$?¸ ENCINITAS ! WÌ LakeHodges ? JULI¸ Lake Ramona ?RAMONA¦ SOLANABEACH ! Lake Poway POWAY DEL MAR ?t ! WÊ San VicenteReservoir Miramar Reservoir \P R O J E C T S \ O \ O W D \ O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 _ C o t t o n w o o d \ M a p \ C U L \ F i g 1 _ R e g i o n a l .m x d O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 2 /1 9 / 2 0 2 1 - D Y PacificOcean El Capitan Reservoir %&s(?¦Santee SANTEE Lakes JOLALL !"^$A CORONADO ?n Lake Jennings !"_$ AN ! ?¹ ALPINE !"a$ Ag DSANIEGO !"_$ LakeMurray EL CAJON ! Aä Loveland ReservoirLA MESA ?p ?Ë LEMONGROVE NATIONAL CITY SweetwatReservoi?p AäCHULA VISTA IMPERIALBEACH ! !"^$% % &u( &s( OTAY ! TIJUANA ! er OtayReservo Project Site Barrett Lake r ?Ë ir DULZURA I: 0 8 Miles K ! Source: Base Map Layers (SanGIS, 2016) Regional Location Figure 1 This page intentionally left blank Cottonwood LS \P R O J E C T S \ O \ O W D \ O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 _ C o t t o n w o o d \ M a p \ C U L \ F i g 2 _ U S G S . m x d O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 2 / 1 9 / 2 0 2 1 - D Y I: 2,000 Feet K Project Site Source: JAMUL MOUNTAINS 7.5' Quad (USGS) Figure 2 USGS Topography 0 This page intentionally left blank Cottonwood LS Project Site \P R O J E C T S \ O \ O W D \ O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 _ C o t t o n w o o d \ M a p \ C U L \ F i g 3 _ A e r i a l .m x d O W D - 0 6 . 0 6 2 /1 9 / 2 0 2 1 - D Y Par Four Dr W i l d w i n d D r I:Source: Aerial (SanGIS, 2020)100 Feet K Figure 3 ograph Aerial Pho t 0 This page intentionally left blank Attachment A NAHC Correspondence This page intentionally left blank STATE OF CALIFORNIA Gavin Newsom, Governor NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE COMMISSION Page 1 of 1 March 8, 2021 Stacie Wilson HELIX Environmental Planning Via Email to: staciew@helixepi.com Re: Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project, San Diego County Dear Ms. Wilson: A record search of the Native American Heritage Commission (NAHC) Sacred Lands File (SLF) was completed for the information you have submitted for the above referenced project. The results were positive. Please contact the Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, the Kwaaymii Laguna Band of Mission Indians, and the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians on the attached list for more information. Please also contact the Kumeyaay Cultural Repatriation Committee via phone at (760) 803-5694 for more information. Other sources of cultural resources should also be contacted for information regarding known and recorded sites. Attached is a list of Native American tribes who may also have knowledge of cultural resources in the project area. This list should provide a starting place in locating areas of potential adverse impact within the proposed project area. I suggest you contact all of those indicated; if they cannot supply information, they might recommend others with specific knowledge. By contacting all those listed, your organization will be better able to respond to claims of failure to consult with the appropriate tribe. If a response has not been received within two weeks of notification, the Commission requests that you follow-up with a telephone call or email to ensure that the project information has been received. If you receive notification of change of addresses and phone numbers from tribes, please notify me. With your assistance, we can assure that our lists contain current information. If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact me at my email address: Andrew.Green@nahc.ca.gov. Sincerely, Andrew Green Cultural Resources Analyst Attachment CHAIRPERSON Laura Miranda Luiseño VICE CHAIRPERSON Reginald Pagaling Chumash SECRETARY Merri Lopez-Keifer Luiseño PARLIAMENTARIAN Russell Attebery Karuk COMMISSIONER William Mungary Paiute/White Mountain Apache COMMISSIONER Julie Tumamait-Stenslie Chumash COMMISSIONER [Vacant] COMMISSIONER [Vacant] COMMISSIONER [Vacant] EXECUTIVE SECRETARY Christina Snider Pomo NAHC HEADQUARTERS 1550 Harbor Boulevard Suite 100 West Sacramento, California 95691 (916) 373-3710 nahc@nahc.ca.gov NAHC.ca.gov This page intentionally left blank Barona Group of the Capitan Grande Edwin Romero, Chairperson 1095 Barona Road Lakeside, CA, 92040 Phone: (619) 443 - 6612 Fax: (619) 443-0681 cloyd@barona-nsn.gov Diegueno Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians Ralph Goff, Chairperson 36190 Church Road, Suite 1 Campo, CA, 91906 Phone: (619) 478 - 9046 Fax: (619) 478-5818 rgoff@campo-nsn.gov Diegueno Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians Robert Pinto, Chairperson 4054 Willows Road Alpine, CA, 91901 Phone: (619) 445 - 6315 Fax: (619) 445-9126 wmicklin@leaningrock.net Diegueno Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians Michael Garcia, Vice Chairperson 4054 Willows Road Alpine, CA, 91901 Phone: (619) 445 - 6315 Fax: (619) 445-9126 michaelg@leaningrock.net Diegueno Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel Clint Linton, Director of Cultural Resources P.O. Box 507 Santa Ysabel, CA, 92070 Phone: (760) 803 - 5694 cjlinton73@aol.com Diegueno Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel Virgil Perez, Chairperson P.O. Box 130 Santa Ysabel, CA, 92070 Phone: (760) 765 - 0845 Fax: (760) 765-0320 Diegueno Inaja-Cosmit Band of Indians Rebecca Osuna, Chairperson 2005 S. Escondido Blvd. Escondido, CA, 92025 Phone: (760) 737 - 7628 Fax: (760) 747-8568 Diegueno Jamul Indian Village Erica Pinto, Chairperson P.O. Box 612 Jamul, CA, 91935 Phone: (619) 669 - 4785 Fax: (619) 669-4817 epinto@jiv-nsn.gov Diegueno Jamul Indian Village Lisa Cumper, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer P.O. Box 612 Jamul, CA, 91935 Phone: (619) 669 - 4855 lcumper@jiv-nsn.gov Diegueno Kwaaymii Laguna Band of Mission Indians Carmen Lucas, P.O. Box 775 Pine Valley, CA, 91962 Phone: (619) 709 - 4207 Kwaaymii Diegueno La Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians Gwendolyn Parada, Chairperson 8 Crestwood Road Boulevard, CA, 91905 Phone: (619) 478 - 2113 Fax: (619) 478-2125 LP13boots@aol.com Diegueno La Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians Javaughn Miller, Tribal Administrator 8 Crestwood Road Boulevard, CA, 91905 Phone: (619) 478 - 2113 Fax: (619) 478-2125 jmiller@LPtribe.net Diegueno 1 of 2 This list is current only as of the date of this document. Distribution of this list does not relieve any person of statutory responsibility as defined in Section 7050.5 of the Health and Safety Code, Section 5097.94 of the Public Resource Section 5097.98 of the Public Resources Code. This list is only applicable for contacting local Native Americans with regard to cultural resources assessment for the proposed Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project, San Diego County. PROJ-2021- 001246 03/08/2021 11:29 AM Native American Heritage Commission Native American Contact List San Diego County 3/8/2021 Manzanita Band of Kumeyaay Nation Angela Elliott Santos, Chairperson P.O. Box 1302 Boulevard, CA, 91905 Phone: (619) 766 - 4930 Fax: (619) 766-4957 Diegueno Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians Michael Linton, Chairperson P.O Box 270 Santa Ysabel, CA, 92070 Phone: (760) 782 - 3818 Fax: (760) 782-9092 mesagrandeband@msn.com Diegueno San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians Allen Lawson, Chairperson P.O. Box 365 Valley Center, CA, 92082 Phone: (760) 749 - 3200 Fax: (760) 749-3876 allenl@sanpasqualtribe.org Diegueno San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians John Flores, Environmental Coordinator P. O. Box 365 Valley Center, CA, 92082 Phone: (760) 749 - 3200 Fax: (760) 749-3876 johnf@sanpasqualtribe.org Diegueno Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation Cody Martinez, Chairperson 1 Kwaaypaay Court El Cajon, CA, 92019 Phone: (619) 445 - 2613 Fax: (619) 445-1927 ssilva@sycuan-nsn.gov Kumeyaay Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation Kristie Orosco, Kumeyaay Resource Specialist 1 Kwaaypaay Court El Cajon, CA, 92019 Phone: (619) 445 - 6917 Kumeyaay Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians John Christman, Chairperson 1 Viejas Grade Road Alpine, CA, 91901 Phone: (619) 445 - 3810 Fax: (619) 445-5337 Diegueno Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians Ernest Pingleton, Tribal Historic Officer, Resource Management 1 Viejas Grade Road Alpine, CA, 91901 Phone: (619) 659 - 2314 epingleton@viejas-nsn.gov Diegueno 2 of 2 This list is current only as of the date of this document. Distribution of this list does not relieve any person of statutory responsibility as defined in Section 7050.5 of the Health and Safety Code, Section 5097.94 of the Public Resource Section 5097.98 of the Public Resources Code. This list is only applicable for contacting local Native Americans with regard to cultural resources assessment for the proposed Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project, San Diego County. PROJ-2021- 001246 03/08/2021 11:29 AM Native American Heritage Commission Native American Contact List San Diego County 3/8/2021 From:Ray Teran To:Stacie Wilson Cc:Ernest Pingleton Subject:Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Date:Friday, April 02, 2021 12:52:21 PM The Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians (“Viejas”) has reviewed the proposed project and at this time we have determined that the project site has cultural significance or ties to Viejas. Cultural resources have been located within or adjacent to the APE-DE of the proposed project. Viejas Band request that a Kumeyaay Cultural Monitor be on site for ground disturbing activities and to inform us of any new developments such as inadvertent discovery of cultural artifacts, cremation sites, or human remains. If you wish to utilize Viejas cultural monitors, please call Ernest Pingleton at 619-655-0410 or email, epingleton@viejas-nsn.gov, for contracting and scheduling. Thank you. If a Tribe, having a closer proximity to the Project, requests to perform cultural monitoring, Viejas will differ to them.         Ray Teran     Viejas Tribal Government Resource Management Director               619-659-2312         rteran@viejas-nsn.gov This page intentionally left blank Initial Study Appendix D Noise Impact Analysis This page intentionally left blank HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc. 7578 El Cajon Boulevard La Mesa, CA 91942 619.462.1515 tel 619.462.0552 fax www.helixepi.com April 8, 2021 OWD-06.06 Lisa Coburn-Boyd Otay Water District 2554 Sweetwater Boulevard Spring Valley, CA 91978-2096 Subject: Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project – Noise Impact Analysis Dear Ms. Coburn-Boyd: HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc. (HELIX) has performed an analysis of construction and operational noise impacts for the proposed Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project (Project). This letter summarizes the methodology and results of the noise analysis. PROJECT LOCATION The Project is located in the unincorporated community of Jamul in eastern San Diego County, 0.9 mile north of State Route (SR) 94 and 0.6 mile southeast of SR 54 (see Figure 1, Regional Location). The Project site extends north from the western terminus of Par 4 Drive, approximately 1,500 feet west of Steele Canyon Road, and is partially within an abandoned area of the golf course associated with the Cottonwood Golf Club (see Figure 2, Aerial Photograph). Access to the site is provided via Par 4 Drive and Steele Canyon Road, either from SR 94 to the south or from Willow Glen Drive and SR 54 to the north. PROJECT DESCRIPTION Otay Water District (OWD) proposes the Project to replace an existing sewer lift station with a new and expanded sewer lift station on the adjacent property and expand an existing access road that provides access to the lift station. The existing lift station is located within a 40-foot by 40-foot OWD easement. The existing access road runs south from the existing lift station through a 20-foot wide by 312-foot long OWD easement to the western terminus of Par 4 Drive. The total area of the existing easement is 0.18 acre. As part of the Project, OWD would acquire 0.19 acre of property to the west of the existing easements, resulting in a total Project site area of 0.37 acre (see Figure 3, Site Plan). The proposed lift station would have a capacity of between 500 and 600 gallons per minute (gpm) and would replace the existing 400-gpm lift station. The expanded capacity would be to serve anticipated development in the area. In addition to expanding lift station capacity, the Project would increase the Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 2 of 17 April 8, 2021 overall property area to allow for storage and greater functionality (e.g., maintenance trucks being able to turn around). The Project site would include the lift station structure, a diesel-powered backup generator, an emergency storage tank, an existing transformer (to remain), and the expanded access road. The lift station structure would house a below-grade wet well and dry well, two 40-horsepower (HP) pumps, a fan for ventilation, and a control room. The generator, emergency storage tank, and existing transformer would be located on a concrete pad that would surround the lift station structure. The emergency storage tank would have a capacity of approximately 40,000 gallons, or enough to provide at least two hours of storage. During normal operations, the lift station would be powered by the existing on-site transformer that currently powers the existing lift station. The backup generator would power the lift station in the instance of failure of the transformer. Construction of the Project would require site preparation to clear existing vegetation, excavation for the below-grade wet well and dry well, light grading for the site area surrounding the lift station and for the expanded access road, construction of the lift station structure and site area pad, installation and connection of facilities, paving, and demolition of existing structures. Construction is expected to last approximately one year and would occur between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. in accordance with the County of San Diego Municipal Code. Excavation is currently estimated to result in 1,500 cubic yards (CY) of export, which would be either taken by the adjacent golf course property or transported to an existing legal disposal site. Construction staging would occur either within the Project site or within adjacent disturbed areas of the abandoned golf course. Once construction activities are complete, activities on site would be limited to routine maintenance of facilities, consistent with the requirements of the current lift station. The diesel-powered backup generator would run a maximum of 50 hours annually for maintenance and testing purposes, and then when normal power supply is lost. NOISE TERMINOLOGY AND METRICS All noise level or sound level values presented herein are expressed in terms of decibels (dB), with A-weighting (dBA) to approximate the hearing sensitivity of humans. Time-averaged noise levels are expressed by the symbol LEQ, with a specified duration. The Community Noise Equivalent Level (CNEL) is a 24-hour average, where noise levels during the evening hours of 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. have an added 5 dBA weighting, and sound levels during the nighttime hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. have an added 10 dBA weighting. This is similar to the Day Night sound level (LDN), which is a 24-hour average with an added 10 dBA weighting on the same nighttime hours but no added weighting on the evening hours. Sound levels expressed in CNEL are always based on dBA. These metrics are used to express noise levels for both measurement and municipal regulations, as well as for land use guidelines and enforcement of noise ordinances. Sound can be described as the mechanical energy of a vibrating object transmitted by pressure waves through a liquid or gaseous medium (e.g., air) to a hearing organ, such as a human ear. Noise is defined as loud, unexpected, or annoying sound. In the science of acoustics, the fundamental model consists of a sound (or noise) source, a receiver, and the propagation path between the two. The loudness of the noise source and obstructions or Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 3 of 17 April 8, 2021 atmospheric factors affecting the propagation path to the receiver contribute to the sound level and characteristics of the noise perceived by the receiver. The field of acoustics deals primarily with the propagation and control of sound. Continuous sound can be described by frequency (pitch) and amplitude (loudness). A low frequency sound is perceived as low in pitch. Frequency is expressed in terms of cycles per second, or Hertz (Hz) (e.g., a frequency of 250 cycles per second is referred to as 250 Hz). High frequencies are sometimes more conveniently expressed in kilohertz (kHz), or thousands of Hertz. The audible frequency range for humans is generally between 20 Hz and 20,000 Hz. The amplitude of pressure waves generated by a sound source determines the loudness of that source. A logarithmic scale is used to describe sound pressure level (SPL) in terms of dBA units. The threshold of hearing for the human ear is approximately 0 dBA, which corresponds to 20 micro Pascals (mPa). Because decibels are logarithmic units, SPL cannot be added or subtracted through ordinary arithmetic. Under the decibel scale, a doubling of sound energy corresponds to a 3 dBA increase. In other words, when two identical sources are each producing sound of the same loudness, the resulting sound level at a given distance would be 3 dBA higher than one source under the same conditions. REGULATORY FRAMEWORK County of San Diego General Plan Noise Element The Noise Element of the County General Plan includes guidelines for noise compatibility and establishes limitations on sound levels to be received by noise sensitive land uses (NSLUs; Tables N-1 and N-2 from the County General Plan), as detailed below in Table 1, County of San Diego Noise Compatibility Guidelines, and noise standards, as detailed in Table 2, County of San Diego General Plan Noise Standards. New development may cause an existing NSLU to be affected by noise caused by the new development, or it may locate a NSLU in such a place that it is affected by noise. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 4 of 17 April 8, 2021 Table 1 COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO NOISE COMPATIBILITY GUIDELINES Land Use Category 55* 60* 65* 70* 75* 80* A Residential—single family residences, mobile homes, senior housing, convalescent homes B Residential—multi-family residences, mixed-use (commercial/residential) C Transient lodging—motels, hotels, resorts D(1) Schools, churches, hospitals, nursing homes, child care facilities E(1) Passive recreational parks, nature preserves, contemplative spaces, cemeteries F(1) Active parks, golf courses, athletic fields, outdoor spectator sports, water recreation G(1) Office/professional, government, medical/dental, commercial, retail, laboratories H(1) Industrial, manufacturing, utilities, agriculture, mining, stables, ranching, warehouse, maintenance/repair ACCEPTABLE—Specified land use is satisfactory, based upon the assumption that any buildings involved are of normal construction, without any special noise insulation requirements. CONDITIONALLY ACCEPTABLE—New construction or development should be undertaken only after a detailed noise analysis is conducted to determine if noise reduction measures are necessary to achieve acceptable levels for land use. Criteria for determining exterior and interior noise levels are listed in Table 3, Noise Standards. If a project cannot mitigate noise to a level deemed Acceptable, the appropriate County decision-maker must determine that mitigation has been provided to the greatest extent practicable or that extraordinary circumstances exist. UNACCEPTABLE—New construction or development shall not be undertaken. Source: County 2011 (1) Denotes facilities used for part of the day; therefore, an hourly standard would be used rather than CNEL Note: For projects located within an Airport Influence Area of an adopted Airport Land Use Compatibility Plan (ALUCP), additional Noise Compatibility Criteria restrictions may apply as specified in the ALUCP. * Exterior Noise Level (CNEL) Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 5 of 17 April 8, 2021 Table 2 COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO GENERAL PLAN NOISE STANDARDS 1. The exterior noise level (as defined in Item 3) standard for Category A shall be 60 CNEL, and the interior noise level standard for indoor habitable rooms shall be 45 CNEL. 2. The exterior noise level standard for Categories B and C shall be 65 CNEL, and the interior noise level standard for indoor habitable rooms shall be 45 CNEL. 3. The exterior noise level standard for Categories D and G shall be 65 CNEL and the interior noise level standard shall be 50 dBA LEQ (one hour average). 4. For single-family detached dwelling units, “exterior noise level” is defined as the noise level measured at an outdoor living area which adjoins and is on the same lot as the dwelling, and which contains at least the following minimum net lot area: (i) for lots less than 4,000 square feet in area, the exterior area shall include 400 square feet, (ii) for lots between 4,000 square feet to 10 acres in area, the exterior area shall include 10 percent of the lot area; (iii) for lots over 10 acres in area, the exterior area shall include 1 acre. 5. For all other residential land uses, “exterior noise level” is defined as noise measured at exterior areas that are provided for private or group usable open space purposes. “Private Usable Open Space” is defined as usable open space intended for use of occupants of one dwelling unit, normally including yards, decks, and balconies. When the noise limit for Private Usable Open Space cannot be met, then a Group Usable Open Space that meets the exterior noise level standard shall be provided. “Group Usable Open Space” is defined as usable open space intended for common use by occupants of a development, either privately owned and maintained or dedicated to a public agency, normally including swimming pools, recreation courts, patios, open landscaped areas, and greenbelts with pedestrian walkways and equestrian and bicycle trails, but not including off-street parking and loading areas or driveways. 6. For non-residential noise sensitive land uses, exterior noise level is defined as noise measured at the exterior area provided for public use. 7. For noise sensitive land uses where people normally do not sleep at night, the exterior and interior noise standard may be measured using either CNEL or the one-hour average noise level determined at the loudest hour during the period when the facility is normally occupied. 8. The exterior noise standard does not apply for land uses where no exterior use area is proposed or necessary, such as a library. 9. For Categories E and F, the exterior noise level standard shall not exceed the limit defined as “Acceptable” in Table N-1 or an equivalent one-hour noise standard. Source: County 2011 Note: Exterior Noise Level compatibility guidelines County of San Diego Code of Regulatory Ordinances – Noise Ordinance Sections 36.401 through 36.423 of the County of San Diego Code of Regulatory Ordinances discuss further County noise requirements. The purpose of the Noise Ordinance is to regulate noise in the unincorporated area of the County to promote the public health, comfort, and convenience of the County’s inhabitants and its visitors. Section 36.404, General Sound Level Limits The Noise Ordinance sets limits pertaining to the generation of exterior noise, as follows: (a) It is unlawful for any person to cause or allow the creation of any noise to the extent that the one-hour average sound level at any point on or beyond the boundaries of the property will exceed the applicable limits in Table 3, County of San Diego Code of Regulatory Ordinances Exterior Sound Level Limits. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 6 of 17 April 8, 2021 Table 3 COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO CODE OF REGULATORY ORDINANCES EXTERIOR SOUND LEVEL LIMITS Zone Time One-Hour Average Sound Level Limits (dBA) (1) R-S, R-D, R-R, R-MH, A-70, A-72, S-80, S-81, S-87, S-90, S-92 and R-V and R-U with a density of less than 11 dwelling units per acre. 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. 50 45 (2) R-RO, R-C, R-M, S-86, V5 and R-V and R-U with a density of 11 or more dwelling units per acre. 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. 55 50 (3) S-94, V4 and all other commercial zones. 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. 60 55 (4) V1, V2 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 60 V1, V2 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 55 V1 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. 55 V2 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. 50 V3 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. 70 65 (5) M-50, M-52 and M-54 Anytime 70 (6) S-82, M-56 and M-58 Anytime 75 (7) S-88 (see subsection (c) below) - - Source: County of San Diego Code of Regulatory Ordinances Section 36.404. Zoning Code Definitions: R-S = Single-Family Residential; R-D = Duplex Residential; R-R = Rural Residential; R-MH = Mobile home Residential; A-70 = Limited Agriculture; A-72 = General Agriculture; S-80 = Open Space; S-90 = Holding Area; S-92 = General Rural; S-94 = Transportation and Utility Corridor; R-V = Variable-Family Residential; R-RO = ; R-C = Residential-Commercial; R-M = Multi-Family Residential ; S-86 = Parking; R-U = Urban Residential; V1, V2, V3, V4, and V5 = Village Designations; M-50 = Basic Industrial; M-52 = Limited Industrial; M-54 = General Impact Industrial; S-82 = Extractive Use; M-56 = Mixed Industrial; M-58 = High-Impact Industrial; S-88 = Specific Plan (b) Where a noise study has been conducted and the noise mitigation measures recommended by that study have been made conditions of approval of a Major Use Permit, which authorizes the noise-generating use or activity and the decision making body approving the Major Use Permit determined that those mitigation measures reduce potential noise impacts to a level below significance, implementation and compliance with those noise mitigation measures shall constitute compliance with subsection (a) above. (c) S-88 zones are Specific Planning Areas that allow for different uses. The sound level limits in Table 1 that apply in an S-88 zone depend on the use being made of the property. The limits in Table 3, subsection (1) apply to property with a residential, agricultural, or civic use. The limits in subsection (5) apply to property with an industrial use that would only be allowed in an M-50, M-52, or M-54 zone. The limits in subsection (6) apply to all property with an extractive use or a use that would only be allowed in an M-56 or M-58 zone. (d) If the measured ambient level exceeds the applicable limit noted above, the allowable one-hour average sound level shall be the ambient noise level, plus 3 dB. The ambient noise level shall be measured when the alleged noise violation source is not operating. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 7 of 17 April 8, 2021 (e) The sound level limit at a location on a boundary between two zones is the arithmetic mean of the respective limits for the two zones; provided however, that the one-hour average sound level limit applicable to extractive industries, including but not limited to borrow pits and mines, shall be 75 dB at the property line regardless of the zone which the extractive industry is actually located. (f) A fixed-location public utility distribution or transmission facility located on or adjacent to a property line shall be subject to the sound level limits of this section, measured at or beyond six feet from the boundary of the easement upon which the facility is located. Section 36,408, Hours of Operation of Construction Equipment Except for emergency work, it shall be unlawful for any person to operate or cause to be operated, construction equipment: a. Between the hours of 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. b. On a Sunday or a holiday. For the purposes of this section a holiday means January 1, the last Monday in May, July 4, the first Monday in September, December 25, and any day appointed by the President as a special national holiday or the Governor of the State as a special State holiday. A person may, however, operate construction equipment on a Sunday or holiday between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the person’s residence or for the purpose of constructing a residence for himself or herself, provided that the operation of construction equipment is not carried out for financial consideration or other consideration of any kind and does not violate the limitations in Sections 36.409 and 36.410. Section 36.409, Construction Noise Except for emergency work, it shall be unlawful for any person to operate construction equipment or cause construction equipment to be operated, that exceeds an average sound level of 75 dB for an 8-hour period, between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m., when measured at the boundary line of the property where the noise source is located or on any occupied property where the noise is being received. Section Impulsive Noise Section 36.410 provides additional limitation on construction equipment beyond Section 36.404 pertaining to impulsive noise. Except for emergency work or work on a public road project, no person shall produce or cause to be produced an impulsive noise that exceeds the maximum sound level shown in Table 4, County of San Diego Maximum Sound Levels (Impulsive), when measured at the boundary line of the property where the noise source is located or on any occupied property where the noise is received, for 25 percent of the minutes in the measurement period. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 8 of 17 April 8, 2021 Table 4 COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO MAXIMUM SOUND LEVELS (IMPULSIVE) Occupied Property Use Decibels (dBA) LMAX Residential, village zoning or civic use 82 Agricultural, commercial or industrial use 85 Source: County of San Diego Municipal Code Section 36.410 dBA = A-weighted decibel; LMAX = maximum noise level The minimum measurement period for any measurements is one hour. During the measurement period, a measurement must be conducted every minute from a fixed location on an occupied property. The measurements must measure the maximum sound level during each minute of the measurement period. If the sound level caused by construction equipment or the producer of the impulsive noise exceeds the maximum sound level for any portion of any minute, it will be deemed that the maximum sound level was exceeded during that minute. EXISTING CONDITIONS Surrounding Land Uses The Project site and land to the north and west include a decommissioned golf course and have a land use designation of Open Space (Recreation). Land to the east and southeast is developed with single-family residences and has a land use designation of Semi-Rural Residential. Land to the southwest includes open space and recreational hiking trails within the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge and has a land use designation of Public Agency Lands. Refer to Figure 2 for locations of land uses in proximity to the Project site. The Project site and land to the north, south, and west is zoned S-88 (Specific Plan) and land to the east is zoned A-70 (Limited Agriculture). Existing Noise Sensitive Land Uses NSLUs are land uses that may be subject to stress and/or interference from excessive noise and generally include residences, hospitals, schools, hotels, resorts, libraries, sensitive wildlife habitat, or similar facilities where quiet is an important attribute of the environment. Existing NSLUs in the vicinity of the Project site include single-family residential properties immediately east of the Project site. Existing Noise Setting An ambient noise survey was conducted at the Project site on March 19, 2021 to document the existing noise setting of the area. The survey included two 15-minute noise measurements, one adjacent to the existing lift station and one further south along the access road. The measured noise levels are shown in Table 5, Ambient Noise Measurement Survey Results, and the measurement locations are depicted on Figure 2. The primary noise source in the vicinity of the Project site is vehicular traffic along Willow Glen Drive. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 9 of 17 April 8, 2021 Table 5 AMBIENT NOISE MEASUREMENT SURVEY RESULTS Measurement Location Time Noise Level (dBA LEQ) M1 Adjacent to the existing lift station 1:10 p.m. – 1:25 p.m. 50.4 M2 Along the access road 1:27 p.m. – 1:41 p.m.* 48.9 * Measurement M2 was concluded after 14 minutes instead of 15 minutes because a nearby dog starting barking. ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY Noise Measurement Equipment The following equipment was used to measure existing noise levels at the Project site: • Larson Davis System LxT Integrating Sound Level Meter • Larson Davis Model CAL150 Calibrator • Windscreen and tripod for the sound level meter On-site noise levels were recorded using a sound level meter conforming to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) specifications for sound level meters, ANSI SI.4-1983 (R2006). The meter was field-calibrated immediately prior to the noise measurement to ensure accuracy, with all instruments maintained with National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable calibration, per the manufacturers’ standards. Noise Modeling Software Modeling of the exterior noise environment for this report was accomplished using two computer noise models: Computer Aided Noise Abatement (CadnaA) version 2019 and Traffic Noise Model (TNM) version 2.5. CadnaA is a model-based computer program developed by DataKustik for predicting noise impacts in a wide variety of conditions. CadnaA assists in the calculation, presentation, assessment, and mitigation of noise exposure. It allows for the input of project related information, such as noise source data, barriers, structures, and topography to create a detailed CadnaA model, and uses the most up-to- date calculation standards to predict outdoor noise impacts. CadnaA traffic noise prediction is based on the data and methodology used in the TNM. TNM was released in February 2004 by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) and calculates the daytime average hourly LEQ from three-dimensional model inputs and traffic data (California Department of Transportation [Caltrans] 2004). TNM was developed from Computer Aided Design (CAD) plans provided by the Project applicant. Input variables included road alignment, elevation, lane configuration, area topography, existing and planned noise control features, projected traffic volumes, estimated truck composition percentages, and vehicle speeds. Project construction noise was also analyzed using the Roadway Construction Noise Model (RCNM; USDOT 2008), which utilizes estimates of sound levels from standard construction equipment. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 10 of 17 April 8, 2021 IMPACT SIGNIFICANCE CRITERIA Based on Appendix G of the CEQA Guidelines, implementation of the Project would result in a significant adverse impact if it would: Threshold 1: Result in generation of a substantial temporary or permanent increase in ambient noise levels in the vicinity of the project in excess of standards established in the local general plan or noise ordinance, or applicable standards of other agencies. Impacts related to a temporary or periodic increase in ambient noise levels due to construction would be considered significant if noise from construction activity exceeds 75 dBA for an eight-hour period between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. at the adjacent residential properties; if impulsive noise exceeds 82 dBA LMAX at the adjacent residential properties; or if noise is generated between the hours of 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. on weekdays, or any time on a Sundays or holidays, in accordance with the County of San Diego Noise Ordinance. Impacts related to a permanent increase in ambient noise levels would be considered significant if operation of the Project would result in one-hour average noise levels in excess of applicable property line noise limits specified in the County of San Diego Noise Ordinance (refer to Table 3). Properties to the east are zoned A-70 and include single-family residential uses. The applicable noise level limits are 50 dBA during the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. or 45 dBA during the hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. Properties to the north and west are zoned S-88. According to Section 36.404(c) of the County of San Diego Noise Ordinance, the applicable property line noise limits for the S88 zone depends on the use being made of the property. The property to the north and west of the Project site currently includes a decommissioned golf course; however, it has a land use designation of Open Space (Recreation) and will likely be used as such in the future. The noise limits for open space (S-80) in Table 3 are 50 dBA during the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and 45 dBA during the hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. Therefore, for this analysis, noise levels limits of 50 dBA during the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and 45 dBA during the hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. are used at the Project’s eastern, northern, and western property lines. The southern Project site property line (at the base of the access road) is located away from where the noise-generating equipment would be and is therefore not considered herein. Threshold 2: Result in generation of excessive ground-borne vibration or ground-borne noise levels. Impacts would be significant if construction or operation of the Project would result in the exposure of persons to ground-borne vibration equal to or in excess of Caltrans’ (2020) “strongly perceptible” human response threshold of 0.1 inch per second (in/sec) peak particle velocity (PPV) for steady state sources. Threshold 3: For a project located within the vicinity of a private airstrip or an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, expose people residing or working in the project area to excessive noise levels. Excessive aircraft-related noise could occur if the project is located within the vicinity of a private airstrip, within an airport land use plan, or within two miles of a public airport or public use airport. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 11 of 17 April 8, 2021 IMPACT ANALYSIS Issue 1: Excessive Noise Levels Would the Project result in generation of a substantial temporary or permanent increase in ambient noise levels in the vicinity of the Project in excess of standards established in the local general plan or noise ordinance, or applicable standards of other agencies? Construction Noise On-site Construction Activities The Project’s expected on-site construction activities can be grouped into three main components: (1) access road improvements; (2) construction of the new lift station; and (3) demolition of the existing lift station structures. Construction would generate elevated noise levels that could be audible to the residential NSLUs to the east of the Project site. The magnitude of the impact would depend on the type of construction activity, equipment used, duration of each construction phase, distance between the noise source and receiver(s), and any intervening structures. Construction equipment would not all operate at the same time or location. Furthermore, construction equipment would not be in constant use during the 8-hour operating day. Access Road Improvements Work for the access road improvements would involve site preparation (vegetation clearing), light grading, and paving, and would occur at an approximate average distance of 30 feet from the residential property line to the east. Site preparation and light grading are anticipated to be accomplished using a single skid steer. Paving would be accomplished using a roller and a paver, which would be used consecutively, not simultaneously, and would therefore not combine to generate elevated noise levels. At 30 feet, a skid steer is estimated to generate a noise level of 75.5 dBA LEQ, a roller 77.4 dBA LEQ, and a paver 78.6 dBA LEQ, all of which exceed the 75-dBA LEQ limit; however, this is assuming that the equipment is operating at a stationary location and generating maximum noise levels at a single receptor location located 30 feet way. In actuality, these pieces of equipment would be mobile along the length of the approximately 270-foot-long access road and would not remain within 30 feet of a given receptor location over the course of a workday. As such, noise levels at a given receptor location from construction work along the access road are expected to be below the 75-dBA limit over the course of an 8-hour workday. Lift Station Construction Construction of the new lift station site would involve site preparation (vegetation clearing), excavation for the below-grade wet well and dry well, light grading, construction of the lift station structure and site area pad, installation and connection of facilities, and paving. Work for the lift station site construction would occur throughout the lift station site area (i.e., the portion of the Project site excluding the access road); therefore, for noise analysis purposes, construction equipment is modeled to be located at the center of the lift station site area, at an approximate distance of 50 feet from the closest residential property line to the east. This distance represents the assumed average distance to the property line that construction equipment would be operating at over the course of an 8-hour workday. The loudest Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 12 of 17 April 8, 2021 combination of pieces of equipment anticipated to be used simultaneously for each of these construction activities and the resultant noise levels at 50 feet are shown in Table 6, Lift Station Construction Noise Levels. Table 6 LIFT STATION CONSTRUCTION NOISE LEVELS Activity Simultaneous Equipment Noise Level at 50 feet (dBA LEQ) Exceed 75 dBA Limit? Site Preparation Skid steer 71.0 No Excavation Excavator and dump truck 78.1 Yes Backhoe and dump truck 76.1 Yes Light Grading Skid steer 71.0 No Structure Construction Concrete pump truck and concrete mixer truck 77.6 Yes Backhoe and dump truck 76.1 Yes Crane and delivery truck 75.6 Yes Crane and welder 74.5 No Facilities Installation Crane and welder 74.5 No Paving Roller 73.0 No Paver 74.2 No Source: RCNM (USDOT 2008) As shown in Table 6, excavation and structure construction are estimated to result in noise levels in excess of the 75-dBA LEQ limit; therefore, the Project’s temporary construction noise impacts are considered potentially significant. Mitigation measure NOI-1, provided below, would be required to reduce impacts to a less-than-significant level. Existing Lift Station Demolition Demolition of the existing concrete block lift station structure would be required and would occur at an approximate average distance of 30 feet from the residential property line to the east. Initial demolition is expected to be accomplished using either a concrete saw or a breaker. At 30 feet, a concrete saw is estimated to generate a noise level of 87.0 dBA LEQ and a breaker is estimated to generate a noise level of 87.7 dBA LEQ. Excavated materials would then likely be loaded into a dump truck using a loader. A loader and dump truck operating simultaneously are estimated to generate a combined noise level of 81.5 dBA LEQ at 30 feet. These demolition activities have the potential to result in noise levels in excess of the 75-dBA LEQ limit; therefore, the Project’s temporary construction noise impacts are considered potentially significant. Mitigation measure NOI-1 would be required to reduce impacts to a less-than- significant level. NOI-1 Construction Noise Management Plan. Noise from Project construction activities shall comply with the limits and hours specified in the County of San Diego Noise Ordinance. Construction shall not occur outside the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Construction noise shall not exceed 75 dBA LEQ (8-hour) at nearby residential land uses. Appropriate measures shall be implemented to reduce construction noise, including, but not limited to, the following: Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 13 of 17 April 8, 2021 • Construction equipment shall be properly outfitted and maintained with manufacturer- recommended noise-reduction devices. • Diesel equipment shall be operated with closed engine doors and equipped with factory-recommended mufflers. • Mobile or fixed “package” equipment (e.g., arc-welders and air compressors) shall be equipped with shrouds and noise control features that are readily available for that type of equipment. • Electrically powered equipment shall be used instead of pneumatic or internal combustion powered equipment, where feasible. • Unnecessary idling of internal combustion engines (e.g., in excess of 5 minutes) shall be prohibited. • The use of noise-producing signals, including horns, whistles, alarms, and bells, shall be for safety warning purposes only. • No Project-related public address or music system shall be audible at any adjacent sensitive receptor. • Any truck or equipment equipped with back-up alarm moving within 300 feet of a NSLU should have the normal back-up alarm disengaged and safety provided by lights and flagman or broad-spectrum noise backup alarm (as appropriate for conditions) used in compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration safety guidelines. • Temporary sound barriers or sound blankets shall be installed between construction operations and adjacent NSLUs. The Project Contractor shall construct a temporary noise barrier of a height breaking the line of sight between the equipment and nearby receptors and meeting the specifications listed below (or of a Sound Transmission Class [STC] 19 rating or better) to attenuate noise. • If a temporary barrier is used, all barriers shall be solid and constructed of wood, plastic, fiberglass, steel, masonry, or a combination of those materials, with no cracks or gaps through or below the wall. Any seams or cracks must be filled or caulked. If wood is used, it can be tongue and groove or close butted seams and must be at least 3/4-inch thick or have a surface density of at least 3.5 pounds per square-foot. Sheet metal of 18-gauge (minimum) may be used if it meets the other criteria and is properly supported and stiffened so that it does not rattle or create noise itself from vibration or wind. Noise blankets, hoods, or covers also may be used, provided they are appropriately implemented to provide the required sound attenuation. • Residents within 200 feet of the Project’s disturbance area shall be notified in writing within one week of any construction activity. The notification shall describe the activities anticipated, provide dates and hours, and provide contact information with a description of a complaint and response procedure. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 14 of 17 April 8, 2021 • The on-site construction supervisor shall have the responsibility and authority to receive and resolve noise complaints. A clear appeal process for the affected resident shall be established prior to construction commencement to allow for resolution of noise problems that cannot be immediately solved by the site supervisor. Implementation of mitigation measure NOI-1 would allow the Project’s construction noise levels to not exceed thresholds. Impacts would be less than significant. Off-site Construction Activities The Project would result in approximately 1,500 CY of excavated material that would either be taken by the adjacent golf course or taken to an off-site disposal location. If taken off site, the export of material would be accomplished via approximately 100 haul trucks, assuming a single truck hauls 15 CY of material. Each haul truck would make one trip to the Project site to pick up the material and another trip from the Project site to transport the material, resulting in a total of 200 haul truck trips. These trips are anticipated to occur over the course of 10 workdays, for a total of 20 haul truck trips per day, or 2.5 trips per hour over the course of an 8-hour workday. The haul trucks would generate noise that may be audible to residential NSLUs along Par 4 Drive. TNM software was used to calculate noise levels at residences from the haul trucks traveling along Par 4 Drive. For modeling purposes, 3 trucks per hour was assumed (rounded up from the 2.5 trucks per hour discussed above). The closest residential exterior use areas are located approximately 30 feet from the center of Par 4 Drive. At a distance of 30 feet, 3 trucks per hour traveling at a speed of 25 miles per hour would generate a noise level of 52.6 dBA LEQ. This would be well below the 75-dBA LEQ limit for construction noise, and associated impacts would be less than significant. Operational Noise Operation of the proposed lift station would include equipment that would generate elevated noise levels. The two primary operational noise-generating components of the Project would be (1) the lift station pump motors and ventilation system, and (2) the diesel backup generator. Design plans are not available at this stage in the planning process to provide specific equipment location information or equipment noise data; therefore, assumptions based on typical lift station design and standard lift station equipment are used herein for this analysis. The two 40-HP pump motors would be located within the lift station structure and are expected to generate interior noise levels ranging from 75 to 90 dBA. The structure would include a vent for air ventilation, and the pump motor noise would transfer from the interior to the exterior of the structure through the vent. Additional noise would occur from the ventilation fan near the vent opening. While dependent on the specific type of equipment and size of the vent, exterior noise levels are expected to be up to approximately 80 dBA at 10 feet for standard equipment of this size. Based on this noise level, the vent noise levels could be above 50 dBA within 300 feet and above 45 dBA within 550 feet. Since the Project’s lift station vent would be located within these distances to the property line(s), noise levels would have the potential to exceed the applicable 50-dBA LEQ daytime and 45-dBA LEQ nighttime limits. Mitigation measure NOI-2 would be required to reduce impacts to a less-than-significant level. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 15 of 17 April 8, 2021 NOI-2 Lift Station Operation Noise Attenuation. Noise generated by operation of the lift station pumps and ventilation system shall comply with the 50-dBA limit during the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and the 45-dBA limit during the hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. at the Project site’s eastern, western, and northern property lines. To adequately reduce noise levels, noise attenuating equipment and/or acoustical shielding shall be incorporated into Project design. Such features may include, but not be limited to, acoustical louvers, in-line silencers, and/or noise walls. Prior to building plan approval, planning for the lift station noise sources shall be required to show noise compliance with the 50-dBA daytime limit and 45-dBA nighttime limit at the property lines. A final operational test shall be required with the pumps and ventilation system in operation to ensure noise levels are below the required standards. The Project would include a backup generator that would be used to power the lift station in the instance of normal power failure and would be tested regularly during daytime hours. A standard generator of the size anticipated to be required for the Project is estimated to generate a noise level of approximately 75 dBA at 23 feet. Based on this noise level, the generator noise levels could be above 50 dBA within 400 feet. Since the Project’s generator would be located within this distance to the property line(s), noise levels would have the potential to exceed the applicable 50-dBA LEQ daytime limit during regular generator testing. Mitigation measure NOI-3 would be required to reduce impacts to a less-than-significant level. NOI-3 Generator Noise Attenuation. Noise generated by the generator during regular testing shall comply with the 50-dBA limit at the Project site’s eastern, western, and northern property lines. To adequately reduce noise levels, noise attenuating equipment and/or acoustical shielding shall be incorporated into Project design. Such features may include, but not be limited to, noise walls, noise control enclosures, and/or noise absorbing paneling. Prior to building plan approval, planning for the generator shall be required to show noise compliance with the 50-dBA daytime limit at the property lines. A final operational test shall be required with the generator in operation to ensure noise levels are below the required standards. Issue 2: Excessive Vibration Would the Project result in generation of excessive ground-borne vibration or ground-borne noise levels? Construction Vibration A likely source of vibration during Project construction would be a vibratory roller, which would be used for soil compaction for the Project’s expanded access road and lift station area pad. A standard vibratory roller creates approximately 0.210 inch per second PPV at a distance of 25 feet (Caltrans 2020). Based on this metric, use of a vibratory roller within 50 feet would have the potential to exceed the “strongly perceptible” vibration annoyance potential criteria for human receptors of 0.1 inch per second PPV,1 as specified by Caltrans in its Transportation and Construction Vibration Guidance Manual (2020). There is potential for use of a vibratory roller to be required within 50 feet of off-site residences for development of the Project’s expanded access road, which could result in an exceedance of the “strongly perceptible” vibration annoyance potential criteria for the residence immediately east of the 1 Equipment PPV = Reference PPV * (25/D)n(in/sec), where Reference PPV is PPV at 25 feet, D is distance from equipment to the receptor in feet, and n= 1.1 (the value related to the attenuation rate through the ground); formula from Caltrans 2020. Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 16 of 17 April 8, 2021 Project’s access road. However, exposure of this adjacent off-site residences to vibration would be limited to very short durations. A vibratory roller moves at a speed of approximately two miles per hour, which equates to 176 feet per minute. As the residence adjacent to the access road is approximately 125 feet long, a vibratory roller would be adjacent to the residence for approximately 43 seconds during a single pass, which would not result in excessive or substantial exposure. Further, use of a vibratory roller for the access road would be temporary. Temporary use of the vibratory roller at the lift station site would occur at distances greater than 50 feet from the residence and would not result in excessive vibration. Other equipment used during project construction is expected to generate less ground-borne vibration than a vibratory roller. As such, the Project’s temporary construction vibration impacts would be less than significant. Operational Vibration The Project would not include components that would have the potential to generate perceptible vibration at adjacent properties. Issue 3: Aircraft Noise For a project located within the vicinity of a private airstrip or an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, would the Project expose people residing or working in the project area to excessive noise levels? The closest airport to the Project site is Gillespie Field, located approximately 6 miles to the northwest. There are no public or private airports within two miles of the Project site; therefore, the Proposed Project would not expose people residing or working to excessive aircraft noise, and impacts would be less than significant. CONCLUSIONS Through incorporation of the mitigation measures specified above, the Project’s impacts related to construction and operational noise generation would be less than significant. Sincerely, Hunter Stapp Charles Terry Noise Analyst Principal Specialist, Noise, Acoustics & Vibration Attachments: Figure 1: Regional Location Figure 2: Aerial Photograph Figure 3: Site Plan Attachment A: Noise Measurement Site Survey Sheets Letter to Ms. Coburn-Boyd Page 17 of 17 April 8, 2021 REFERENCES California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). 2020. Transportation and Construction Vibration Guidance Manual. April. 2004. California Department of Transportation, Traffic Noise Model (TNM). San Diego, County of. 2011. San Diego County General Plan Noise Element. U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT). 2008. Roadway Construction Noise Model (RCNM). 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The Draft MND/IS addresses the potential environmental effects of the construction and operation of the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project (Project). Responsible, Trustee, and Other Jurisdictional Agencies: OWD requests input from your agency as to the content of the environmental information that is germane to your agency’s statutory responsibilities in connection with the Project. Agencies may need to use the MND/IS prepared by OWD when considering permits or other approvals for the Project. Interested Organizations/Individuals: OWD requests your comments and concerns regarding the environmental issues associated with the Project. Project Title: Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project Project Location: The Project is located in the unincorporated community of Jamul in eastern San Diego County, 0.9 mile north of State Route (SR) 94 and 0.6 mile southeast of SR 54. The Project site extends north from the western terminus of Par 4 Drive, approximately 1,500 feet west of Steele Canyon Road, and is partially within an inactive area of the golf course associated with the Cottonwood Golf Club. Project Description: The Project involves the replacement of an existing sewer lift station with a new and expanded sewer lift station on the adjacent property and the expansion an existing access road that provides access to the lift station. The proposed lift station would have a capacity of between 500 and 600 gallons per minute (gpm) and would replace the existing 400-gpm lift station. The expanded capacity would be to serve anticipated development in the area. In addition to expanding lift station capacity, the Project would increase the overall property area to allow for storage and greater functionality. Potential Environmental Effects: In accordance with CEQA, the Draft MND/IS evaluates “direct physical changes… and reasonably foreseeable indirect physical changes in the environment which may be caused by the project.” The Draft MND/IS also evaluates whether any such changes that it identifies are individually or cumulatively significant, and presents feasible mitigation, as necessary. The Draft MND/IS identifies potentially significant effects related to biological resources, cultural resources, hazards and hazardous materials, noise, tribal cultural resources, and wildfire from Project implementation. Each of these impacts would be reduced to below a level of significance through the incorporation of mitigation measures presented in the Draft MND/IS. Public Review Period: OWD has issued this Notice of Intent to Adopt a Mitigated Negative Declaration and Notice of Public Hearing for public review and comment pursuant to California Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 15072. The comment period for the Draft MND/IS begins on September 1, 2021. Responses should be sent at the earliest possible date but no later than September 30, 2021. Electronic copies of the Draft MND/IS and appendices are available on OWD’s website: www.otaywater.gov. Hard copies of the Draft MND/IS and appendices are available for public review by appointment at the OWD office, location listed below. Please contact Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd at the e-mail address listed below to set up an appointment. Copies of the Draft MND/IS and appendices are also available for public review at the County of San Diego Public Library—Rancho San Diego Branch and El Cajon Branch. Responses and Comments: At this time, OWD is soliciting comments on the Draft MND/IS for this Project. All comments must be postmarked by September 30, 2021. Comments may be submitted by mail, fax, or email. All comments should indicate a contact person for each agency or organization, if applicable. Please send your responses to: Otay Water District 2554 Sweetwater Springs Boulevard Spring Valley, California 91978-2096 Attention: Lisa Coburn-Boyd Fax: 619-670-8920 lisa.coburn-boyd@otaywater.gov Following close of the public comment period, responses to comments received on the Draft MND/IS will be prepared, and, together with any corresponding revisions to the Draft MND/IS, will constitute a Final MND. Public Hearing: A public hearing to consider the adoption of the Final MND is scheduled as part of OWD’s Board meeting to be held on Wednesday, November 3, 2021, at 3:30 PM. This hearing will be available virtually and will be properly noticed on OWD’s website. The Final MND will be considered and acted upon by OWD’s Board of Directors at this hearing. PROOF of PUBLICATION STATE OF CALIFORNIA County of San Diego The Undersigned, declares under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California: That he/she is the resident of the County of San Diego. That he/she is and at all times herein mentioned was a citizen of the United States, over the age of twenty-one years, and that he/she is not a party to, nor interested in the above entitled matter; that he/she is Chief Clerk for the publisher of The San Diego Union-Tribune a newspaper of general circulation, printed and published daily in the City of San Diego, County of San Diego, and which newspaper is published for the dissemination of local news and intelligence of a general character, and which newspaper at all the times herein mentioned had and still has a bona fide subscription list of paying subscribers, and which newspaper has been established, printed and published at regular intervals in the said City of San Diego, County of San Diego, for a period exceeding one year next preceding the date of publication of the notice hereinafter referred to, and which newspaper is not devoted to nor published for the interests, entertainment or instruction of a particular class, profession, trade, calling, race, or denomination, or any number of same; that the notice of which the annexed is a printed copy, has been published in said newspaper in accordance with the instruction of the person(s) requesting publication, and not in any supplement thereof on the following dates, to wit: September 1, 2021 I certify under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing is true and correct. Dated in the City of San Diego, California on this 1st of September 2021 _________________________________ Cris Gaza San Diego Union-Tribune Legal Advertising Order ID: 7803183 Name: Otay Water District CA11495855 This space for filing stamp only OR#: O R A N G E C O U N T Y R E P O R T E R ~ SINCE 1921 ~ 600 W. Santa Ana Blvd., Suite 205, Santa Ana, California 92701-4542 Telephone (714) 543-2027 / Fax (714) 542-6841 PROOF OF PUBLICATION (2015.5 C.C.P.) State of California ) County of Orange ) ss Notice Type: Ad Description: I am a citizen of the United States and a resident of the State of California; I am over the age of eighteen years, and not a party to or interested in the above entitled matter. I am the principal clerk of the printer and publisher of the ORANGE COUNTY REPORTER, a newspaper published in the English language in the City of Santa Ana, and adjudged a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the laws of the State of California by the Superior Court of the County of Orange, State of California, under date of June 2, 1922, Case No. 13,421. That the notice, of which the annexed is a printed copy, has been published in each regular and entire issue of said newspaper and not in any supplement thereof on the following dates, to-wit: Executed on: 10/10/2004 At Los Angeles, California I certify (or declare) under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. Signature T H E D A I L Y T R A N S C R I P T 2652 4TH AVE 2ND FL, SAN DIEGO, CA 92103 (619) 232-3486 (619) 270-2503 SD 3506844 JOLENE FIELDING OTAY WATER DISTRICT 2554 SWEETWATER SPRINGS BLVD SPRING VALLEY, CA - 91978--209 HRG - NOTICE OF HEARING NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT A MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION AND NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING I am a citizen of the United States and a resident of the State of California; I am over the age of eighteen years, and not a party to or interested in the above entitled matter. I am the principal clerk of the printer and publisher of THE DAILY TRANSCRIPT, a newspaper published in the English language in the City of SAN DIEGO, County of SAN DIEGO and adjudged a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the laws of the State of California by the Superior Court of the County of SAN DIEGO, State of California, under date of 05/13/2003, Case No. GIC808715. That the notice, of which the annexed is a printed copy, has been published in each regular and entire issue of said newspaper and not in any supplement thereof on the following dates, to-wit: 09/01/2021 09/01/2021 SAN DIEGO !A000005816457! Email NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT A MITIGATED NEGATIVEDECLARATION AND NOTICE OF APUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Otay Water District (OWD)has prepared a Draft Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND)/Initial Study (IS)in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA)and State CEQA Guidelines. The Draft MND/ISaddresses the potential environmental effects of the construction and operation of the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project (Project). The Project is located in the unincorporated community of Jamul in eastern San Diego County,0.9 mile north of State Route (SR)94 and 0.6 mile southeast of SR 54.The Project site extends north from the western terminus of Par 4 Drive,approximately 1,500 feet west of Steele Canyon Road,and is partially within an inactive area of the golf course associated with the Cottonwood Golf Club.The Project involves the replacement of an existing sewer lift station with a new and expanded sewer lift station on the adjacent property and the expansion an existing access road that provides access to the liftstation.The proposed lift station would have a capacity of between 500 and 600 gallons per minute (gpm)and would replace the existing 400-gpm lift station.The expanded capacity would be to serve anticipated development in the area.In addition to expanding lift station capacity, the Project would increase the overall property area to allow for storage and greater functionality. The Draft MND/IS has been prepared to inform the public and decision-makers about the potential environmental effects of the proposed Project,and to solicit input on the proposed Project and related effects from applicable agencies, stakeholders,and other interested parties. The Draft MND/IS identifies potentially significant effects related to biological resources,cultural resources,hazards and hazardous materials,noise,tribal cultural resources,and wildfire from Project implementation.Each of these impacts would be reduced to below a level of significance through the incorporation of mitigation measures presented in theDraft MND/IS. OWD has issued this notice for public review and comment pursuant to California Code of Regulations,Title 14, Section 15072.The comment period for the Draft MND/IS begins on September 1, 2021.All comments must be postmarked by September 30,2021.Comments may be submitted by mail,fax,or email.All comments should indicate a contact person for each agency or organization,if applicable.Please send your responses to Otay Water District,2554 Sweetwater Springs Boulevard,Spring Valley, California 91978-2096,Attention:Lisa Coburn-Boyd,Fax:619-670-8920,Email: lisa.coburn- boyd@otaywater.gov.Electronic copies of the Draft MND/IS and appendices are available on OWD's website: www.otaywater.gov.Hard copies of the Draft MND/IS and appendices are available for publicreview by appointment at the OWD office.Please contact Ms. Lisa Coburn-Boyd at the e-mail address listed above to set up an appointment. Copies of the Draft MND/IS and appendices are also available for public review at the County of San Diego Public Library—Rancho San Diego Branch and ElCajon Branch. Following close of the public comment period,responses to comments received on the Draft MND/IS will be prepared, and,together with any corresponding revisions to the Draft MND/IS,will constitute a Final MND. A public hearing to consider the adoption of the Final MND is scheduled as part of OWD’s Board meeting to be held on Wednesday,November 3,2021,at 3:30 PM.This hearing will be available virtually and will be properly noticed on OWD’s website.The Final MND will be considered and acted upon by OWD’s Board of Directors atthis hearing. 9/1/21 SD-3506844# Initial Study Appendix F Comment Letters and Responses This page intentionally left blank COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-1 A-1 A-2 A-1 This comment is introductory and notes that the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is a trustee agency for fish and wildlife resources and has the responsibility to provide biological expertise during the environmental review process. No response to this comment is necessary. A-2 This comment provides an overview of the Project objectives, Project location, and biological setting of the Project area. The information presented is consistent with that included in the Draft IS/MND. No response to this comment is necessary. COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-2 A-2 cont. A-3 A-3 This comment indicates that the Project’s proposed mitigation measures related to biological resources are not, but should be, consistent with the mitigation measures presented in Otay Water District’s (OWD’s) 2015 Water Facilities Master Plan Update Programmatic Environmental Impact Report (PEIR) in order to minimize impacts to sensitive biological resources. However, OWD’s 2015 Water Facilities Master Plan Update is for potable water and recycled water facilities; sewer facilities, such as the proposed Project, are not included in the 2015 Water Facilities Master Plan Update. The proposed Project is therefore not covered under the PEIR and is not subject to the mitigation measures contained therein. Additional details from the PEIR mitigation measures have, however, been incorporated into Project mitigation measures MM-BIO-1 and MM-BIO-2 in the Final IS/MND, as determined appropriate and necessary, to further minimize potential impacts to San Diego ambrosia and coastal California gnatcatcher. These modifications would not change the conclusion or impact significance determination in the IS/MND. Project mitigation measure MM-BIO-3 was not edited to include detail related to specific avoidance buffer distances, as the measure in the Draft IS/MND indicates that the appropriate buffer distance will COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-3 A-3 (cont.) be established by the biologist if active bird nests are confirmed to be present during the pre-construction survey, as buffer distances are species-specific. In response to this comment, mitigation measures MM-BIO-1 and MM-BIO-2 have been modified as follows (as indicated in strike-out/underline format to signify deletions and insertions): MM-BIO-1 Biological Construction Monitoring. Prior to vegetation clearing, grading, and/or construction activities, A a qualified biologist shall conduct a pre-construction environmental training session for construction personnel to inform them of the sensitive biological resources, including special-status species, in the local area and the avoidance measures in place to remain in compliance. The biologist shall periodically monitor construction activities to help ensure that Project activities occur within the approved Project limits and in compliance with required environmental conditions. The biologist shall also identify and flag San Diego ambrosia occurring within and/or near the Project work area for avoidance. The biologist shall oversee the installation of appropriate fencing and/or flagging to delineate the limits of construction and the construction staging area for protection of identified sensitive resources outside the construction areas. The fencing shall be checked weekly to ensure that fenced construction limits are not exceeded. The fencing shall be removed upon completion of construction activities. The construction staging area shall be located a minimum of 100 feet from the identified San Diego ambrosia individuals. Fueling of equipment shall occur in designated fueling zones within the construction staging areas. All equipment used within the approved construction limits shall be maintained to minimize and control fluid and grease leaks. Provisions to contain and clean up unintentional fuel, oil, fluid and grease leaks/spills shall be in place prior to construction. MM-BIO-2 Coastal California Gnatcatcher Pre-Construction Surveys and Noise Attenuation. The following Project requirements regarding the coastal California gnatcatcher shall be shown on the construction plans: COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-4 (cont.) No clearing, grubbing, grading, or other construction activities shall occur from February 15 to August 30, the breeding season of the coastal California gnatcatcher, until the following requirements have been met to the satisfaction of OWD: (A) Six (6) weeks prior to vegetation clearing, grading and/or construction activities that are scheduled to occur between February 15 and August 30, Aa qualified biologist (possessing a valid Federal Eendangered Sspecies Aact Section 10(a)(1)(A) Recovery Permit) shall commence focused surveys in accordance with USFWS protocols to determine the presence or absence of coastal California gnatcatcher. Documentation of the survey results shall be provided to OWD and USFWS within 45 days of completing the final survey, as required pursuant to Federal Endangered Species Act Section 10(a)(1)(A). If the survey results are negative, then no further mitigation for coastal California gnatcatcher is necessary and vegetation clearing can occur at any time in the year following the survey. If surveyed habitat is determined to be occupied by coastal California gnatcatcher, then the following measures shall be implemented: survey those suitable habitat areas that would be subject to construction noise levels exceeding 60 decibels (dBA) hourly average for the presence of coastal California gnatcatcher. A single pre-construction survey for the coastal California gnatcatcher shall be conducted within three days prior to the commencement of any construction. If gnatcatchers are present, then the following conditions must be met: (1) Coastal sage scrub/gnatcatcher habitat shall not be removed during the gnatcatcher breeding season (Beginning on February 15 and ending on through August 30). Work that has commenced prior to the breeding season shall be allowed to continue without interruption. If gnatcatchers move into an area within 500 feet of ongoing COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-5 (cont.) construction noise levels and attempt to nest, then it can be deduced that the noise is not great enough to discourage gnatcatcher nesting activities. If work begins prior to the breeding season, the contractor(s) should maintain continuous construction activities adjacent to coastal sage scrub that falls within 500 feet, until the work is completed. However, if clearing, grading and/or construction activities are scheduled to begin during the gnatcatcher breeding season, then updated focused surveys are necessary as defined above. In addition, if these activities are initiated prior to, and extend into, the breeding season, but they cease for any period of time and the contractor wishes to restart work within the breeding season window, then updated focused surveys are also necessary. If these surveys indicate no nesting birds occur within the coastal sage scrub that falls within 500 feet of the proposed work, then the adjacent construction activities shall be allowed to commence. However, if the birds are observed nesting within these areas, then the adjacent construction activities shall be postponed until all nesting has ceased., no clearing, grubbing, or grading of occupied gnatcatcher habitat shall be permitted. Areas restricted from such activities shall be staked or fenced under the supervision of a qualified biologist; and (2) Noise monitoring shall be conducted if construction activities are scheduled during the gnatcatcher breeding season; if the construction-related noise levels would exceed 60 dBA (i.e., the noise threshold suggested by USFWS for indirect impacts to gnatcatcher), or ambient noise level if it already exceeds 60 dBA; and if gnatcatchers are found within 500 feet of the noise source. Beginning on February 15 and ending on August 30, no construction activities shall occur within any portion of the site where construction activities COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-6 (cont.) would result in noise levels exceeding 60 dBA hourly average at the edge of occupied gnatcatcher habitat. An analysis showing that noise generated by construction activities would not exceed 60 dBA hourly average at the edge of occupied habitat must be completed by a qualified acoustician (possessing current noise engineer license of registration with monitoring noise level experience with listed animal species) and approved by OWD at least two weeks prior to the commencement of construction activities. Construction activities that generate noise levels over 60 dBA may be permitted within 300 feet of occupied habitat if methods are employed that reduce the noise levels to below 60 dBA at the boundary of occupied habitat (e.g., temporary noise attenuation barriers or use of alternative equipment). During construction activities, monitoring of noise levels shall be conducted by a noise monitor with the help of the biologist to ensure that a noise level of 60 dBA at the boundary of occupied habitat is not exceeded at least twice weekly on varying days, or more frequently depending on the construction activity. If the noise attenuation techniques implemented are determined to be inadequate by the qualified acoustician or biologist, then the associated construction activities shall cease until such time that adequate noise attenuation is achieved or until the end of the breeding season (August 16). Documentation of the noise monitoring results shall be provided to OWD and USFWS within 45 days of completing the final noise monitoring event. Given that chain link fencing currently separates the proposed Project from potential coastal California gnatcatcher habitat, no additional fencing is required. Prior to the commencement of construction activities during the breeding season, areas restricted from such COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-7 (activities shall be staked or fenced under the supervision of a qualified biologist; or (3) At least two weeks prior to the commencement of construction activities, under the direction of a qualified acoustician, noise attenuation measures (e.g., berms, walls) shall be implemented to ensure that noise levels resulting from construction activities will not exceed 60 dBA hourly average at the edge of habitat occupied by the coastal California gnatcatcher. Concurrent with the commencement of construction activities and the construction of necessary noise attenuation facilities, noise monitoring* shall be conducted at the edge of the occupied habitat area to ensure that noise levels do not exceed 60 dBA hourly average. *Construction noise monitoring shall continue to be monitored at least twice weekly on varying days, or more frequently depending on the construction activity, to verify that noise levels at the edge of occupied habitat are maintained below 60 dBA hourly average or to the ambient noise level if it already exceeds 60 dBA hourly average. If not, other measures shall be implemented in consultation with the biologist and OWD, as necessary, to reduce noise levels to below 60 dBA hourly average, or to the ambient noise level if it already exceeds 60 dBA hourly average. Such measures may include, but are not limited to, limitations on the placement of construction equipment and the simultaneous use of equipment. (B) If coastal California gnatcatcher are not detected during the pre-construction survey, the qualified biologist shall submit substantial evidence to OWD and applicable resource agencies, which demonstrates whether or not mitigation measure such as noise walls are necessary between February 15 and August 30 as follows: COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-8 A-3 cont. A-4 (cont.) are necessary between February 15 and August 30 as follows: (1) If this evidence indicated the potential is high for coastal California gnatcatcher to be present based on historical records or site conditions, then condition A(3)shall be adhered to as specified above. (2) If this evidence concludes that no impacts to this species are anticipated, no mitigation measures would be necessary. A-4 This comment opines that if the Project’s staging area occurs outside the identified direct impact footprint contained within the Project site boundaries, additional and undisclosed impacts to wildlife and other biological resources may occur. While the Project’s staging area may be located outside the identified direct impact footprint contained within the Project site boundaries, it would be located adjacent to the Project site and within the abandoned golf course. A 100-foot buffer around the Project site (considered the “study area”) was utilized in the Project’s biological assessment to include potential staging area locations. The land within the study area that overlaps with the adjacent golf course (i.e., land that may be used for the staging area) is considered disturbed habitat and no sensitive species or vegetation communities were determined to be present. Impacts related to potential foraging habitat and habitat linkage provided within the Project footprint (including the Project site and potential staging area locations) were included in the analysis in the Draft IS/MND. As stated in the Draft IS/MND, extensive raptor foraging habitat occurs off-site in the Project vicinity within undeveloped areas to the north of the Project. This is associated with the large area of the decommissioned golf course and associated trees. The COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-9 A-4 (cont.) relatively small Project footprint would result in negligible impacts to the north. Further, the staging area would be temporary. Similarly, as analyzed in the IS/MND the Project footprint does not represent, nor does it contribute to, a wildlife corridor, linkage, or wildlife nursery site based on the existing disturbed and developed nature of the Project footprint and surrounding areas, including residential development immediately to the east. Higher quality habitat that functions as a wildlife movement corridor occurs south of the Project footprint. The Project avoids, and is set back from, the habitat, with the closest Project elements separated from the habitat by existing barriers (i.e., fences). While there is potential for birds/raptors to use the Project site and/or potential staging area locations, MM-BIO-3 (which is applicable to both the Project site and staging area) would be implemented to avoid potential direct and indirect (from noise) impacts to birds/raptors. In addition, MM-BIO-1 has been revised in the Final IS/MND to require the staging area be a minimum of 100 feet from the identified San Diego ambrosia individuals located to the south of the Project site. These modifications would not change the conclusion or impact significance determination in the IS/MND. In response to this comment, mitigation measures MM-BIO-1 has been modified as shown in Response A-3, above. COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-10 A-5 A-6 A-7 A-5 This comment expresses concern related to impacts to wildlife from the Project’s potential use of lighting during construction and operations. As noted in this comment, lighting is not expected to be used during construction, as construction would occur during daylight hours. In addition, little to no lighting would be required for operation of the proposed facilities. If lighting is required during construction or operations, lighting would be low illumination, shielded, and directed downwards and away from adjacent habitat areas. This Project design detail has been specified in the Project description of the Final IS/MND. These modifications would not change the conclusion or impact significance determination in the IS/MND. In response to this comment, the Project description has been modified as follows (as indicated in strike-out/underline format to signify deletions and insertions): Construction of the Project would require site preparation to clear existing vegetation, excavation for the below-grade wet well and dry well, light grading for the site area surrounding the lift station and for the expanded access road, construction of the lift station structure and site area pad, installation and connection of facilities, paving, and demolition of existing structures. Construction is expected to last approximately one year and would occur between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. in accordance with the County of San Diego Municipal Code. Within this timeframe, construction is expected to occur during daylight hours and no construction lighting is anticipated to be used. Excavation is currently estimated to result in 1,500 cubic yards (CY) of export, which would be either taken by the adjacent golf course property or transported to an existing legal disposal site. Construction staging would occur either within the Project site or within adjacent disturbed areas of the abandoned golf course. Once construction activities are complete, activities on site would be limited to routine maintenance of facilities, consistent with the requirements of the current lift station. The diesel-powered backup COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-11 A-8 A-5 (cont.) generator would run a maximum of 50 hours annually for maintenance and testing purposes, and then when normal power supply is lost. Little to no lighting would be required for operation of the proposed facilities. If lighting is required, it would be low illumination, shielded, and directed downwards and away from adjacent habitat areas. A-6 This comment notes that, per the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), special status species and natural communities detected during Project surveys should be reported to the California Natural Diversity Database (CNDDB). Such resources will be reported, as appropriate. A-7 This comment mentions that because the Project would have an impact on fish and wildlife, a filing fee is necessary. OWD will pay the applicable CDFW fee upon filing of the Project’s Notice of Determination (NOD). A-8 The comment is conclusory. No response is necessary. COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-12 COMMENTS RESPONSES RTC-13 B-1 B-1 This comment indicates agreement with the cultural resources analysis and mitigation presented in the Draft IS/MND. No response is necessary. This page intentionally left blank Initial Study Appendix G Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program This page intentionally left blank Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 1 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project Mitigated Negative Declaration/Initial Study Environmental Checklist The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires the adoption of feasible mitigation measures to reduce the severity and magnitude of potentially significant environmental impacts associated with project development. To ensure that the mitigation measures identified in a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) are implemented, the public agency adopts a program for monitoring and reporting the measures it has imposed to mitigate or avoid significant effects [Section 15097 (a)]. The State CEQA Guidelines require that a mitigation monitoring and reporting program (MMRP) be adopted at the same time that the MND is adopted. According to Section 15097(c) of the State CEQA Guidelines, reporting generally consists of a written compliance review that is presented to the decision-making body or authorized staff person. A report may be required at various stages during project implementation or upon completion of the mitigation measure. Monitoring is generally an ongoing or periodic process of project oversight. This program identifies the party responsible for implementing the action, the timing for the implementation of each measure, and the procedure for documenting the mitigation efforts. Otay Water District (OWD) is responsible for the implementation and monitoring of the measures during design and construction of the Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project components unless otherwise stated herein. The organization of the MMRP follows the subsection formatting style presented within the MND and Initial Study Environmental Checklist. Only those subsections of the environmental issues presented in the Initial Study Environmental Checklist that have mitigation measures are provided below in the MMRP table. All other subsections do not contain mitigation measures. For each mitigation measure, the MMRP table identifies the following: (1) mitigation measure; (2) implementation action; (3) responsible agency/party; (4) monitoring schedule; and (5) verification date. OWD may impose requirements for implementation of the measures on other parties responsible for constructing project components that would require approval from OWD. OWD may modify how it will implement a mitigation measure, as long as the alternative means of implementing the mitigation still achieves the same or greater attenuation of the impact. Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 2 MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction Biological Resources MM-BIO-1: Biological Construction Monitoring. Prior to vegetation clearing, grading, and/or construction activities, a qualified biologist shall conduct a pre-construction environmental training session for construction personnel to inform them of the sensitive biological resources, including special-status species, in the local area and the avoidance measures in place to remain in compliance. The biologist shall also identify and flag San Diego ambrosia occurring within and/or near the Project work area for avoidance. The biologist shall oversee the installation of appropriate fencing and/or flagging to delineate the limits of construction and the construction staging area for protection of identified sensitive resources outside the construction areas. The fencing shall be checked weekly to ensure that fenced construction limits are not exceeded. The fencing shall be removed upon completion of construction activities. The construction staging area shall be located a minimum of 100 feet from the identified San Diego ambrosia individuals. Fueling of equipment shall occur in designated fueling zones within the construction staging areas. All equipment used within the approved construction limits shall be maintained to minimize and control fluid and grease leaks. Provisions to contain and clean up unintentional fuel, oil, fluid and grease leaks/spills shall be in place prior to construction. Pre-construction meeting; fencing/flagging; biological monitoring. OWD; Qualified Biologist X X MM-BIO-2: Coastal California Gnatcatcher Pre-Construction Surveys and Noise Attenuation. The following Project requirements regarding the coastal California gnatcatcher shall be shown on the construction plans: No clearing, grubbing, grading, or other construction activities shall occur from Pre-construction surveys; species avoidance; construction noise monitoring; construction noise attenuation. OWD; Qualified Biologist; Qualified Acoustician X X Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 3 Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction February 15 to August 30, the breeding season of the coastal California gnatcatcher, until the following requirements have been met to the satisfaction of OWD: (A) Six (6) weeks prior to vegetation clearing, grading and/or construction activities that are scheduled to occur between February 15 and August 30, a qualified biologist (possessing a valid Federal Endangered Species Act section 10(a)(1)(A) Recovery Permit) shall commence focused surveys in accordance with USFWS protocols to determine the presence or absence of coastal California gnatcatcher. Documentation of the survey results shall be provided to OWD and USFWS within 45 days of completing the final survey, as required pursuant to Federal Endangered Species Act Section 10(a)(1)(A). If the survey results are negative, then no further mitigation for coastal California gnatcatcher is necessary and vegetation clearing can occur at any time in the year following the survey. If surveyed habitat is determined to be occupied by coastal California gnatcatcher, then the following measures shall be implemented: (1) Coastal sage scrub/gnatcatcher habitat shall not be removed during the gnatcatcher breeding season (February 15 through August 30). Work that has commenced prior to the breeding season shall be allowed to continue without interruption. If gnatcatchers move into an area within 500 feet of ongoing construction noise levels and attempt to nest, then it can be deduced that the noise is not great enough to discourage gnatcatcher nesting activities. If work begins prior to the breeding season, the contractor(s) should maintain continuous construction Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 4 Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction activities adjacent to coastal sage scrub that falls within 500 feet, until the work is completed. However, if clearing, grading and/or construction activities are scheduled to begin during the gnatcatcher breeding season, then updated focused surveys are necessary as defined above. In addition, if these activities are initiated prior to, and extend into, the breeding season, but they cease for any period of time and the contractor wishes to restart work within the breeding season window, then updated focused surveys are also necessary. If these surveys indicate no nesting birds occur within the coastal sage scrub that falls within 500 feet of the proposed work, then the adjacent construction activities shall be allowed to commence. However, if the birds are observed nesting within these areas, then the adjacent construction activities shall be postponed until all nesting has ceased. (2) Noise monitoring shall be conducted if construction activities are scheduled during the gnatcatcher breeding season; if the construction-related noise levels would exceed 60 dBA (i.e., the noise threshold suggested by USFWS for indirect impacts to gnatcatcher), or ambient noise level if it already exceeds 60 dBA; and if gnatcatchers are found within 500 feet of the noise source. An analysis showing that noise generated by construction activities would not exceed 60 dBA hourly average at the edge of occupied habitat must be completed by a qualified acoustician (possessing current noise engineer license of registration with monitoring noise level experience with listed animal species) and approved by Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 5 Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction OWD at least two weeks prior to the commencement of construction activities. Construction activities that generate noise levels over 60 dBA may be permitted within 300 feet of occupied habitat if methods are employed that reduce the noise levels to below 60 dBA at the boundary of occupied habitat (e.g., temporary noise attenuation barriers or use of alternative equipment). During construction activities, monitoring of noise levels shall be conducted by a noise monitor with the help of the biologist to ensure that a noise level of 60 dBA at the boundary of occupied habitat is not exceeded at least twice weekly on varying days, or more frequently depending on the construction activity. If the noise attenuation techniques implemented are determined to be inadequate by the qualified acoustician or biologist, then the associated construction activities shall cease until such time that adequate noise attenuation is achieved or until the end of the breeding season (August 16). Documentation of the noise monitoring results shall be provided to OWD and USFWS within 45 days of completing the final noise monitoring event. Given that chain link fencing currently separates the proposed Project from potential coastal California gnatcatcher habitat, no additional fencing is required. MM-BIO-3: Nesting Bird Pre-Construction Surveys and Avoidance. Trimming, grubbing, and clearing of vegetation shall be avoided during the general avian breeding season (January 15 to July 15 for raptors; February 15 to August 31 for other avian species) to the extent feasible. If trimming, grubbing, or clearing of vegetation is Pre-construction surveys; species avoidance. OWD; Qualified Biologist X X Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 6 Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction proposed to occur during the general avian breeding season, a pre-construction survey shall be conducted by a qualified biologist no more than seven days prior to vegetation clearing to determine if active bird nests are present in the affected areas. If there are no nesting birds (includes nest building or other breeding/nesting behavior) within this area, trimming, grubbing, and clearing of vegetation shall be allowed to proceed. If active bird nests are confirmed to be present during the pre-construction survey, a buffer zone will be determined and established by the biologist. Construction activities shall avoid any active nests until a qualified biologist has verified that the young have fledged, or the nest has otherwise become inactive. Cultural Resources MM-CUL-1: Cultural Resources Monitoring. An archaeological and Native American monitoring program shall be implemented for the Project to ensure no inadvertent impacts occur to unknown subsurface cultural resources. The monitoring program shall include attendance by the archaeologist and a Kumeyaay Native American monitor at a preconstruction meeting with the construction contractor and the presence of archaeological and Native American monitors during initial ground-disturbing activities. Both archaeological and Native American monitors shall have the authority to temporarily halt or redirect grading and other ground-disturbing activity in the event that cultural resources are encountered. If significant cultural material is encountered, the monitors shall coordinate with OWD staff to develop and implement appropriate mitigation measures. If the excavations for the Project are determined to be within disturbed soils with little potential for intact subsurface cultural material to be present, archaeological monitoring would be reduced or ceased. The Native American monitor shall determine the extent of Cultural resources monitoring program. OWD; Archaeologist; Kumeyaay Native American Monitor; Construction Contractor X X Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 7 Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction their presence during soil-disturbing activities. If the Native American monitor determines that their presence is not warranted fulltime, their schedule shall be adjusted accordingly. MM-CUL-2: Procedure for Unanticipated Discovery of Human Remains. If human remains are encountered, Public Resources Code Section 5097.98 and California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 will be followed. If human remains are encountered no further disturbance shall occur until the County Coroner has made the necessary findings as to origin. Further, pursuant to California Public Resources Code Section 5097.98(b), remains shall be left in place and free from disturbance until a final decision as to the treatment and disposition has been made. If the County Coroner determines the remains to be Native American, the coroner shall contact the NAHC within 24 hours. Subsequently, the NAHC shall identify the person or persons it believes to be the “most likely descendant.” The most likely descendant shall then make recommendations and engage in consultations concerning the treatment of the remains as provided in Public Resources Code Section 5097.98. Proper assessment, treatment, and disposition of human remains. OWD; Construction Contractor; County Coroner X Hazards and Hazardous Materials MM-HAZ-1: Construction Fire Safety Plan. The following fire prevention strategies shall be implemented during Project construction: • Construction within areas of dense foliage during dry conditions shall be avoided, when feasible. • In cases where avoidance is not feasible, brush fire prevention and management practices shall be incorporated. Specifics of the brush management program shall be incorporated into Project construction documents. Implementation of fire prevention strategies. OWD; Construction Contractor X Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 8 Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction Noise MM-NOI-1: Construction Noise Management Plan. Noise from Project construction activities shall comply with the limits and hours specified in the County of San Diego Noise Ordinance. Construction shall not occur outside the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Construction noise shall not exceed 75 dBA LEQ (8-hour) at nearby residential land uses. Appropriate measures shall be implemented to reduce construction noise, including, but not limited to, the following: • Construction equipment shall be properly outfitted and maintained with manufacturer-recommended noise-reduction devices. • Diesel equipment shall be operated with closed engine doors and equipped with factory-recommended mufflers. • Mobile or fixed “package” equipment (e.g., arc‐welders and air compressors) shall be equipped with shrouds and noise control features that are readily available for that type of equipment. • Electrically powered equipment shall be used instead of pneumatic or internal combustion powered equipment, where feasible. • Unnecessary idling of internal combustion engines (e.g., in excess of 5 minutes) shall be prohibited. • The use of noise‐producing signals, including horns, whistles, alarms, and bells, shall be for safety warning purposes only. • No Project‐related public address or music system shall be audible at any adjacent sensitive receptor. • Any truck or equipment equipped with backup alarm moving within 300 feet of a NSLU should have the normal back-up alarm disengaged and safety provided by lights and flagman or broad-spectrum noise backup Construction noise limit compliance; implementation of construction noise reduction strategies. OWD; Construction Contractor X Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 9 Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction alarm (as appropriate for conditions) used in compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration safety guidelines. • Temporary sound barriers or sound blankets shall be installed between construction operations and adjacent NSLUs. The Project Contractor shall construct a temporary noise barrier of a height breaking the line of sight between the equipment and nearby receptors and meeting the specifications listed below (or of a Sound Transmission Class [STC] 19 rating or better) to attenuate noise. • If a temporary barrier is used, all barriers shall be solid and constructed of wood, plastic, fiberglass, steel, masonry, or a combination of those materials, with no cracks or gaps through or below the wall. Any seams or cracks must be filled or caulked. If wood is used, it can be tongue and groove or close butted seams and must be at least 3/4-inch thick or have a surface density of at least 3.5 pounds per square-foot. Sheet metal of 18-gauge (minimum) may be used if it meets the other criteria and is properly supported and stiffened so that it does not rattle or create noise itself from vibration or wind. Noise blankets, hoods, or covers also may be used, provided they are appropriately implemented to provide the required sound attenuation. • Residents within 200 feet of the Project’s disturbance area shall be notified in writing within one week of any construction activity. The notification shall describe the activities anticipated, provide dates and hours, and provide contact information with a description of a complaint and response procedure. • The on-site construction supervisor shall have the responsibility and authority to receive and resolve noise complaints. A clear appeal process for the affected resident shall be Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 10 Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction established prior to construction commencement to allow for resolution of noise problems that cannot be immediately solved by the site supervisor. MM-NOI-2: Lift Station Operation Noise Attenuation. Noise generated by operation of the lift station pumps and ventilation system shall comply with the 50-dBA limit during the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and the 45-dBA limit during the hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. at the Project site’s eastern, western, and northern property lines. To adequately reduce noise levels, noise attenuating equipment and/or acoustical shielding shall be incorporated into Project design. Such features may include, but not be limited to, acoustical louvers, in-line silencers, and/or noise walls. Prior to building plan approval, planning for the lift station noise sources shall be required to show noise compliance with the 50-dBA daytime limit and 45-dBA nighttime limit at the property lines. A final operational test shall be required with the pumps and ventilation system in operation to ensure noise levels are below the required standards. Design of lift station for operational noise limit compliance. OWD X X MM-NOI-3: Generator Noise Attenuation. Noise generated by the generator during regular testing shall comply with the 50-dBA limit at the Project site’s eastern, western, and northern property lines. To adequately reduce noise levels, noise attenuating equipment and/or acoustical shielding shall be incorporated into Project design. Such features may include, but not be limited to, noise walls, noise control enclosures, and/or noise absorbing paneling. Prior to building plan approval, planning for the generator shall be required to show noise compliance with the 50-dBA daytime limit at the property lines. A final operational test shall be required with the generator in operation to ensure noise levels are below the required standards. Design of generator for operational noise limit compliance. OWD X X Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 11 Mitigation Measure Monitoring and Reporting Process Responsibility Monitoring Schedule Verification Date Before Construction During Construction After Construction Tribal Cultural Resources MM-CUL-1: Cultural Resources Monitoring. (see above under Cultural Resources) Wildfire MM-HAZ-1: Construction Fire Safety Plan. (see above under Hazards and Hazardous Materials) Cottonwood Sewer Lift Station Replacement Project | October 2021 Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 12                             This page intentionally left blank  STAFF REPORT TYPE MEETING: Regular Board MEETING DATE: November 3, 2021 SUBMITTED BY: Kevin Cameron Senior Civil Engineer PROJECTS: P2593-001103 DIV. NO. 2 APPROVED BY: Bob Kennedy, Engineering Manager Rod Posada, Chief, Engineering Jose Martinez, General Manager SUBJECT: Award of a Construction Contract to Advanced Industrial Services, Inc. for the 458-1 Reservoir Interior/Exterior Coating & Upgrades Project GENERAL MANAGER’S RECOMMENDATION: That the Otay Water District (District) Board of Directors (Board) award a construction contract to Advanced Industrial Services, Inc. (AIS) and to authorize the General Manager to execute an agreement with AIS for the 458-1 Reservoir Interior/Exterior Coating & Upgrades Project in an amount not-to-exceed $774,169.00 (see Exhibit A for Project location). COMMITTEE ACTION: Please see Attachment A. PURPOSE: To obtain Board authorization for the General Manager to enter into a construction contract with AIS for the 458-1 Reservoirs Interior/ Exterior Coating & Upgrades Project in an amount not-to-exceed $774,169.00. AGENDA ITEM 6b 2 ANALYSIS: The 458-1 Reservoir is a 0.8 million-gallon (MG) potable water storage facility that serves portions of Chula Vista. It is one (1) of two (2) steel tanks in the 458 Pressure Zone. The 458-1 Reservoir was originally constructed in 1964 and was last recoated on the interior in 2008 and the exterior in 2003. The District’s corrosion consultant maintains a Corrosion Control Program (CCP) that addresses the installation, maintenance, and monitoring of corrosion protection systems for the District’s steel reservoirs and buried metallic piping. The CCP includes a reservoir maintenance schedule that shows the 458-1 Reservoir is due for recoating on both the interior and exterior surfaces. An in-service internal and external inspection was performed by CSI Services, Inc., which illustrates the interior roof coating is in fair to poor condition with areas of blistering on the shell and floor beneath the waterline. Although the blistering paint is still protecting the steel, blisters in the paint are the beginning signs of failure. The external inspection shows the coating in poor condition and has exceeded its useful life. During construction, service in the 458 Pressure Zone will be provided by the 458-2 Reservoir. The 458-2 Reservoir has a capacity of 1.75 MG and was last recoated in 2015. In addition to the interior and exterior coating removal/replacement, the recommended structural and safety upgrades are as follows: replace the existing level indicator, install new fall prevention devices on the exterior ladder, modify anode access ports, replace all cathodic anodes, replace the roof vent, relocate the roof hatch and interior ladder, install new safety cable lanyards for roof access, and add multiple tank penetrations for chlorination and sampling. These upgrades will ensure compliance with the American Water Works Association (AWWA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standards for both Federal (OSHA) and State (Cal-OSHA) as well as upgrade antiquated equipment on the tank. The Project was advertised on September 9, 2021, using Periscope S2G, the District’s online bid solicitation website, on the Otay Water District’s website, and in the Daily Transcript. A Pre-Bid Meeting was held on September 20, 2021, which was attended by six (6) contractors and vendors via an online Zoom meeting. Two (2) addenda were sent out to all bidders and plan houses to address questions and clarifications to the contract documents during the bidding period. Bids were publicly opened online via a Zoom meeting on September 30, 2021, with the following results: 3 CONTRACTOR TOTAL BID AMOUNT 1 Advanced Industrial Services, Inc. Los Alamitos, CA $774,169.00 2 Unified Field Services Corporation Bakersfield, CA $819,672.00 3 Paso Robles Tank, Inc. Hemet, CA $825,816.00 4 Simpson Sand Blasting & Special Coatings, Inc. Santa Maria, CA $1,022,388.00 5 Mericka Group, LLC. Westlake Village, CA $1,056,950.00 The Engineer's Estimate is $795,500. A review of the bids was performed by District staff for conformance with the contract requirements. Staff determined that AIS is the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. AIS holds a Class A Contractor’s license, which expires on January 31, 2022. AIS also holds a current QP-1 certification from the Society for Protective Coatings, which was also a requirement. AIS submitted the Company Background and Company Safety Questionnaires, as required by the Contract Documents. Staff checked references, and the response from other agencies indicated AIS has an excellent performance rating on similar projects. The proposed Project Manager has experience in California on similar projects and received excellent recommendations. AIS has worked with the District on previous coating projects, including the following reservoirs: 850-3, 832-2, 803-2, 803-3, 624-2, 711-1, 711-2, and 980-1. These successful projects were completed on time and on budget. Staff has verified that the bid bond provided by Travelers Casualty and Surety Company of America is valid. Once AIS signs the contract, they will furnish the performance bond and labor and materials bond. Staff will verify both bonds prior to executing the contract. FISCAL IMPACT: Joe Beachem, Chief Financial Officer The total budget for CIP P2593, as approved in the FY 2022 budget, is $1,050,000. Total expenditures, plus outstanding commitments and forecast, are $1,029,902. See Attachment B for the budget detail. Based on a review of the financial budget, the Project Manager anticipates that the budget for CIP P2593 is sufficient to support the Project. The Finance Department has determined that, under the current rate model, 100% of the funding is available from the Replacement Fund. 4 GRANTS/LOANS: Engineering staff researched and explored grants and loans and found none currently available for this Project. STRATEGIC GOAL: This Project supports the District’s Mission statement, “To provide exceptional water and wastewater service to its customers, and to manage District resources in a transparent and fiscally responsible manner” and the General Manager’s Vision, "To be a model water agency by providing stellar service, achieving measurable results, and continuously improving operational practices." LEGAL IMPACT: None. KC/BK:jf Https://otaywater365.sharepoint.com/sites/engcip/Shared Documents/P2593 458-1 Reservoir Int-Ext Coating & Upgrades/Staff Reports/11-3-21 Staff Report 458-1 Reservoir Coating.docx Attachments: Attachment A – Committee Action Attachment B – Budget Detail – CIP P2593 Exhibit A – Project Location for 458-1 Reservoir ATTACHMENT A SUBJECT/PROJECT: P2593-001103 Award of a Construction Contract to Advanced Industrial Services, Inc. for the 458-1 Reservoir Interior/Exterior Coating & Upgrades Project COMMITTEE ACTION: The Engineering, Operations, and Water Resources Committee (Committee) reviewed this item at a meeting held on October 18, 2021 and the following comments were made: • Staff recommended that the Board award a construction contract to Advanced Industrial Services (AIS) and to authorize the General Manager to execute an agreement with AIS for the 458-1 Reservoir Interior/Exterior Coating and Upgrades Project in an amount not-to-exceed $774,169.00. Following the discussion, the Committee supported staffs’ recommendation and presentation to the full board as a Consent Item. ATTACHMENT B – Budget Detail CIP P2593 SUBJECT/PROJECT: P2593-001103 Award of a Construction Contract to Advanced Industrial Services, Inc. for the 458-1 Reservoir Interior/Exterior Coating & Upgrades Project 9/29/2021 Budget 1,050,000 Planning Standard Salaries 7,500 6,926 574 7,500 Service Contracts 3,975 3,975 - 3,975 CSI SERVICES Regulatory Agency Fees 50 50 - 50 COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO Total Planning 11,525 10,951 574 11,525 Design Standard Salaries 15,000 3,050 11,950 15,000 Service Contracts - - - - Total Design 15,000 3,050 11,950 15,000 ConstructionStandard Salaries 90,000 - 90,000 90,000 Construcion Contract 774,169 - 774,169 774,169 ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL SERVICESService Contracts 30,000 - 30,000 30,000 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT40,000 - 40,000 40,000 COATING INSPECTION 2,000 - 2,000 2,000 WELDING INSPECTION20,000 - 20,000 20,000 WATCHLIGHT - SECURITY 1,000 - 1,000 1,000 MAYER REPROGRAPHICS2,000 - 2,000 2,000 STRUCTURAL ENGINEER 2,000 - 2,000 2,000 CLARKSON LABORATORYStandard Materials 500 - 500 500 STANDARD MATERIALS Project Closeout 3,000 - 3,000 3,000 CLOSEOUTProject Contingency 38,708 - 38,708 38,708 5% CONTINGENCY Total Construction 1,003,377 - 1,003,377 1,003,377 Grand Total 1,029,902 14,001 1,015,901 1,029,902 Vendor/Comments Otay Water DistrictP2593 - 458-1 Reservoir Interior/Exterior Coating Committed Expenditures Outstanding Commitment & Forecast Projected Final Cost OTAY WATER DISTRICT458-1 Reservoir Interior/Exterior Coating & UpgradesLOCATION MAP EXHIBIT AC:\OneDrive\Otay Water District\ENG CIP - Documents\P2593 458-1 Reservoir Int-Ext Coating & Upgrades\Graphics\Exhibits-Figures\NOE Exhibit.mxd !\ VICINITY MAP PROJECT SITE DIV 5 DIV 1 DIV 2 DIV 4 DIV 3 ÃÅ54 ÃÅ125 ÃÅ94 ÃÅ905 §¨¦805 FNTS 458-1RESERVOIR CIP P2593F 0 400200 Feet O L Y M P I C P K W Y BRANDYWINE AVE PT BARROW DR MORRO PT DR WES T POINT DR SEQUOIA ST STAFF REPORT TYPE MEETING: Regular Board MEETING DATE: November 3, 2021 SUBMITTED BY: Charles Mederos, Utility Services Manager PROJECT: P2282 DIV. NO. All APPROVED BY: Andrew Jackson, Chief Water Operations Jose Martinez, General Manager SUBJECT: AUTHORIZE THE PURCHASE OF SIX FLEET VEHICLES GENERAL MANAGER’S RECOMMENDATION: Authorize the General Manager to issue purchase orders to: •Fairview Ford in the amount of $75,432.81 for the purchase of two (2) 2022 Ford F-150 Pick-up Trucks; and, •Penske Ford in the amount of $128,011.16 for the purchase of four (4) 2022 Ford Ranger Pick-up Truck. For a total of six fleet vehicles with a total cost of $203,443.97. COMMITTEE ACTION: See Attachment “A.” PURPOSE: To obtain Board authorization to purchase six fleet replacement vehicles from the vendors specified with the lowest responsive quotes. ANALYSIS: There are seven vehicles included in the approved FY22 budget. The requested six vehicles will consist of replacing four of the following units and will add two vehicles for the new Recycled Water Specialist and Utility Locator. These four vehicles have exceeded the District’s vehicle replacement program of seven years and/or 100,000 miles for non-commercial vehicles. AGENDA ITEM 6c • Unit #177 (2009 Toyota Matrix Utility Maintenance – 99,524 miles). This unit is utilized by the Utility Maintenance Supervisor to perform field maintenance inspections, job walks, and supervision on Utility Maintenance staff. • Unit #178 (2009 Toyota Matrix Water Systems – 89,547 miles). This unit is utilized by the Water Systems Supervisor to perform leak and main break inspections as well as supervision on Water Systems staff. • Unit #196 (2009 Toyota Tacoma Recycled System Truck – 76,314 miles). This unit is utilized by the Recycled Water Systems Supervisor for operation and inspection of the recycled water systems. • Unit #221 (2014 Ford F150 Water Systems – 87,019 miles). This unit is assigned to the Water Systems Operators tasked with operating the water distribution system and responding to water emergencies. The Toyota Matrixes are being replaced with Ford Rangers for several reasons. For example, the 2021 Ford Ranger that the District currently has averages 30 MPG, while the Toyota Matrixes average 26 MPG. Another reason is the higher ground clearance on the Ford Ranger is 8.4 inches while the is Toyota Matrix 5.8 inches. Lastly, the ability to use the Ford Ranger’s cargo bed for transportation of light duty items to job sites. The second 2022 Ford F-150 Pick-up Truck is an addition to the District’s fleet and will be operated by the Utility Locator that was added to the Survey Section in FY22. The second Ford Ranger Pick-up Truck is an addition to the District’s fleet and will be operated by the Recycled Water Specialist that was added to the Recycled Water Section in FY22. Quotes were solicited for six vehicles via Periscope, the District’s purchasing solicitation system. Multiple quotes were received and are shown below. Prices received include all applicable fees, taxes, and delivery. Funding for these purchases is included in CIP P2282, Vehicle Capital Purchases Program. Two (2) 2022 Ford F-150 Pick-up Trucks Dealer Quote Price Fairview Ford – San Bernardino, CA $75,432.81 Penske Ford – La Mesa, CA $82,406.04 Kearny Person Ford – San Diego, CA $85,038.90 Encinitas Ford – Encinitas, CA $85,191.98 Four (4) 2021 Ford Ranger Pick-up Trucks Dealer Quote Price Penske Ford – La Mesa, CA $128,011.16 Encinitas Ford – Encinitas, CA $133,925.68 Kearny Pearson Ford – San Diego, CA $145,132.52 FISCAL IMPACT: Joe Beachem, Chief Financial Officer The total cost for the six vehicles is $203,443.97, which will be charged against the Vehicle Capital Purchases CIP P2282. The total cost will be an overage in budgeted funding by $14,443.97. The overage amount is due to inflation, COVID-19, and the original budgeted amount for two compact vehicles. The Finance Department has determined that 100 percent of the funds are available in the replacement and reserve funds to cover the cost and overage. The following expenditure summary shows the seven vehicles which were budgeted in CIP P2282 for FY22, including the six vehicles being requested in this staff report. Total CIP P2282 Vehicle Replacements FY22 Budget: $364,000.00 Six Fleet Trucks - Budgeted $203,443.97 One Class 7 Utility Truck - Budgeted $175,000.00 Projected CIP P2282 FY22 Budget: $378,443.97 STRATEGIC GOAL: Operate the system to meet demand 24 hours a day, seven days a week. LEGAL IMPACT: None. Attachment A - Committee Action Attachment B - Photos of Vehicles ATTACHMENT A SUBJECT/PROJECT: AUTHORIZE THE PURCHASE OF SIX FLEET VEHICLES COMMITTEE ACTION: The Engineering, Operations, and Water Resources Committee reviewed this item at a meeting held on October 18, 2021, and the following comments were made: • Staff recommended that the Board authorize the General Manager to issue purchase orders to Fairview Ford in the amount of $75,432.81 for the purchase of two (2) 2022 Ford F-150 Pick-up Trucks and Penske Ford in the amount of $128,011.16 for the purchase of four (4) 2022 Ford Ranger Pick-up Trucks for a total of six fleet vehicles with a total cost of $203,443.97. • In response to a question from the Committee, staff mentioned that at the beginning of 2024, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) wants to implement a proposed regulation which would mean that whatever vehicles the District replaces, 50% has to be zero or near zero emissions vehicles. As the District is an emergency responder, staff has requested an exemption to the 25% proposed regulation. The District has a current fleet of approximately 86 vehicles and approximately 46 vehicles are considered emergency response vehicles. More information will be forthcoming. Upon completion of the discussion, the committee supported staff’s recommendation and presentation to the full board on the consent calendar. 2022 Ford Ranger Replaces Unit #177, 2009 Toyota Matrix w/ 99,524 miles ATTACHMENT B 2022 Ford Ranger Replaces Unit #178, 2009 Toyota Matrix w/89,547 miles 2022 Ford Ranger Replaces Unit #196, 2009 Toyota Tacoma w/ 76,314 miles. 2022 Ford F-150 Replaces Unit #221, 2014 Ford F150 w/ 87,019 miles. STAFF REPORT TYPE MEETING: Regular Board MEETING DATE: November 3, 2021 PROJECT: Various DIV. NO. ALL SUBMITTED BY: Kent Payne Purchasing and Facilities Manager APPROVED BY: Adolfo Segura, Chief, Administrative Services Jose Martinez, General Manager SUBJECT: AUTHORIZE A TWO-YEAR FIXED CONTRACT, PLUS THREE (3) ONE-YEAR OPTIONS, WITH NATURESCAPE SERVICES, INC. FOR LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $617,724 GENERAL MANAGER’S RECOMMENDATION: That the Otay Water District (District) Board of Directors (Board) award a contract to NatureScape Services, Inc. (NatureScape) and authorize the General Manager to execute a two-year fixed contract, plus three (3) one-year options, with NatureScape of San Diego, CA, for landscape maintenance services in an amount not-to-exceed $617,724. COMMITTEE ACTION: See “Attachment A”. PURPOSE: To obtain Board authorization for the General Manager to enter into a two-year fixed contract with NatureScape, plus three (3) one-year options, for landscape maintenance services in an amount not-to- exceed $617,724. ANALYSIS: The District utilizes a multi-year contract for landscape maintenance AGENDA ITEM 6d 2 services to maintain its Administrative, Operations, and Treatment Plant facilities, as well as the remote pump stations, reservoirs, hydro stations, and easements. A scope of work matrix is provided (see “Attachment B”). Staff issued a Request for Proposals through its online solicitation portal, Periscope (formerly BidSync). Four (4) firms attended a mandatory pre-proposal meeting and site walk held at the main campus and at a number of remote facilities. The District received three (3) proposals that were evaluated by a three-person review panel that scored each submittal on Company Background, Staff Qualifications, and Quality Assurance. Separately, a score was assigned to each proposed contract fee, then added to the review panel ratings for a final score (see “Attachment C”). Firm 5-year Fee Hourly Rate Score NatureScape Services, Inc. $617,724 $30.00 84 Greenridge Landscape, Inc.* $709,932 $45.00 58 Aztec Landscaping, Inc. $953,351 $35.00 67 Monthly and annual fees are as follows: Calendar Year Monthly Fee Annual Fee 2022 $9,689 $116,268 2023 $9,789 $117,468 2024 Option 1 $9,999 $119,988 2025 Option 2 $10,750 $129,000 2026 Option 3 $11,250 $135,000 Contract Total $617,724 *Incumbent contract holder NatureScape received the highest score at 84 and was also determined to be the best overall value for the required scope of services. NatureScape is a local family-owned and operated landscape maintenance firm started in 1975 and incorporated in 2017. They employ 34 full-time and 22 seasonal workers. An internet search revealed no negative ratings or complaints. NatureScape is rated highly by public agency clients, which include the City of San Diego, City of Chula Vista, County of San Diego, San Diego County Water 3 Authority, and the San Diego Unified Port District. FISCAL IMPACT: Joe Beachem, Chief Financial Officer The annual landscape maintenance operating budget is $130,000. Of this amount, $116,268 will be utilized for calendar year 2022 of the contract. STRATEGIC GOAL: Supports the Districts Strategy: Ensure financial health through formalized policies, prudent investing, and efficient operations. LEGAL IMPACT: None. ATTACHMENTS: Attachment A – Committee Action Report Attachment B – Scope of Work Matrix Attachment C – Scoresheet ATTACHMENT A SUBJECT/PROJECT: AUTHORIZE A TWO-YEAR FIXED CONTRACT, PLUS THREE (3) ONE- YEAR OPTIONS, WITH NATURESCAPE SERVICES, INC. FOR LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $617,724 COMMITTEE ACTION: The Finance, Administration, and Communications Committee reviewed this item at a meeting held on October 20, 2021, and the following comments were made: • Staff requested that the General Manager be authorized to enter into a two-year fixed agreement, plus three (3) one-year options, with NatureScape Services, Inc. (NatureScape) for landscape maintenance services at a not-to-exceed amount of $617,724. • In response to a question from the Committee, staff noted that Greenridge Landscape, Inc. has held the landscape maintenance services contract with the District for 10 years; as they hold the current contract and held the previous contract as well. • Staff clarified that the “intentionally left blank” rows on the Scope of Work Matrix (Attachment B) are sites that have since been sold and were removed from the list, but the row remains as to not need to re-number all the sites. • The Committee inquired if the incumbent’s score, being lower than the other two firms, was an indicator of poor performance or due to another factor. Staff responded that the lower score is not due to inadequate service but rather their proposal for this upcoming contract lacked details that the other firms provided. 5 • It was discussed that NatureScape does perform work for other public agencies and these agencies reported being pleased with NatureScape’s performance. Upon completion of the discussion, the Committee supported staff’s recommendation and presentation to the full board as a consent item. ATTACHMENT B SUBJECT/PROJECT: AUTHORIZE A TWO-YEAR FIXED CONTRACT, PLUS THREE (3) ONE- YEAR OPTIONS, WITH NATURESCAPE SERVICES, INC. FOR LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $617,724 SCOPE OF WORK MATRIX # Facility Name Location Landscape General Duties* 1 1655-1 Hydro-Station 14810 Presilla Drive Jamul, CA 32.700722923410495, - 116.8387307638279 •Trim oleanders off the fence and top to fence line 2x a year. •Spray herbicides (systemic and preemergent) twice a year before rainy season or as needed. •Clean all culverts from dirt and debris •General clean-up of trash and debris. Haul away trimmings. •Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. •May need fire prevention natural growth removal. 2 Intentionally left blank 3 1485-1 Pump Station 14303 Lyons Valley Road, Jamul, CA 32.728975123374376, - 116.86297652076674 •Trim plants twice a year. •General clean-up of trash and debris as needed. Haul away trimmings. •Install/maintain and operate irrigation as needed. •Erosion controls install/maintain (including mud removal from asphalt). 4 1296-1-9 Tank (9-2 tank @ Bear Mt.) 13635 Bear Mountain Way, Jamul, CA 32.7101889011776, - 116.89260418539448 •General clean-up of trash, debris, and landscaped areas. •Clean all culverts from dirt and debris once a year before rainy season or as needed. •Line trim as needed for weed abatement. Haul away trimmings. •Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. •Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. 7 5 944-1-9 Pump Station (9-1 PS) 13255 Campo Road, Jamul, CA 32.72874729563849, - 116.89861552488024 • Trim and clean all landscaped areas three times a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Clean all culverts from dirt and debris before rainy season or as needed. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. 6 944-1-9 Tank and 944-2-9 Tank (9-1 tanks) 3102 Vista Diego Road, Jamul, CA • Trim and clean all landscaped areas three times a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Clean all culverts and storm drains from dirt and debris before rainy season. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. • Dirt removal from paved areas around tanks after rainy season. • Install/maintain erosion control. 7 Vista Diego Hydro Station 3151 Vista Diego Road, Jamul, CA 32.723259915929994, - 116.87881549967733 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. 8 832-1-2 Reservoir (2-1 Tank) 12118 Campo Road, El Cajon, CA 32.73396067514205, - 116.92881847188326 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. 9 832-1-2 Pump Station (2-1 PS) 12176 Highway 94, El Cajon, CA 32.73550561897947, - 116.93459247252014 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. • Removal of unwanted plant species among oleanders. 8 10 1090-1-2 Pump Station (2-2 PS) 3029 Millar Ranch Road, Spring Valley, CA 32.722730628573615, - 116.92341523060547 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Install/maintain, repair, and operate fire sprinklers around fence bi-weekly during summertime or fire season. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. • Weed control as needed. • Install/maintain erosion control as needed. 11 1090-1-2 Tank (2-2 tank) 12300 Millar Anita Lane, Spring Valley, CA 32.71976311486826, - 116.92319455798108 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Removal of natural growth for fire abatement/protection. • Rake around tank, outside and access roads. • Install/maintain, repair, and operate irrigation drip system. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. 12 Wastewater Reclamation Plant; and Steele Canyon PS 11901/11977 Singer Lane, Spring Valley, CA Reclamation Plant: 32.7281113759401, - 116.94721943623401 Steele Canyon PS: 32.734197119879155, - 116.94148071183844 • Trim oleanders at Steele Canyon PS Tank once a year. • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed • Trim all ice plant and ivy 3 times a year or as needed. • Apply granular pre-emergent as needed twice a year. • Line trim inside treatment plant for weed abatement 3 or 4 times a year or as needed. • Keep a 25 feet firebreak between fence line and natural growth vegetation before fire season. • Spray herbicides around roadway, treatment plant and accessories for weed prevention four times a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings. • Clean-up and mow roadside as needed. • Clean all culverts from dirt and debris before rainy season or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate all irrigation systems including adjusting timers for different seasons of the year. • Blow driveways and hardscapes as may be requested. 13 Cottonwood Meadows Sewer Lift Station 3550 Par Four Drive, El Cajon, CA 32.739909811891664, - 116.91929365129484 • Trim of fence and clean all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim inside station and entry access road for weed abatement twice a year or as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. 14 Intentionally left blank 9 15 860-1 Cottonwood Hydropneumatic Station Pump Station (Windriver) 2508 Windriver Road, El Cajon, CA 32.75338851918531, - 116.91056930191007 • Trim neighbor’s landscape overgrowth twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • General clean-up. • Line trim for weed abatement twice a year. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. 16 803-4 Tank (Vista Grande Reservoir) 1612 Vista Grande Road, El Cajon, CA 32.76960268564462, - 116.91066405085418 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas 3 times a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation d rip system or hand water during summer. • Install and maintain erosion control before rainy season. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention 3 times a year or as needed. • Clean all culverts from debris and dirt before rainy season or as needed. 17 1200-1-3 Tank 1697 Burris Drive, El Cajon, CA 32.76795586052126, - 116.90310707931694 • Bee removal as needed. • Trim natural growth to keep it contained within limits once a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation system. 18 978-2 Reservoir Filipponi Reservoir 1124 Vista Grande Road, El Cajon, CA 32.77788787445248, - 116.91037479676977 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Clean all culverts from debris and dirt before rainy season and as needed. • Set erosion control for protection of all culverts. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip line system. • Maintain clean all access road to the tank from the first chain link fence gate to second chain link fence gate. • Spread mulch around bottlebrushes as needed. 19 978-1-2 Reservoir (3-2 Res.) 2542 Pence Drive, El Cajon, CA 32.776558081950526, - 116.89806797066288 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas inside tank twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • Clean all culverts from dirt and debris before rainy season or as needed. • Maintain access road and trim and top oleanders twice a year. • Install/maintain and operate all irrigation systems. 10 20 803-3 Reservoir (Singing Hills Reservoir) 2568 Pence Drive, El Cajon, CA • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all cuttings and debris. • Clean all culverts from debris and dirt before rainy season. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. 21 Silverado Sewer Lift Station Camino De Las Piedras, El Cajon, CA 32.77050748670371, - 116.88077914855046 • General clean-up as needed. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention as needed. 22 Hidden Mesa Sewer Lift Station 1256 Hidden Mountain Drive, El Cajon, CA 32.776723599517446, - 116.91557748026821 • Trim and clean all landscaped areas, keep overgrowth away from stairs once a year. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention once a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. 23 803-2 Tank (20-3 Res.) 2825 Willow Glen Drive, El Cajon, CA 32.753407931069255, - 116.8941429995109 • Trim the roadside entrance to keep natural growth contained once a year or as needed. • Trim around fence to keep natural growth contained twice a year or as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. 24 Intentionally left blank 25 Russell Square Sewer PS 5139 ½ Russell Square, La Mesa, CA 32.77279785912984, - 116.96974240764581 • Trim all landscaped areas away from fence twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • General clean-up as needed. 26 Calavo Sewer Lift Station 3700 Avocado Blvd. @ Campo Road, La Mesa, CA 32.74728816994529, - 116.96256906759936 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscape areas twice a year or as needed. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate all drip irrigation system. 27 Intentionally left blank 11 28 Regulatory Reservoir 11880 Campo Road, Spring Valley, CA 32.74420079038116, - 116.94654134247054 • Install erosion control around storm drains before rainy season. • Line trim entrance road, reservoirs and inside property for weed abatement twice a • year, or as needed. • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas once a year, or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention 3 times a year or as needed. • Clean all culverts for dirt and debris before rainy season or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate all drip line irrigation system. • Clean around reservoir vaults, maintain free of weeds and debris as often as needed. 29 Intentionally left blank 30 850-1-1 Tank (20-1 Res, 1-6 Tank) 2105 Ledge Avenue, Spring Valley, CA 32.72635333708018, - 116.9785635020983 • Trim road entrance to keep natural growth contained once a year. • Line trim for weed abatement inside and outside twice a year or as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention inside and outside twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Clean all culverts from dirt and debris before rainy season or as needed. • Tree branch removal when needed. 31 850-1-RES; Pointe Hydro Station (1050 HS) 10105 Pure Waters Court, Spring Valley, CA 32.7187927802632, - 116.96300338300756 • Line trim for weed abatement twice a year or as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • General clean-up of trash and debris 3 times a year. 32 657-1/850-1 PRV. (La Presa PS) 10557 Jamacha Blvd., Spring Valley, CA 32.72425301927596, - 116.96970376943331 • Tree branch removal when needed. • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas once yearly or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement twice a year or as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • General clean-up of trash and debris twice a year. 33 657-1-1 and 657-2-1 Tanks (San Bernardino Tanks) 1156 San Bernardino Avenue, Spring Valley, CA 32.716065012706075, - 116.98615215112774 • Trim, Clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement including easement 3 times a year or as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate all drip line irrigation system. 12 34 1004-1-1 PS (Buena Vista PS and adjacent property) 1306 Buena Vista Avenue, Spring Valley, CA 32.71781963340492, - 116.99351796940242 • Pull all weeds, trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris, • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Clean outside road from debris twice a year. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention including adjacent lot, twice a year. • Maintain and operate irrigation system. Adjust irrigation timers according to yearly seasons. • Clean all culverts from dirt and debris before rainy season or as needed. 35 Intentionally left blank 36 Intentionally left blank 37 1004 Tank 1828 La Presa Ave., Spring Valley, CA 32.72610855530305, - 116.99209435468974 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Removal of natural growth for fire abatement/protection. • Rake around tank, outside and access roads. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. 38 Mexico Connection (TJ) International fence boundary 32.55322370317177, - 116.91901761264101 • Mow and line trim around property and valves for weed abatement twice a year. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Wash with water all pipes and concrete pad every two weeks. 39 870-1-7 Reservoir (Upper Res.) 440 North Alta Road, San Diego, CA 32.594773446305204, - 116.92707751528816 • Maintain a firebreak outside fence before fire season or as needed. • Mow and line trim property, valves, reservoirs, and vaults for weed abatement twice a year or as often as necessary. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Clean culverts from dirt and debris before rainy season. 40 High Head and Low Head PS Low Head: 32.59629631593492, - 116.92706618556636 800 and 1200 North Alta Road., High Head: 32.59525569178576, - 116.9256069085635 • Line trim around reservoir and pump stations for weed abatement twice a year. • Mow and line trim around all valves and vaults for weed abatement twice a year. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed 41 458-1-10 & 458-2-10 Reservoir 651 Pt. Barrow Drive, Chula Vista, CA 32.60574093348044, - 117.02580946979134 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year. • Remove any fallen trees or branches as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. • Spread mulch as needed. 13 42 Greg Rogers Sewer Lift Station 1195 Oleander Avenue., Chula Vista, CA 32.617679521533276, - 117.03440041064212 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas once a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip system. 43 Intentionally left blank 44 485-1-22 Tank (22-2 Res) 996 East H Street, Chula Vista, CA 32.63511540325052, - 117.01927415802191 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. Spread mulch as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Fallen tree branch removal as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip line system. 45 Rancho Del Rey Well site 760 N. Rancho del Rey Pkwy Chula Vista, CA 32.64519124685684, - 117.03288652057776 • Pull out weeds from property as often as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention as often as needed. • Haul away all debris. Spread mulch as needed. • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip line system. 46 624-2 Reservoir 2010 Gotham, Chula Vista, CA 32.64840910054817, - 116.97881276693982 • Mow and line trim for weed abatement twice a year. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. Spread mulch as needed. • Trim overgrowth on fence areas as needed. Rake for fallen debris as needed. • Tree and branch removal as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. Asphalt clean-up after rain. • Install erosion control around storm drains. 47 711-1-27 (7-11 Tanks) 2710 Otay Lakes Road access off or Park Meadows, Chula Vista, CA 32.647970505580105, - 116.95503839367176 • Spread mulch as needed. • Install erosion control around storm drains before rainy season. • Line trim for weed abatement as often as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Trim and clean all landscaped areas twice a year. • Tree and branch removal as needed. • Haul all trimmings and debris. • Clean all culverts from debris and dirt before rainy season or as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip line system. 14 48 624-3 Reservoir (30 Million) 1230 Eastlake Parkway, Chula Vista, CA 32.63492102495674, - 116.96958889153214 • Inspect and assign work to landscape contractors weekly. • Make recommendations as to how to improve landscaped areas weekly. • Troubleshoot irrigation systems as needed. 49 711-1 Pump Station Central Area 10391 Otay Lakes Road, Chula Vista, CA 32.63757558739006, - 116.97343213757372 • Mow and line trim upper, lower property, all vaults, valves, and easement for weed abatement 3 times a year. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention 3 times a year. • Clean all culverts from dirt and debris at the upper and lower property before rainy season or as needed. • Install and maintain erosion control program before rainy season. • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip line system. 50 980-1 PS (EastLake 980 PS) 2406 Otay Lakes Road, Chula Vista, CA 32.64922092407599, - 116.96133257495077 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Clean around pump station for trash and debris as often as needed. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation systems weekly. • Tree trimming and branch removal as needed. 51 711-3 Res. Hunte Parkway and Salt Creek Golf Course, Chula Vista, CA 32.66839070371882, - 116.9550217140657 • Inspect and assign work to landscape contractors weekly. • Make recommendations to landscape contractors weekly. • Maintain and operate irrigation systems as needed. • Mow and line trim around property boundaries and wild habitat fencing twice a year or as needed. • Repair and inspect wild habitat fencing as often as needed. • Haul away any trimmings or debris. 52 980-1-27 and 980-2-27 Res (Use Area) End of road Hunte Parkway and Salt Creek Golf Course Chula Vista, CA 32.68228113563474, - 116.95579978329295 • Inspect and repair wild habitat fencing as needed. • Line trim and power mow around reservoir and adjacent areas for weed abatement twice a year. • Spray herbicides for weed control twice a year. • Remove fallen trees as needed. 15 53 Main Yard (Ops and Admin Buildings) 2553-2554 Sweetwater Springs Blvd., Spring Valley, CA 32.72444055730977, - 116.96701539344284 • General clean-up of trash and debris as often as needed. • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas as needed. • Water schedule and maintenance. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation systems. Adjust timers according to yearly seasons. • Supply mulch for landscape contractors as needed. • Inspect and assign work of landscape contractors weekly. • Make recommendations to landscape contractors weekly. 54 450-1 Recycle Tank 1680 Maxwell Rd., Chula Vista, CA 32.605133895814426, - 117.02238965058142 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. Spread mulch as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Fallen tree branch removal as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip line system. 55 1485-1 & 2 Reservoir 15008 Lyons Valley Rd, Jamul, CA 32.73264419522376, - 116.83467824891598 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. Spread mulch as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Fallen tree branch removal as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip line system. 56 Intentionally left blank 57 Future N-S Pump Station Site Parcels 5809-5835 Quarry Rd Bonita, CA 91902 32.68905917613489, - 117.01565759738499 • Mow and line trim for weed abatement twice a year. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention three times a year. • Tree and branch removal as needed • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • General clean-up for trash and debris as often as needed 58 850-3 RES 12887 Wieghorst Way, El Cajon, CA 32.75823741939893, - 116.93117888475454 • Line trim for weed abatement twice a year or as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year or as needed. • General clean-up of trash and debris 3 times a year or as needed. 16 59 870-2 Pump Station 440 ALTA RD, SAN DIEGO, CA 92154 32.593388672943945, - 116.92654746075392 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. Spread mulch as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Fallen tree branch removal as needed. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation drip line system. 60 Easement - Sewer Line Approx 1300 Linear Feet 12-foot clearance PASEO SALAMONER, LA MESA, 91941 32.744641, -116.954781 32.74465351198073, - 116.95463843844432 • Line trim and clear brush along access and around clean outs once per year 61 Summit Chlorine Station 444 Ruxton Ave., Spring Valley, CA 32.70597773835129, - 117.0061816523569 • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for week prevention twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. 62 1100-1 Hydro Station 475 Coastal Hills Drive, Chula Vista 32.67202610086155, - 116.9421217881619 • Trim, clean and fertilize all landscaped areas twice a year. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. • Clean around pump station for trash and debris as often as needed. • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for weed prevention twice a year. • Install/maintain and operate irrigation systems weekly. • Tree trimming and branch removal as needed. 63 927-2 RECY - RES 520 Hunte Parkway, Chula Vista 32.68032367933262, - 116.95367899752998 • Line trim for weed abatement as needed. • Spray herbicides for week prevention twice a year or as needed. • Haul away all trimmings and debris. *Duties may be modified from time-to-time as circumstances require. 17 ATTACHMENT C SUBJECT/PROJECT: AUTHORIZE A TWO-YEAR FIXED CONTRACT, PLUS THREE (3) ONE-YEAR OPTIONS, WITH NATURESCAPE SERVICES, INC. FOR LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO- EXCEED $617,724 SCORESHEET FY22-2231-008 - Landscape Maintenance Services Company Background Staff Qualifications Quality Assurance Combined Rating Fee Total Score SCORE 20 25 25 70 30 100 AZTEC LANDSCAPING, INC. Evaluator 1 19 23 23 65.67 1 67 Evaluator 2 19 24 25 Evaluator 3 18 23 23 $953,351 Greenridge Landscape, Inc. Evaluator 1 13 11 12 43.33 15 58 Evaluator 2 13 11 12 Evaluator 3 17 20 21 $709,932 NatureScape Services, Inc. Evaluator 1 16 17 17 54.00 30 84 Evaluator 2 16 17 17 Evaluator 3 18 21 23 $617,724 STAFF REPORT TYPE MEETING: Regular Board Meeting MEETING DATE: November 3, 2021 SUBMITTED BY: Jose Martinez, General Manager W.O./G.F. NO: DIV. NO. APPROVED BY: Tita Ramos-Krogman, District Secretary Jose Martinez, General Manager SUBJECT: Board of Directors 2021 and 2022 Calendars of Meetings GENERAL MANAGER’S RECOMMENDATION: At the request of the Board, the attached Board of Director’s meeting calendars for 2021 and 2022 are being presented for discussion. PURPOSE: This staff report is being presented to provide the Board the opportunity to review the 2021 and 2022 Board of Director’s meeting calendars and amend the schedules as needed. COMMITTEE ACTION: N/A ANALYSIS: The Board requested that this item be presented at each meeting so they may have an opportunity to review the Board meeting calendar schedule and amend it as needed. STRATEGIC GOAL: N/A FISCAL IMPACT: None. LEGAL IMPACT: None. Attachment: Calendars of Meetings for 2021 and 2022 G:\UserData\DistSec\WINWORD\STAFRPTS\Board Meeting Calendar 11-03-21.doc AGENDA ITEM 7b Board of Directors, Workshops and Committee Meetings (Via Teleconference) 2021 Regular Board Meetings: Special Board or Committee Meetings (3rd Wednesday of Each Month or as Noted) January 6, 2021 February 3, 2021 March 3, 2021 April 7, 2021 May 5, 2021 June 2, 2021 July 7, 2021 August 4, 2021 September 1, 2021 October 6, 2021 November 3, 2021 December 1, 2021 January 20, 2021 February 17, 2021 March 17, 2021 April 21, 2021 May 19, 2021 June 16, 2021 July 21, 2021 August 18, 2021 September 15, 2021 October 20, 2021 November 16, 2021 December 15, 2021 Board of Directors, Workshops and Committee Meetings (Via Teleconference) 2022 Regular Board Meetings: Special Board or Committee Meetings (3rd Wednesday of Each Month or as Noted) January 5, 2022 February 2, 2022 March 2, 2022 April 6, 2022 May 4, 2022 June 1, 2022 July 6, 2022 August 3, 2022 September 7, 2022 October 5, 2022 November 2, 2022 December 7, 2022 January 19, 2022 February 16, 2022 March 16, 2022 April 20, 2022 May 18, 2022 June 15, 2022 July 20, 2022 August 17, 2022 September 21, 2022 October 19, 2022 November 16, 2022 December 21, 2022 STAFF REPORT TYPE MEETING: Regular Board MEETING DATE: November 3, 2021 PROJECT: Various DIV. NO. ALL SUBMITTED BY: Kent Payne Purchasing and Facilities Manager APPROVED BY: Adolfo Segura, Chief, Administrative Services Jose Martinez, General Manager SUBJECT: AUTHORIZE A TWO-YEAR FIXED CONTRACT, PLUS THREE (3) ONE-YEAR OPTIONS, WITH AZTEC JANITORIAL SERVICES FOR JANITORIAL SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $525,181.20 GENERAL MANAGER’S RECOMMENDATION: That the Otay Water District (District) Board of Directors (Board) award a contract to Aztec Janitorial Services (Aztec) and authorize the General Manager to execute a two-year fixed contract, plus three (3) one-year options, with Aztec of Lemon Grove, CA, for janitorial services at the Administration, Operations, Warehouse, and Treatment Plant buildings, plus seven remote facility restrooms in an amount not-to- exceed $525,181.20. COMMITTEE ACTION: See “Attachment A”. PURPOSE: To obtain Board authorization for the General Manager to enter into a two-year fixed contract with Aztec, plus three (3) one-year options, for janitorial services in an amount not-to-exceed $525,181.20. ANALYSIS: The District utilizes a multi-year contract for janitorial services at its main facilities and seven remote sites. A scope of work matrix is AGENDA ITEM 8A 2 provided (see “Attachment B”). Staff issued a Request for Proposal through its online solicitation portal, Periscope (formerly BidSync). Seven (7) firms attended a mandatory pre-proposal meeting via Zoom and a site walk was conducted at the main campus. The District received three (3) proposals as of the submittal deadline. These proposals were evaluated by a three-person review panel that scored each firm’s experience, proposed supervisor qualifications, quality control plan, and monthly fee for each year of the contract (see “Attachment C”). Firm Five-Year Fee Total Score Aztec Janitorial Services $525,181.20 63 JLK Enterprise, Inc. $519,600.00 51 T&T Janitorial, Inc.* $319,800.00 60 Monthly and annual fees are as follows: Calendar Year Monthly Fee Annual Fee 2022 $8,409.90 $100,918.80 2023 $8,578.00 $102,936.00 2024 Option 1 $8,749.50 $104,994.00 2025 Option 2 $8,924.60 $107,095.20 2026 Option 3 $9,103.10 $109,237.20 Contract Total $525,181.20 *Incumbent contract holder Aztec’s proposal received the highest score and was determined to be the best value for the required scope of services. Staff checked their references and all rated Aztec as good to excellent. An internet search revealed no negative ratings or complaints. Aztec is a locally owned company located in Lemon Grove, CA, and has been providing janitorial services for over 29 years. Aztec’s current clients include SANDAG, City of Murrieta, and KRA Corporation. FISCAL IMPACT: Joe Beachem, Chief Financial Officer The annual contracted services operating budget is sufficient to cover the yearly cost of the contract. 3 STRATEGIC GOAL: Supports the Districts Strategy: Ensure financial health through formalized policies, prudent investing, and efficient operations. LEGAL IMPACT: None. ATTACHMENTS: Attachment A – Committee Action Report Attachment B – Scope of Work Matrix Attachment C – Scoresheet 4 ATTACHMENT A SUBJECT/PROJECT: AUTHORIZE A TWO-YEAR FIXED CONTRACT, PLUS THREE (3) ONE- YEAR OPTIONS, WITH AZTEC JANITORIAL SERVICES FOR JANITORIAL SERVICES IN AN AMOUNT NOT-TO-EXCEED $525,181.20 COMMITTEE ACTION: The Finance, Administration, and Communications Committee reviewed this item at a meeting held on October 20, 2021, and the following comments were made: • Staff is requesting that the General Manager be authorized to enter into a two-year fixed agreement, plus three (3) one-year options, with Aztec for janitorial services at District facilities in an amount not-to-exceed $525,181.20. • Due to COVID-19, it was noted that staff reviewed and updated the Scope of Work Matrix (Attachment B) to ensure that it includes a proper focus on sanitizing and hygiene wherever required. • Staff explained that while Aztec submitted the highest fee; they also received the highest overall score of 63 out of 100. T&T Janitorial (T&T), the incumbent contract holder, received the next highest score based solely on their fee; as they received the lowest evaluator score by a significant margin. The evaluator score considered items such as the Company’s Experience and Quality Assurance Plan. Staff is also concerned that T&T’s proposed fee does not adequately cover the labor, equipment, and cleaning supply requirements in the Scope of Work Matrix. • Staff noted that Aztec is a full-service maintenance company; a division of the Lemon Grove based Aztec Landscape, Inc. with 300 employees. Aztec’s references rated their service as excellent; and the District’s experience with both Aztec Janitorial and Aztec Landscaping has been very positive. • The Committee asked staff to further explain why T&T is not being recommended despite costing approximately $205,000 less than the recommended firm and how that relates to the possibility that 5 T&T’s proposed fee is inadequate. Staff pointed out that two of the three firms proposed fees in the $500,000 range, closer to current industry standards, and that T&T is the outlier. Staff also mentioned that T&T has struggled to provide adequate service to the District and cannot see how that would improve based on their proposal. Staff performed a calculation based on the number of hours believed to be necessary to service the District; that amount alone nears T&T’s proposed fee prior to considering cleaning supplies, overhead, or inflation. Staff is concerned that if T&T were chosen, the District would continue to receive inadequate service by being shorted on labor hours, supplies, or both. Staff would not recommend T&T, especially considering the increased need for effective sanitization due to COVID-19. • The Committee inquired why T&T received a respectable score of 60, despite the concerns staff cited. Staff explained that a third of the total score is based on fees alone, which nets 30 points to the lowest proposed fee. In this case, half of T&T’s score was based solely on their low bid. When looking at the other criteria, T&T scored the lowest across the board. • In response to a concern from the Committee, staff indicated that the District would not have exercised the final one-year option with T&T if it were not for COVID-19. Due to COVID-19, District facilities were largely unoccupied with only limited staff on- site. • The potential benefits of issuing another RFP were discussed but ultimately staff did not believe under the current environment of a labor shortage that any responses would be more competitive than those just received. • It was highlighted that what is being requested is the authorization to enter into a two-year fixed contract with the option to extend, but the District can go out to bid after the initial two-year contract is complete. Following the discussion, the Committee supported staff’s recommendation and presentation to the full board as an action item. Task #Lunchroom and Department Kitchenettes: M T W T F 1 Faucets, Sinks and Drains:clean and polish; remove all stains 2 Microwaves:clean and sanitize interior; polish exterior 3 Coffee Machine and Toasters:clean, polish exteriors 4 Refrigerators and Vending Machines:clean, sanitize exteriors 5 Countertops, Cabinet Faces and Handles:clean and sanitize 6 Lunchroom Tables, Chairs & Furniture:clean and sanitize 7 Waste Containers:empty, replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean 8 Floors:sweep, mop and sanitize 9 Wall Switches:clean and sanitize Task #Restrooms and Gym Locker Rooms: M T W T F 1 Sinks and Faucets:clean, sanitize and polish 2 Countertops:clean and sanitize 3 Mirrors:clean and polish 4 Toilets, *Urinals and Flushers:clean, sanitize and polish; remove stains and buildup *monthly replace urinal mats (provided by Otay) 5 Toilet Seats:clean and sanitize top and underneath; remove stains 6 Dispensers:clean, sanitize and polish; refill soap, paper towels, toilet paper and seat covers 7 Waste Containers:empty and replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean and polish 8 Sanitary Napkins:empty container and replace inserts 9 Partitions and Handles:wipe down and sanitize 10 Floors:sweep, mop and sanitize 11 Gym Showers:clean and sanitize; remove buildup and stains; polish metal fixtures Task #Common Areas, Meeting Rooms, Offices & Cubicles: M T W T F 1 Waste & Recycle Containers:empty and replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean and polish 2 Lobby Security Glass:spot clean both sides per strict instructions on file 3 Glass Doors and Partitions:spot clean and polish 4 Drinking Fountains:clean, sanitize and polish 5 Door Handles:clean and sanitize 6 Conference Rooms:dust and clean tables 7 Carpeted Walkways and Copier Areas:vacuum 8 Main Entrance Exterior:sweep clean 9 Non-Carpeted Floors:sweep, clean and mop 10 Interior Stairway:sweep and clean treads; clean and sanitize handrails 11 Elevators:clean and sanitize buttons; polish metal surfaces 12 Wall Switches:clean and sanitize Task #Lunchroom and Department Kitchenettes: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Countertops, Cabinet Faces and Handles:detail clean tops, corners, edges, backsplash 2 Lunchroom Floor:clean, wax and polish 3 Kitchenette Floor:detail clean/polish floor, base, corners, under/behind refrigerators 4 Refrigerators and Vending Machines:clean top, exteriors, water dispensers Task #Restrooms and Gym Locker Rooms: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Floors and Base:detail clean floors, edges, corners, grout 2 Partitions and Ceramic Tile Walls:wash down and sanitize 3 Gym Showers:detail clean floors, edges, corners, grout Task #Common Areas, Meeting Rooms, Offices & Cubicles: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Lobby Security Glass:fully clean both sides per strict instructions on file 2 Glass Doors and Partitions:fully clean and polish 3 Meeting Rooms:vacuum and dust chairs and furniture 4 Board Room:clean and polish the Dais, wood surfaces; vacuum and dust chairs and furniture 5 Elevator Floors:detail clean and polish 6 Ceiling Vents:brush down and vacuum 7 Carpet:detail vacuum offices, cubicles, walkways, Board room, training room, etc. Administration Building Daily Tasks Administration Building Quarterly Tasks* Scope of Work Matrix 8 Cobwebs:remove from walls, ceilings, windows 9 Dust:file cabinets, bookcases, shelves, desks, fixtures, baseboards, pictures, windowsills, high reach ledges, partition tops, door tops, air conditioning vents 10 Doors and Frames: clean, remove smudges and marks 11 Floors:detail clean and polish floors, edges, corners, base 12 Painted Walls: spot clean Task #Janitor and Utility Rooms: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Floors:detail clean and polish floors, edges, corners, base 2 Utility Sinks and Drains:detail clean and sanitize; remove stains and buildup *Work to be observed and certified by janitorial supervisor; duties may be modified from time-to-time as circumstances require. Scope of Work Matrix Task #Crew Room and Department Kitchenettes: M T W T F 1 Faucets, Sinks and Drains:clean and polish; remove all stains 2 Microwaves:clean and sanitize interior; polish exterior 3 Coffee Machine and Toasters:clean, polish exteriors 4 Refrigerators and Vending Machines:clean, sanitize exteriors 5 Countertops, Cabinet Faces and Handles:clean and sanitize 6 Waste Containers:empty, replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean 7 Floors:sweep, mop and sanitize 8 Wall Switches:clean and sanitize Task #Restrooms and Locker Rooms: M T W T F 1 Sinks and Faucets:clean, sanitize and polish 2 Countertops:clean and sanitize 3 Mirrors:clean and polish 4 Toilets, *Urinals and Flushers:clean, sanitize and polish; remove stains and buildup *monthly replace urinal mats (provided by Otay) 5 Toilet Seats:clean and sanitize top and underneath; remove stains 6 Dispensers:clean, sanitize and polish; refill soap, paper towels, toilet paper and seat covers 7 Waste Containers:empty and replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean and polish 8 Sanitary Napkins:empty container and replace inserts 9 Partitions and Handles:wipe down and sanitize 10 Floors:sweep, mop and sanitize 11 Showers:clean and sanitize; remove buildup and stains; polish metal fixtures Task #Common Areas, Meeting Rooms, Offices & Cubicles: M T W T F 1 Waste & Recycle Containers:empty and replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean and polish 2 Glass Doors and Partitions:spot clean and polish 3 Drinking Fountains:clean, sanitize and polish 4 Door Handles:clean and sanitize 5 Conference Rooms:dust and clean tables 6 Carpeted Walkways and Copier Areas:vacuum 7 Main Entrance Exterior:sweep clean 8 Non-Carpeted Floors:sweep, clean and mop 9 Exterior Stairway:sweep and clean treads 10 Elevators:clean and sanitize buttons; polish metal surfaces 11 Wall Switches:clean and sanitize Task #Lunchroom and Department Kitchenettes: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Countertops, Cabinet Faces and Handles:clean tops, corners, edges, backsplash 2 Kitchenette Floor:detail clean/polish floor, base, corners, under/behind refrigerators 3 Refrigerators and Vending Machines:clean top, exteriors, water dispensers Task #Restrooms and Gym Locker Rooms: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Floors and Base:detail clean floors, edges, corners, grout 2 Partitions and Ceramic Tile Walls:wash down and sanitize 3 Gym Showers:detail steam clean; remove buildup and stains; polish metal fixtures Task #Common Areas, Meeting Rooms, Offices & Cubicles: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Lobby Security Glass:fully clean both sides per strict instructions on file 2 Glass Doors and Partitions:fully clean and polish 3 Meeting Rooms:vacuum and dust chairs and furniture 4 Board Room:clean and polish the Dais, wood surfaces; vacuum and dust chairs and furniture 5 Elevator Floors:detail clean and polish 6 Ceiling Vents:brush down and vacuum 7 Carpet:detail vacuum offices, cubicles, walkways, Board room, training room, etc. 8 Cobwebs:remove from walls, ceilings, windows 9 Dust:file cabinets, bookcases, shelves, desks, fixtures, baseboards, pictures, windowsills, high reach ledges, partition tops, door tops, air conditioning vents Operations Admin, Crew Room and Fleet Shop Quarterly Tasks* Operations Admin, Crew Room and Fleet Shop Daily Tasks Scope of Work Matrix 10 Doors and Frames: clean, remove smudges and marks 11 Floors:detail clean and polish floors, edges, corners, base 12 Painted Walls: spot clean Task #Janitor and Utility Rooms: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Floors:detail clean and polish floors, edges, corners, base 2 Utility Sinks and Drains:detail clean and sanitize; remove stains and buildup *Work to be observed and certified by janitorial supervisor; duties may be modified from time-to-time as circumstances require. Scope of Work Matrix Task #Restrooms: M T W T F 1 Sinks, Countertops & Faucets:clean, sanitize and polish 2 Mirrors:clean and polish 3 Toilets, *Urinals and Flushers:clean, sanitize and polish; remove stains and buildup *monthly replace urinal mats (provided by Otay) 4 Toilet Seats:clean and sanitize top and underneath; remove stains 5 Dispensers:clean, sanitize and polish; refill soap, paper towels, toilet paper and seat covers 6 Waste Containers:empty and replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean and polish 7 Sanitary Napkins:empty container and replace inserts 8 Partitions and Handles:wipe down and sanitize 9 Floors:sweep, mop and sanitize Task #Common Areas, Warehouse & Shops Offices: M T W T F 1 Microwaves:clean and sanitize interior; polish exterior 2 Coffee Machine:clean, polish exteriors 4 Waste & Recycle Containers:empty and replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean and polish 5 Drinking Fountains:clean, sanitize and polish 6 Door Handles:clean and sanitize 7 Warehouse Office:vacuum 9 Front Warehouse Floors:sweep, clean and mop 10 Wall Switches:clean and sanitize Task #Restrooms: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Floors and Base:detail clean floors, edges, corners, grout 2 Partitions and Laminate Walls:wash down and sanitize Task #Warehouse & Shops Offices: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Ceiling Vents:brush down and vacuum 2 Floors:detail clean: vacumm, sweep, mop 3 Cobwebs:remove from walls, ceilings, windows (Shop and Warehouse Offices only) 4 Dust:file cabinets, bookcases, shelves, desks, fixtures, baseboards, pictures, windowsills, door tops, air conditioning vents 5 Doors and Frames: clean, remove smudges and marks 6 Painted Walls: spot clean *Work to be observed and certified by janitorial supervisor; duties may be modified from time-to-time as circumstances require. Warehouse Daily Tasks Warehouse Quarterly Tasks* Scope of Work Matrix Task #Lunchroom: M T W T F 1 Faucets, Sinks and Drains:clean and polish; remove all stains 2 Microwaves:clean and sanitize interior; polish exterior 3 Coffee Machine and Toasters:clean, polish exteriors 4 Refrigerators:clean, sanitize exteriors 5 Countertops, Cabinet Faces and Handles:clean and sanitize 6 Lunchroom Tables:clean and sanitize 7 Waste Containers:empty, replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean 8 Floors:sweep, mop and sanitize 9 Wall Switches:clean and sanitize Task #Restrooms and Locker Rooms: M T W T F 1 Sinks and Faucets:clean, sanitize and polish 2 Countertops:clean and sanitize 3 Mirrors:clean and polish 4 Toilets, Urinals and Flushers:clean, sanitize and polish; remove stains and buildup 5 Toilet Seats:clean and sanitize top and underneath; remove stains 6 Dispensers:clean, sanitize and polish; refill soap, paper towels, toilet paper and seat covers 7 Waste Containers:empty and replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean and polish 8 Sanitary Napkins:empty container and replace inserts 9 Partitions and Handles:wipe down and sanitize 10 Floors:sweep, mop and sanitize 11 Showers:clean and sanitize; remove buildup and stains; polish metal fixtures Task #Common Areas and Offices: M T W T F 1 Waste & Recycle Containers:empty and replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean and polish 2 Drinking Fountains:clean, sanitize and polish 3 Door Handles:clean and sanitize 4 Carpeted Walkways:vacuum 5 Admin Trailer Entrance Exterior:sweep clean 6 Non-Carpeted Floors:sweep, clean and mop 7 Wall Switches:clean and sanitize Task #Lunchroom: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Countertops, Cabinet Faces and Handles:detail clean tops, corners, edges, backsplash 2 Lunchroom Floor:clean, wax and polish 3 Refrigerators:clean top, exteriors, water dispensers Task #Restrooms and Locker Rooms: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Floors and Base:detail clean floors, edges, corners, grout 2 Partitions and Ceramic Tile Walls:wash down and sanitize 3 Showers:detail steam clean; remove buildup and stains; polish metal fixtures Task #Common Areas, Meeting Rooms, Offices & Cubicles: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 3 Meeting Rooms:vacuum and dust chairs and furniture 6 Ceiling Vents:brush down and vacuum 7 Admin Trailer Carpet:detail vacuum offices, cubicles, walkways, Board room, training room, etc. 8 Cobwebs:remove from walls, ceilings, windows 9 Dust:file cabinets, bookcases, shelves, desks, fixtures, baseboards, pictures, windowsills, high reach ledges, partition tops, door tops, air conditioning vents 10 Doors and Frames: clean, remove smudges and marks 11 Floors:detail clean and polish floors, edges, corners, base 12 Painted Walls: spot clean *Work to be observed and certified by janitorial supervisor; duties may be modified from time-to-time as circumstances require. Treatment Plant Lab and Admin Trailer Daily Tasks Treatment Plant Lab and Admin Trailer Quarterly Tasks* Scope of Work Matrix Task #Restrooms: 1 2 1 Sinks, Faucets & Countertops:clean, sanitize and polish 2 Mirrors:clean and polish 3 Toilets, Urinals and Flushers:clean, sanitize and polish; remove stains and buildup 4 Toilet Seats:clean and sanitize top and underneath; remove stains 5 Dispensers:clean, sanitize and polish; refill soap, paper towels, toilet paper and seat covers 6 Waste Containers:empty and replace liners (supplied by Otay), clean and polish 7 Sanitary Napkins:empty container and replace inserts 8 Partitions and Handles:wipe down and sanitize 9 Floors:sweep, mop and sanitize Task #Restrooms: Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Floors and Base:detail clean floors, edges, corners, grout 2 Partitions and Ceramic Tile Walls:wash down and sanitize 3 Showers:detail clean; remove buildup and stains; polish metal fixtures 4 Ceiling Vents:brush down and vacuum 5 Cobwebs:remove from walls, ceilings, windows 6 Doors and Frames: clean, remove smudges and marks 7 Painted Walls: spot clean Pump Stations (7) Quarterly Tasks Pump Stations (7) Twice Weekly Tasks 1296 PS - Buena Vista - Regulatory - Central - 30 Million - 450/680 Recycled - 870-2 PS Scope of Work Matrix Scoresheet Company Background Staff Qualifications Quality Assurance Combined Rating Fee Total Score 20 20 30 70 30 100 Evaluator 1 20 20 30 Evaluator 2 17 17 22 Evaluator 3 18 18 25 $525,181 Evaluator 1 15 15 15 Evaluator 2 16 14 19 Evaluator 3 15 16 21 $519,600 Evaluator 1 10 10 10 Evaluator 2 15 13 16 Evaluator 3 5 5 6 $319,800 30.00 63 51 60 1 2 30 SCORE AZTEC JANITORIAL SERVICES JLK ENTERPRISE, INC. T&T JANITORIAL, INC. 62.33 48.67 STAFF REPORT TYPE MEETING: Regular Board MEETING DATE: November 3, 2021 SUBMITTED BY: Andrea Carey, Customer Service Manager Lisa Coburn-Boyd, Environmental Compliance Specialist PROJECT NO: DIV. NO.All APPROVED BY: Joseph R. Beachem, Chief Financial Officer Jose Martinez, General Manager SUBJECT: Adopt Resolution No. 4402 as Required for a Grant Funding Application for the United States Bureau of Reclamation’s WaterSMART: Water and Energy Efficiency Grant Project Funding for Fiscal Year 2022 GENERAL MANAGER’S RECOMMENDATION: That the Board adopt Resolution No. 4402 (Attachment B) required for a grant funding application to be submitted to the United States Bureau of Reclamation’s WaterSMART: Water and Energy Efficiency Grant (WEEG) funding program for Fiscal Year 2022. Resolution No. 4402 verifies that the Otay Water District (District) General Manager (GM) is authorized to review the application and execute the agreement that provides for the District to provide the minimum 50% funding match, and that District staff will meet all deadlines for entering into the grant agreement for the District’s Phase One Advanced Meter Infrastructure (AMI) and Customer Engagement Portal Project. COMMITTEE ACTION: Please see Attachment A. PURPOSE: The Board’s adoption of Resolution No. 4402 is a requirement for an application that will be submitted by District staff, no later than AGENDA ITEM 8b 2 the submittal deadline of November 3, 2021, for grant funds through the United States Bureau of Reclamation’s WaterSMART: WEEG funding program for Fiscal Year 2022. The Resolution verifies that the District GM is authorized to enter into an agreement with the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and review and support the application. It also commits the District to providing the minimum 50% funding match specified in the funding plan for the application and that District staff will work with USBR to meet all deadlines for entering into the grant agreement. Although the application will be submitted on or before the due date of November 3, 2021, the required Board Resolution can be provided up to 30 days after submittal of the application. ANALYSIS: In October 2021, District staff worked with an as-needed project funding consultant, Hoch Consulting, to complete a grant application for the Phase One AMI and Customer Engagement Portal Project for submittal to the USBR’s WaterSMART: WEEG funding program opportunity for Fiscal Year 2022. The Phase One AMI and Customer Engagement Portal Project (Phase One Project) will enhance the District’s existing meter program. In 2016, the District began an Automated Meter Reading (AMR) Change Out CIP to change out aging AMR registers for all ¾”-2” meters. From 2016-2020, all District ¾”-2” meters had a register replacement. To take advantage of warranty pricing, approximately 18,000 registers were replaced with existing 3G technology which only allows meters to be read by a meter reader driving by the meter and picking up the read via a transponder in the register. However, a larger percentage (approximately 32,000) were upgraded to 4G technology, which permits reads by both driving by the meter and AMI. AMI allows the meters to automatically upload meter reads to data collectors located on District facilities and is relayed directly to the office. AMI uses radio-based technology to read water meters, and this eliminates the need for deploying a vehicle to collect the meter reads. Currently, the District reads all meters via drive-by on a monthly basis as it does not have infrastructure in place to read meters via AMI. In June 2021, District staff met with Master Meter to discuss the installation of AMI throughout the District. Master Meter produced a propagation study and, based on the results, the General Manager recommends that District staff move forward with the installation of AMI throughout the District’s service area. The Phase One Project, which is the scope of work in the current WEEG grant application, will result in the ability to remotely read approximately 24,000 meters (45% of the District’s total meter count). The work to be 3 completed in this phase will consist of the installation of two base stations and seven repeaters at existing District locations, as well as the implementation of a customer engagement portal. A customer engagement portal will allow customers whose meters are included in the first phase to see their reads in real-time, get analytics on their usage as it compares to others in the District, and sign up for various alerts such as high usage or leak notifications. The Phase One Project will begin in July 2022 with substantial completion by December 2023. The cost of this first phase is approximately $400,000.00. If awarded, the USBR would supply 50% of the money needed with the District committed to supply the remainder. Funds for AMI installation have been included in the current six-year Capital Improvement Program (CIP). Additional costs for software licensing or a customer portal will be budgeted in the Fiscal Year 2023 and 2024 Operating Budgets. The District intends to apply again to this program for additional funding of future phases of the project. FISCAL IMPACT: Joseph Beachem, Chief Financial Officer The adoption of Resolution No. 4402 commits the District to providing the minimum 50% funding match specified in the funding plan application if the grant is awarded to the District by USBR. AMI installation is included in the current six-year CIP budget, customer engagement and software fees will be included in the proposed Fiscal Year 2023 and 2024 Operating Budgets. STRATEGIC GOAL: This project supports the District’s Mission Statement, “To provide exceptional water and wastewater service to its customers, and to manage District resources in a transparent and fiscally responsible manner” and the General Manager’s Vision, "To be a model water agency by providing stellar service, achieving measurable results, and continuously improving operational practices." LEGAL IMPACT: None. Attachments: Attachment A – Committee Action Attachment B – Resolution No. 4402 ATTACHMENT A SUBJECT/PROJECT: Adopt Resolution No. 4402 as Required for a Grant Funding Application for the United States Bureau of Reclamation’s WaterSMART: Water and Energy Efficiency Grant Project Funding for Fiscal Year 2022 COMMITTEE ACTION: The Finance & Administration Committee reviewed this item at a meeting held on October 20, 2021, and the following comments were made: • Staff informed the Committee that though the details of subsequent phases are not finalized, this initial phase would allow for approximately 24,000 meters to be read via AMI. Phase two would likely look to convert 4G registers to AMI that require some infrastructure to be built, and phase 3 would look at 3G registers that are in areas that could be picked up via AMI if they were converted to 4G. • In response to an inquiry from the Committee, staff pointed out that moving to AMI would reduce the number of vehicles being deployed daily by one, generating some savings. Other benefits include improved water conservation and energy efficiency that come from having real-time data. • Staff has a meter change out CIP beginning FY 2025 that could potentially incorporate some of the previously mentioned phases. The meter change out CIP would replace older meters that lose accuracy over time by recording slightly less water usage. • The Committee requested a listing of other local water Districts that have transitioned to AMI. Staff noted that Padre Dam has converted all their meters. Olivenhain, Oceanside, City of San Diego, and Valley Center are currently converting to AMI. • Staff clarified that this current phase is not changing out any meters but building infrastructure to allow current 4G meters to be read via AMI. • It was discussed that staff is currently only requesting to apply for the grant. Staff will return to the Board when it is time to discuss procurement, labor costs, and infrastructure costs. • The Committee questioned how the grant consultant would be compensated for working on the grant application. They asked if the consultant would be paid based on a percentage of the amount awarded, if the grant application was successful. Staff informed the Committee that the consultant is working under an as-needed contract. A task order was submitted for the work needed to complete the application, about $28,000. The consultant is paid for completing the grant application and compensation is not contingent upon the District being awarded the grant. Following the discussion, the Committee supported staff’s recommendation and presentation to the full board as an action item. RESOLUTION NO. 4402 A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE OTAY WATER DISTRICT AUTHORIZING WATERSMART: WATER AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY GRANT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022 WHEREAS, the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) is soliciting applications for authorized projects for WaterSMART: Water and Energy Efficiency Grant (Program) funding for Fiscal Year 2022 per Funding Opportunity Announcement No. R22AS00023; and WHEREAS, the Otay Water District has 52,000 active water meters in the system and desires to implement a project to convert a portion of the meters to Advanced Meter Infrastructure; and WHEREAS, The Otay Water District has prepared and submitted a grant application under this Program for Fiscal Year 2022 with an application due date of November 3, 2021; and WHERAS, USBR has directed applicants to include in its application an official resolution adopted by the applicant’s board of directors or governing body verifying 1) the identity of the official with legal authority to enter into an agreement, 2) the board of directors, governing body, or appropriate official who has reviewed and supports the application submitted, 3) the capability of the applicant to provide the amount of funding and/or in-kind contributions specified in the Attachment B funding plan, 4) that the applicant will work with USBR to meet established deadlines for entering into a grant or cooperative agreement. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED as follows: 1. The General Manager or his designee is authorized to submit an application to the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to obtain a WaterSMART: Water and Energy Efficiency Grant (Program) funding for Fiscal Year 2022 per Funding Opportunity Announcement No. R22AS00023; and 2. The General Manager has reviewed and supports the application submitted on or about the 3rd day of November 2021; and 3. The Otay Water District is able to provide the minimum 50% funding match specified in the funding plan for the application; and 4. The Otay Water District’s Customer Service Manager is hereby authorized and directed to prepare the necessary data, conduct investigations, and facilitate the filing such application. 5. The General Manager is authorized to execute a grant agreement with the USBR in association with this application process. 6. The Otay Water District will work with the USBR to meet established deadlines required for entering into a cooperative agreement to obtain the aforementioned grant funding. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the Board of Directors of the Otay Water District at a regular board meeting held this 3rd day of November 2021, by the following roll call vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: ________________________ President ATTEST: ________________________ District Secretary STAFF REPORT TYPE MEETING: Regular Board MEETING DATE: November 3, 2021 SUBMITTED BY: Marissa Dychitan Senior Accountant PROJECT: DIV. NO. All APPROVED BY: Eid Fakhouri, Finance Manager Kevin Koeppen, Assistant Chief of Finance Joseph R. Beachem, Chief Financial Officer Jose Martinez, General Manager SUBJECT: Approve the Audited Financial Statements for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2021 GENERAL MANAGER'S RECOMMENDATION: That the Board approve the Audited Financial Statements (Attachment B)including the Independent Auditors' unqualified opinion, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2021. COMMITTEE ACTION: See Attachment A. PURPOSE: To inform the Board of the significant financial events which occurred during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2021, as reflected in the audited financial statements. ANALYSIS: Teaman, Ramirez & Smith, Inc., performed the audit and found that, in all material respects, the financial statements correctly represent AGENDA ITEM 8c 2 the District's financial position. They found no material errors in the financial records or statements (Attachment D). Total Assets: Total assets increased by $11.9 million or 2.16% during Fiscal Year 2021, to $562.8 million, due to increases in cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, and improved operating results which were partially offset by depreciation. Deferred Outflows & Deferred Inflows: Deferred outflows increased by 3.4 million or 74.77% in Fiscal Year 2021 due primarily to the $1.2 million advance payment to CalPERS and an increase in differences between expected and actuarial experience in Other Post Employee Benefits (OPEB). Deferred inflows decreased by $2.2 million or 60.87% due to the amortization of the positive differences between expected and actuarial experience in Pension and OPEB. Total Liabilities & Net Positions: Total liabilities decreased by approximately $0.3 million from the previous fiscal year to $164.0 million. The decrease is attributable to the annual debt payment of $5.0 million partially offset by increases in the Net Pension and Net OPEB liabilities. The net position increased by $17.8 million or 4.59% to $405.3 million as of June 30, 2021. Capital Contributions: Capital contributions for Fiscal Year 2021 were $11.8 million. Capital contributions consist of developers contributing $7.8 million in capacity fees and $3.2 million in contributed fixed assets; and Caltrans contributes $0.3 million in reimbursements for utility relocations. Ratepayers also paid $0.5 million in availability fees, which are considered a part of capital contributions. Results of Operations: Operating revenues increased by $11.2 million or 11.68%, mainly due to increased water rates and sales volume due to below-average rainfall. The cost of water sales increased by $4.3 million or 6.90% due to increased unit purchase costs and water deliveries. 3 Non-Operating Revenues & Expenses: Non-operating revenues increased by $2.0 million or 18.30% for Fiscal Year 2021 due primarily to the $3.2 million settlement from Metropolitan Water District (MWD) partially offset by a decrease in investment income. Non-operating expenses decreased by $1.6 million or 23.40% due to decreases in the loss on capital asset retirement, interest expense, and CIP expenses that did not qualify as a capital expense. Conclusion: In summary, the overall audit process was a success, and the auditors found no material errors or misstatements in the District's financial statements. Additional Audit Correspondence: As a part of completing the audit engagement, Teaman, Ramirez and Smith, Inc., also provided the following letters summarizing their observations and conclusions concerning the District's overall financial processes: • Management Letter: The auditors did not identify any internal control deficiencies that they considered material weaknesses. (Attachment C). • Audit Committee Letter: This letter describes overall aspects of the audit, including audit principles, performance, dealings with management, and significant findings or issues. There were no transactions entered into by the District during the year for which there was a lack of authoritative guidance or consensus. All significant transactions have been recognized in the financial statements in the proper period. There were no disagreements with management concerning financial accounting, reporting, or auditing matters, and there were no significant difficulties in dealing with management in performing the audit. (Attachment D). • Report on Applying Agreed-Upon Procedures: A review of the District's investment portfolio at year-end and a sample of specific investment transactions completed throughout the fiscal year were performed. There were no exceptions to 4 compliance from the District's Investment Policy. (Attachment E). FISCAL IMPACT: None. STRATEGIC GOAL: The District ensures its continued financial health through long-term financial planning, formalized financial policies, enhanced budget controls, fair pricing, debt planning, and improved financial reporting. LEGAL IMPACT: None. Attachments: A) Committee Action B) Audited Annual Financial Statements C) Management Letter D) Audit Committee Letter E) Report on Applying Agreed-Upon Procedures F) Audit Presentation ATTACHMENT A SUBJECT/PROJECT: Approve the Audited Financial Statements for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2021 COMMITTEE ACTION: The Finance and Administration Committee (Committee) reviewed this item at a meeting held on October 20, 2021, and the following comments were made: • Staff is recommending that the Board approve the District’s Audited Financial Statements, including the Independent Auditors’ unqualified opinion for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2021. • Staff provided a review of the District’s financials for the year ending June 30, 2021. It was indicated that the auditors found no material errors in the financial records or statements and there were no transactions entered into by the District during the year for which there was lack of authoritative guidance or consensus. • Messrs. Joshua Calhoun, Partner, and Rick Gallo, Auditor in Charge, of Teaman Ramirez & Smith, Inc., attended the meeting and provided a review of the audit process and results of the audit: − Mr. Calhoun indicated that his firm will be issuing an “unmodified opinion” or clean opinion on the financial statements. Their issuance of an unmodified report indicates that they found no issues with the financial statements, and they believe the statements are fairly stated. − In response to a question from the Committee, Mr. Calhoun indicated that there were no management comments for fiscal year ended June 30, 2021. • The Committee thanked Mr. Calhoun for his firm’s work on the audit and complimented the Finance staff for the accurate reporting and successful outcome of the audit. Upon completion of the discussion, the Committee supported staff’s recommendation and presentation to the full board as an action item. OTAY WATER DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATEMENTS WITH REPORT ON AUDIT BY INDEPENDENT CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 Attachment B TABLE OF CONTENTS Years Ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 Page Number Independent Auditors’ Report 1 - 2 Management’s Discussion & Analysis 3 - 10 Basic Financial Statements: Statements of Net Position 11 - 12 Statements of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Position 13 Statements of Cash Flows 14 - 15 Notes to Financial Statements 16 - 55 Required Supplementary Information: Schedule of Changes in the Net OPEB Liability and Related Ratios 56 Schedule of Contributions 57 Schedule of Changes in the Net Pension Liability and Related Ratios 58 - 59 Schedule of Plan Contributions 60 ,1'(3(1'(17$8',7256 5(3257   %RDUGRI'LUHFWRUV 2WD\:DWHU'LVWULFW 6SULQJ9DOOH\&DOLIRUQLD   5HSRUWRQWKH)LQDQFLDO6WDWHPHQWV  :HKDYHDXGLWHGWKHDFFRPSDQ\LQJILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVRIWKH2WD\:DWHU'LVWULFW WKH³'LVWULFW´ DVRIDQGIRUWKH\HDUVHQGHG -XQHDQGDQGWKHUHODWHGQRWHVWRWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVZKLFKFROOHFWLYHO\FRPSULVHWKH'LVWULFW¶VEDVLF ILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVDVOLVWHGLQWKHWDEOHRIFRQWHQWV  Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements  0DQDJHPHQWLVUHVSRQVLEOHIRUWKHSUHSDUDWLRQDQGIDLUSUHVHQWDWLRQRIWKHVHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWKDFFRXQWLQJ SULQFLSOHVJHQHUDOO\DFFHSWHGLQWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVRI$PHULFDWKLVLQFOXGHVWKHGHVLJQLPSOHPHQWDWLRQDQGPDLQWHQDQFHRI LQWHUQDOFRQWUROUHOHYDQWWRWKHSUHSDUDWLRQDQGIDLUSUHVHQWDWLRQRIILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVWKDWDUHIUHHIURPPDWHULDOPLVVWDWHPHQW ZKHWKHUGXHWRIUDXGRUHUURU  Auditor’s Responsibility  2XUUHVSRQVLELOLW\LVWRH[SUHVVRSLQLRQVRQWKHVHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVEDVHGRQRXUDXGLW:HFRQGXFWHGRXUDXGLWLQDFFRUGDQFH ZLWKDXGLWLQJVWDQGDUGVJHQHUDOO\DFFHSWHGLQWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVRI$PHULFDDQGWKHVWDQGDUGVDSSOLFDEOHWRILQDQFLDODXGLWV FRQWDLQHGLQGovernment Auditing StandardsLVVXHGE\WKH&RPSWUROOHU*HQHUDORIWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVDQGWKH6WDWH&RQWUROOHU¶V 0LQLPXP$XGLW5HTXLUHPHQWVIRU&DOLIRUQLD6SHFLDO'LVWULFWV7KRVHVWDQGDUGVUHTXLUHWKDWZHSODQDQGSHUIRUPWKHDXGLWWR REWDLQUHDVRQDEOHDVVXUDQFHDERXWZKHWKHUWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVDUHIUHHIURPPDWHULDOPLVVWDWHPHQW  $QDXGLWLQYROYHVSHUIRUPLQJSURFHGXUHVWRREWDLQDXGLWHYLGHQFHDERXWWKHDPRXQWVDQGGLVFORVXUHVLQWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWV 7KHSURFHGXUHVVHOHFWHGGHSHQGRQWKHDXGLWRU¶VMXGJPHQWLQFOXGLQJWKHDVVHVVPHQWRIWKHULVNVRIPDWHULDOPLVVWDWHPHQWRIWKH ILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVZKHWKHUGXHWRIUDXGRUHUURU,QPDNLQJWKRVHULVNDVVHVVPHQWVWKHDXGLWRUFRQVLGHUVLQWHUQDOFRQWURO UHOHYDQWWRWKH'LVWULFW¶VSUHSDUDWLRQDQGIDLUSUHVHQWDWLRQRIWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVLQRUGHUWRGHVLJQDXGLWSURFHGXUHVWKDWDUH DSSURSULDWHLQWKHFLUFXPVWDQFHVEXWQRWIRUWKHSXUSRVHRIH[SUHVVLQJDQRSLQLRQRQWKHHIIHFWLYHQHVVRIWKH'LVWULFW¶VLQWHUQDO FRQWURO$FFRUGLQJO\ZHH[SUHVVQRVXFKRSLQLRQ$QDXGLWDOVRLQFOXGHVHYDOXDWLQJWKHDSSURSULDWHQHVVRIDFFRXQWLQJSROLFLHV XVHG DQG WKH UHDVRQDEOHQHVV RIVLJQLILFDQW DFFRXQWLQJ HVWLPDWHV PDGH E\ PDQDJHPHQW DV ZHOO DV HYDOXDWLQJ WKH RYHUDOO SUHVHQWDWLRQRIWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWV  :HEHOLHYHWKDWWKHDXGLWHYLGHQFHZHKDYHREWDLQHGLVVXIILFLHQWDQGDSSURSULDWHWRSURYLGHDEDVLVIRURXUDXGLWRSLQLRQV  Opinions  ,QRXURSLQLRQWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVUHIHUUHGWRDERYHSUHVHQWIDLUO\LQDOOPDWHULDOUHVSHFWVWKHUHVSHFWLYHILQDQFLDOSRVLWLRQ RIWKH2WD\:DWHU'LVWULFWDVRI-XQHDQGDQGWKHUHVSHFWLYHFKDQJHVLQILQDQFLDOSRVLWLRQDQGFDVKIORZVWKHUHRI IRUWKH\HDUVWKHQHQGHGLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWKDFFRXQWLQJSULQFLSOHVJHQHUDOO\DFFHSWHGLQWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVRI$PHULFDDVZHOODV WKHDFFRXQWLQJV\VWHPVSUHVFULEHGE\WKH&DOLIRUQLD6WDWH&RQWUROOHU¶V2IILFHDQG&DOLIRUQLDUHJXODWLRQVJRYHUQLQJ6SHFLDO 'LVWULFWV Richard A. Teaman, CPA David M. Ramirez, CPA Javier H. Carrillo, CPA Bryan W͘Daugherty, CPA Joshua :͘Calhoun, CPA 4201 Brockton AveŶƵĞ Suite 100Riverside CA 92501 951.274.9500d> 951.274.7828 FAX www.trscpas.com Emphasis of Matters As described in Note 1 to the basic financial statements, as of June 30, 2020, the District adopted the provisions of Governmental Accounting Standards Board Statement No. 95, Postponement of the Effective Dates of Certain Authoritative Guidance. Our opinion is not modified with respect to this matter. Other Matters Required Supplementary Information Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America require that the management's discussion and analysis and required supplementary information on pages 3-10 and 56-60 be presented to supplement the basic financial statements. Such information, although not a part of the basic financial statements, is required by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, who considers it to be an essential part of financial reporting for placing the basic financial statements in an appropriate operational, economic, or historical context. We have applied certain limited procedures to the required supplementary information in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, which consisted of inquiries of management about the methods of preparing the information and comparing the information for consistency with management's responses to our inquiries, the basic financial statements, and other knowledge we obtained during our audit of the basic financial statements. We do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on the information because the limited procedures do not provide us with sufficient evidence to express an opinion or provide any assurance. Other Reporting Required by Government Auditing Standards In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated October 20, 2021, on our consideration of the District’s internal control over financial reporting and on our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the effectiveness of the District’s internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards in considering the District’s internal control over financial reporting and compliance. Riverside, California October 20, 2021 Management’s Discussion and Analysis 3 As the management of the Otay Water District (the "District"), we offer readers of the District's financial statements, this narrative overview, and an analysis of the District's financial performance during the fiscal year ending June 30, 2021. Please read it in conjunction with the District's financial statements that follow Management's Discussion and Analysis. All amounts, unless otherwise indicated, are expressed in millions of dollars. Overview of the Financial Statements This discussion and analysis is intended to serve as an introduction to the District's basic financial statements, which are comprised of the following: 1) Statements of Net Position, 2) Statements of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Position, 3) Statements of Cash Flows, and 4) Notes to the Financial Statements. This report also contains other supplementary information in addition to the basic financial statements. The Statements of Net Position present information on the District's assets, deferred outflows of resources, liabilities, and deferred inflows of resources, with the difference reported as Total Net Position. Over time, increases or decreases in net positions may serve as a valuable indicator of whether the District's financial position is improving or weakening. The Statements of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Position present information showing how the District's net position changed during the most recent fiscal year. All changes in net positions are reported as soon as the underlying event giving rise to the change occurs, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. Thus, revenues and expenses are reported in this statement for some items that will only result in cash flows in future fiscal periods (e.g., uncollected taxes and earned but unused vacation leave). The Statements of Cash Flows present information on cash receipts and payments for the fiscal year. The Notes to the Financial Statements provides additional information essential to a complete understanding of the data supplied in the specific financial statements listed above. Financial Highlights  The assets and deferred outflows of resources of the District exceeded its liabilities and deferred inflows of resources at the close of the most recent fiscal year by $405.3 million (net position). Of this amount, $60.7 million (unrestricted net position) may be used to meet the District’s ongoing obligations to residents and creditors.  Total assets increased by $11.9 million or 2.16% during Fiscal Year 2021, to $562.8 million, due to increases in cash and cash equivalents and receivables which were partially offset by a decrease in capital assets from depreciation exceeding current year additions. Management’s Discussion and Analysis 4 In addition to the basic financial statements and accompanying notes, this report also presents certain required supplementary information concerning the District's progress in funding its obligation to provide retirement benefits to its employees. Financial Analysis: As noted, net position may serve, over time, as a valuable indicator of an entity's financial position. In the case of the District, assets and deferred outflows of resources exceeded liabilities and deferred inflows of resources by $405.3 million at the close of Fiscal Year 2021. The largest portion of the District's net position, $340.4 million (84%), reflects its investment in capital assets, plus unused debt proceeds, less any remaining outstanding debt used to acquire those capital assets. The District uses these capital assets to provide services to customers; consequently, these assets are not available for future spending. Although the District's investment in its capital assets is reported effectively as a resource, it should be noted that the resources needed to repay the debt must be provided from other sources, since the capital assets themselves cannot be used to liquidate these liabilities. Management’s Discussion and Analysis 5 Statements of Net Position (In Millions of Dollars) 2021 2020 2019 Assets Current and Other Assets $ 111.2 $ 94.4 $ 89.7 Capital Assets 451.6 456.5 458.3 Total Assets 562.8 550.9 548.0 Deferred Outflows of Resources Deferred Actuarial Pension Costs 5.4 3.4 39.0 Deferred Actuarial OPEB Costs 2.5 1.1 2.2 Total Deferred Outflows of Resources 7.9 4.5 41.2 Liabilities Long-Term Debt Outstanding 106.2 112.0 114.3 Net Pension Liability 20.0 16.6 48.4 Net OPEB Liability 1.8 0.0 3.4 Other Liabilities 36.0 35.7 33.8 Total Liabilities 164.0 164.3 199.9 Deferred Inflows of Resources Deferred Actuarial Pension Costs 0.0 1.3 1.2 Deferred Actuarial OPEB Costs 1.4 2.3 0.5 Total Deferred Inflows of Resources 1.4 3.6 1.7 Net Position Net Investment in Capital Assets 340.4 345.2 354.6 Restricted for Debt Service 4.2 4.3 4.3 Unrestricted 60.7 38.0 28.7 Total Net Position $ 405.3 $ 387.5 $ 387.6 The District's operations and population are growing. Much of this expansion has occurred in the residential sector, particularly in multi-family dwellings and commercial areas. By 2045, the District's service area population is expected to increase by 21% to 272,350 residents. The District has created several future planning documents to ensure a reliable water supply and sewer system in the future, including the maintenance of current infrastructure. In FY 2021, the District's Capital Assets increased by $10.7 million before accumulated depreciation. (See Note 4 in the Notes to Financial Statements). The District also saw a decrease in long-term debt of $5.8 million (excluding current maturities) due to annual debt service payments (See Note 5 in the Notes to Financial Statements). Management’s Discussion and Analysis 6 Deferred outflows of resources increased by $3.4 million in FY 2021 due to additional funding of $1.2 million to CalPERS, an increase of $1.0 million on the net difference between projected and actual earnings for the pension, a $1.0 million increase in the OPEB differences between expected and actual experience, and a $0.2 million increase in FY 2021 PERS Unfunded Actuarial Liability (UAL). The $36.7 million decrease of deferred outflows in FY 2020 was due to the $31.8 million additional funding to CalPERS and the $2.4 million decrease in FY 2020 PERS Unfunded Actuarial Liability (UAL). At the end of FY 2021, the District can report positive balances in all net position categories. This situation also applies to the prior two fiscal years. Statements of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Position (In Millions of Dollars) 2021 2020 2019 Water Sales $ 101.7 $ 90.4 $ 86.8 Wastewater Revenue 2.9 2.9 3.0 Connection and Other Fees 2.5 2.6 2.2 Non-operating Revenues 12.9 10.9 11.5 Total Revenues 120.0 106.8 103.5 Depreciation Expense 17.2 16.8 16.8 Other Operating Expenses 91.5 90.2 86.9 Non-operating Expenses 5.3 6.9 9.2 Total Expenses 114.0 113.9 112.9 Income (Loss) Before Capital Contributions 6.0 (7.1) (9.4) Capital Contributions 11.8 7.0 9.5 Change in Net Position 17.8 (0.1) 0.1 Beginning Net Position 387.5 387.6 387.5 Ending Net Position $ 405.3 $ 387.5 $ 387.6 Water Sales increased by $11.3 million and $3.6 million in FY 2021 and FY 2020, respectively, due to an increase in units sold, as a result of below-average rainfall, and higher water rates. Other Operating Expenses increased by $1.3 million and $3.3 million in FY 2021 and FY 2020, respectively, predominantly due to the increases in water units purchased as a result of increases in water sales volumes. The increase in FY 2021, is partially offset by the credit received from the City of San Diego as a result of a reduction in the contractual recycled water volumes due to the City’s plant being shut down. Management’s Discussion and Analysis 7 Specific planning and environmental study costs associated with capital projects do not qualify as capital costs under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. These costs are included in the District's miscellaneous (non- operating) expenses. For FY 2021 and FY 2020, those expenses were $0.2 million and $0.4 million, respectively. Connection and Other Fees decreased by $0.1 million in FY 2021 and increased by $0.4 million in FY 2020. Capital Contributions increased by $4.8 million in FY 2021 due to high demand in the housing market and decreased by $2.5 million in FY 2020 due to the slowdown in housing development. Non-operating Revenues Non-operating Revenues by Major Source (In Millions of Dollars) 2021 2020 2019 Taxes and Assessments $ 5.3 $ 4.9 $ 4.7 Rents and Leases 1.6 1.5 1.4 Other Non-operating Revenue 6.0 4.5 5.5 Total Non-operating Revenues $ 12.9 $ 10.9 $ 11.6 The District's total non-operating revenues increased by $2.0 million in FY 2021 due primarily to the $3.2 million settlement from Metropolitan Water District (MWD) partially offset by a decrease in investment earnings. Total non-operating revenues decreased by $0.7 million in FY 2020 due primarily to decreases in investment earnings and transfer of capacity revenue from capital contribution to fund project expenditures that do not qualify as capital assets. Capital Assets and Debt Administration The District's capital assets (net of accumulated depreciation) as of June 30, 2021, totaled $451.6 million. Included in this amount is land, which is a non-depreciable asset. The District's net capital assets decreased by 1.07% and 0.39% in FY 2021 and FY 2020, respectively. Management’s Discussion and Analysis 8 Capital Assets (In Millions of Dollars) As indicated by the figures in the table above, most capital assets added during both fiscal years were related to the water and wastewater systems. Additionally, the majority of the cost of construction-in-progress is also associated with water systems. Additional information on the District's capital assets can be found in Note 4 of the Notes to Financial Statements. In November 2018, the District issued $32.4 million in Water Revenue Bonds, Series 2018 to provide funds for the construction of water storage, treatment, transmission facilities, and advance refunded $6.9 million of the 1996 Certificates of Participation. As of June 30, 2021, approximately $0.3 million of the 2018 Water Revenue Bond proceeds remain in Restricted Cash and Cash Equivalents. In December 2019, the District issued $3.1 million in Wastewater Revenue Bonds to fund specific capital improvements made to the District's wastewater system. As of June 30, 2020, all the bond proceeds were used to pay for the construction cost of the wastewater main replacement at Campo Road. On June 30, 2021, the District had $106.2 million in outstanding debt (net of $5.3 million of maturities occurring in FY 2022), which consisted of the following: General Obligation Bonds $ 0.7 Revenue Bonds 105.5 Total Long-Term Debt $ 106.2 Additional information on the District's long-term debt can be found in Note 5 of the Notes to Financial Statements. 2021 2020 2019 Land $ 14.4 $ 14.4 $ 14.4 Construction in Progress 25.8 24.7 33.2 Potable Water System 506.7 498.1 488.8 Recycled Water System 116.6 115.5 114.8 Wastewater System 59.1 59.1 48.5 Field Equipment 8.1 8.4 8.6 Buildings 19.6 19.5 19.2 Transportation Equipment 3.8 3.6 3.5 Communication Equipment 2.8 2.7 3.4 Office Equipment 16.3 16.5 16.8 Total Capital Assets 773.2 762.5 751.2 Less Accumulated Depreciation (321.6) (306.0) (292.9) Net Capital Assets $ 451.6 $ 456.5 $ 458.3 Management’s Discussion and Analysis 9 Fiscal Year 2021-2022 Budget Economic Factors The San Diego region imports 80% of its potable supply, therefore, factors such as local rainfall and weather conditions elsewhere in the western portion of the nation can affect the region. San Diego received below-average rainfall of 4.93 inches in FY 2021. The 10-year average of 9.00 inches for San Diego rainfall reflects the long-term drought conditions for our area. San Diego's rainfall average over 20 years is 9.01 inches; the 30-year average is 9.65 inches, and the 40-year average is 9.92 inches. While water sales peaked around 2008, conservation has permanently impacted volumes. Prolonged droughts have resulted in additional conservation, further impacting volumes. Below-average rainfall has led to potable water sales volume increasing by 10.7% in FY 2021, while above-average rainfall has led to potable water sales volume increasing by only 0.6% in FY 2020. The FY 2021 budget was prepared assuming that the pandemic would adversely impact potable and recycled water sales volumes by 12% and 15%, respectively. In FY 2021, the actual water volumes did not experience the pandemic-driven declines anticipated in the budget. Therefore, the FY 2022 budget was prepared assuming the water volumes would be consistent with actual historical volumes and excluding the adverse impacts included in the FY 2021 budget. The FY 2022 sales volume is anticipated to increase 15.0% compared to the previous year's budget and decrease 6.7% versus FY 2021 actual sales volume. The District continues to respond to the challenges presented by growth, State mandates, and the potential of drought by creating new opportunities and new organizational efficiencies. Utilizing and refining its Strategic Business Plan has captured the Board of Director's vision and united its staff in a joint mission. The District has achieved several significant accomplishments due to its successful adherence to its Strategic Business Plan. The District is poised to continue successfully providing an affordable, safe, and reliable water supply for the people of its service area, and set to reap the rewards of greater efficiencies and economies of scale. The District is currently at about 69% of its projected ultimate population, serving approximately 226,000 people. Long-term, this percentage should continue to increase as the District's service area develops and grows. By 2045, the District is projected to serve approximately 272,400 people, with an average daily demand of 46 million gallons per day (MGD) compared to the current average daily demand of 26.5 million gallons per day (MGD). Currently, the District services the needs of this growing population by purchasing water from the San Diego County Water Authority (CWA), who in turn purchases its water from the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) and the Imperial Irrigation District (IID). Otay takes delivery of the water through several connections of large diameter pipelines owned and operated by CWA. The District currently receives treated water from CWA directly and from the Helix Water District via a CWA contract. Also, the District has an emergency agreement with the City of San Diego to purchase water in the case of a shutdown of the primary treated water source. The City of San Diego also has a long-term contract with the District to provide recycled water for landscape and irrigation usage. Through innovative agreements like these, both parties can benefit by using another agency's excess capacity and diversifying local supply, thereby increasing reliability. Management’s Discussion and Analysis 10 Financial The District is budgeted to deliver approximately 27,002 acre-feet of potable water to 51,316 potable customer accounts during FY 2021-2022. Management feels that these projections are realistic after accounting for low growth, supply changes, conservation, and the economic impacts of COVID-19. A combination of factors, including weather patterns and the economic uncertainty brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, have created challenges in developing projections for the current fiscal year. Unemployment is expected to fall by the end of the year. The housing market is expected to be high. An increase in consumer goods demand is expected due to the Federal government's assistance programs. District staff projects that the District will sell another 1,694 meters over the next six years, translating to 2,905 equivalent dwelling units (EDUs). This growth is estimated to increase sales volumes by an average of less than 1% per year over the next five years. While all these factors impact the region's water usage, people's water needs remain an underlying constant. Management is unaware of any other conditions that are likely to significantly impact the District's current financial position, net position, or operating results. Contacting the District's Financial Management This financial report is designed to provide a general overview of the Otay Water District's finances for the Board of Directors, customers, creditors, and other interested parties. Questions concerning any of the information provided in the report or requests for additional information should be addressed to the District's Finance Department, 2554 Sweetwater Springs Blvd., Spring Valley, CA 91978-2004. 2021 2020 ASSETS Current Assets: Cash and Cash Equivalents (Notes 1 and 2) 84,818,274$ 65,089,488$ Board Designated Cash and Cash Equivalents (Notes 1 and 2) 3,092,512 2,598,569 Restricted Cash and Cash Equivalents (Notes 1 and 2) 816,218 6,077,597 Restricted Investments (Notes 1 and 2) 3,666,097 3,740,520 Accounts Receivable, Net 14,840,937 13,420,104 Accrued Interest Receivable 144,169 260,735 Taxes and Availability Charges Receivable, Net 252,183 178,777 Restricted Taxes and Availability Charges Receivable, Net 21,170 75,263 Inventories 855,563 942,564 Prepaid Items and Other Receivables 2,710,237 2,003,970 Total Current Assets 111,217,360 94,387,587 Non-current Assets: Net OPEB Asset (Note 8) - 20,021 Capital Assets (Note 4): Land 14,423,773 14,423,773 Construction in Progress 25,786,352 24,711,844 Capital Assets, Net of Depreciation 411,352,279 417,367,132 Total Capital Assets, Net of Depreciation 451,562,404 456,502,749 Total Non-current Assets 451,562,404 456,522,770 Total Assets 562,779,764 550,910,357 DEFERRED OUTFLOWS OF RESOURCES Deferred Actuarial Pension Costs (Note 7) 5,421,523 3,358,365 Deferred Actuarial OPEB Costs (Note 8) 2,439,632 1,139,535 Total Deferred Outflows of Resources 7,861,155$ 4,497,900$ Continued STATEMENTS OF NET POSITION JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020 The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement.11 2021 2020 LIABILITIES Current Liabilities: Current Maturities of Long-term Debt (Note 5) 5,250,000$ 4,955,000$ Accounts Payable 14,735,726 16,224,117 Accrued Payroll Liabilities 910,173 811,521 Other Accrued Liabilities 4,985,693 4,644,505 Customer and Developer Deposits 4,480,951 3,673,975 Accrued Interest 1,722,189 1,790,955 Unearned Revenues - 57,024 Liabilities Payable from Restricted Assets: Restricted Accrued Interest 19,000 28,067 Total Current Liabilities 32,103,732 32,185,164 Non-current Liabilities: Long-term Debt (Note 5): General Obligation Bonds 739,080 1,460,435 Revenue Bonds 105,484,807 110,487,562 Net Pension Liability 20,043,519 16,616,855 Net OPEB Liability 1,801,159 - Other Non-current Liabilities 3,793,011 3,550,571 Total Non-current Liabilities 131,861,576 132,115,423 Total Liabilities 163,965,308 164,300,587 DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES Deferred Actuarial Pension Costs (Note 7) - 1,366,658 Deferred Actuarial OPEB Costs (Note 8) 1,424,536 2,274,249 Total Deferred Inflows of Resources 1,424,536 3,640,907 NET POSITION Net Investment in Capital Assets 340,383,389 345,156,470 Restricted for Debt Service 4,187,443 4,261,399 Unrestricted 60,680,243 38,048,894 Total Net Position 405,251,075$ 387,466,763$ STATEMENTS OF NET POSITION - CONTINUED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020 The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement.12 2021 2020 OPERATING REVENUES Water Sales 101,742,970$ 90,435,148$ Wastewater Revenue 2,899,180 2,921,310 Connection and Other Fees 2,498,318 2,582,351 Total Operating Revenues 107,140,468 95,938,809 OPERATING EXPENSES Cost of Water Sales 66,889,570 62,573,257 Wastewater 2,633,413 2,439,117 Administrative and General 21,948,435 25,196,555 Depreciation 17,212,905 16,778,967 Total Operating Expenses 108,684,323 106,987,896 Operating Income (Loss) (1,543,855) (11,049,087) NON-OPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES) Investment Earnings 254,668 1,784,834 Taxes and Assessments 5,251,540 4,939,950 Availability Charges 686,697 694,768 Gain (Loss) on Disposal of Capital Assets (159,734) (1,243,742) Rents and Leases 1,587,687 1,501,328 Miscellaneous Revenues 5,062,779 1,936,162 Donations (84,389) (121,600) Interest Expense (4,782,490) (4,953,987) Miscellaneous Expenses (241,379) (558,405) Total Non-operating Revenues (Expenses) 7,575,379 3,979,308 Income (Loss) Before Capital Contributions 6,031,524 (7,069,779) Capital Contributions 11,752,788 6,941,932 Change in Net Position 17,784,312 (127,847) Total Net Position, Beginning 387,466,763 387,594,610 Total Net Position, Ending 405,251,075$ 387,466,763$ STATEMENTS OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN NET POSITION FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020 The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement. 13 2021 2020 CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from Customers 104,028,293$ 91,797,189$ Receipts from Connections and Other Fees 2,498,318 2,582,351 Receipts from Property Rents and Leases 1,587,687 1,501,328 Other Receipts 5,005,755 1,857,963 Payments to Suppliers (70,598,225) (64,513,739) Payments to Employees (22,630,352) (21,233,287) Other Payments (325,768) (680,005) Net Cash Provided By (Used For) Operating Activities 19,565,708 11,311,800 CASH FLOWS FROM NONCAPITAL AND RELATED FINANCING ACTIVITIES Receipts from Taxes and Assessments 5,170,067 4,890,815 Net Cash Provided By (Used For) Noncapital and Related Financing Activities 5,170,067 4,890,815 CASH FLOWS FROM CAPITAL AND RELATED FINANCING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from Capital Contributions 8,560,257 5,223,069 Proceeds from Sale of Capital Assets 24,748 139,965 Proceeds from Debt Related Taxes and Assessments 748,857 715,136 Proceeds from Long-Term Debt - 3,106,320 Principal Payments on Long-Term Debt (4,955,000) (4,725,000) Interest Payments and Fees (5,334,433) (5,472,280) Acquisition and Construction of Capital Assets (9,264,511) (14,637,213) Net Cash Provided By (Used For) Capital and Related Financing Activities (10,220,082) (15,650,003) CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Interest Received on Investments 371,234 1,865,617 Proceeds from Sale and Maturities of Investments 170,315 25,918,767 Purchase of Investments (95,892) (7,709,647) Net Cash Provided By (Used For) Investing Activities 445,657 20,074,737 Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents 14,961,350 20,627,349 Cash and Cash Equivalents - Beginning 73,765,654 53,138,305 Cash and Cash Equivalents - Ending 88,727,004$ 73,765,654$ Continued STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020 The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement.14 2021 2020 Reconciliation of Operating Income (Loss) to Net Cash Flows Provided By (Used For) Operating Activities: Operating Income (Loss) (1,543,855)$ (11,049,087)$ Adjustments to Reconcile Operating Income to Net Cash Provided By (Used For) Operating Activities: Depreciation 17,212,905 16,778,967 Receipts from Property Rents and Leases 1,587,687 1,501,328 Miscellaneous Revenues 5,005,755 1,857,963 Miscellaneous Expenses and Donations (325,768) (680,005) (Increase) Decrease in Accounts Receivable (1,420,833) (1,632,150) (Increase) Decrease in Inventory 87,001 (167,018) (Increase) Decrease in Prepaid Items and Other Receivables (706,267) (510,139) (Increase) Decrease in Net OPEB Asset 20,021 (20,021) (Increase) Decrease in Deferred Actuarial Pension Costs (2,063,158) 35,664,453 (Increase) Decrease in Deferred Actuarial OPEB Costs (1,300,097) 1,070,039 Increase (Decrease) in Accounts Payable (1,488,391) 2,162,293 Increase (Decrease) in Accrued Payroll and Related Expenses 98,652 172,274 Increase (Decrease) in Other Accrued Liabilities 341,188 (874,754) Increase (Decrease) in Customer and Developer Deposits 806,976 72,881 Increase (Decrease) in Other Non-current Liabilities 242,440 212,897 Increase (Decrease) in Net OPEB Liability 1,801,159 (3,415,025) Increase (Decrease) in Net Pension Liability 3,426,664 (31,772,051) Increase (Decrease) in Deferred Actuarial Pension Costs (1,366,658) 209,483 Increase (Decrease) in Deferred Actuarial OPEB Costs (849,713) 1,729,472 Net Cash Provided By (Used For) Operating Activities 19,565,708$ 11,311,800$ Schedule of Cash and Cash Equivalents: Current Assets: Cash and Cash Equivalents 84,818,274$ 65,089,488$ Board Designated Cash and Cash Equivalents 3,092,512 2,598,569 Restricted Cash and Cash Equivalents 816,218 6,077,597 Total Cash and Cash Equivalents 88,727,004$ 73,765,654$ Supplemental Disclosures Non-Cash Investing and Financing Activities Consisted of the Following: Contributed Capital for Water and Sewer System 3,192,531$ 1,718,863$ Change in Fair Value of Investments and Recognized Gains/Losses 360,636 (432,728) Amortization Related to Long-term Debt 474,110 474,340 STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS - CONTINUED FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020 The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement.15 16 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 NOTE DESCRIPTION PAGE 1 Reporting Entity and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies..……….. 17 - 24 2 Cash and Investments………………………………………………………... 24 - 29 3 Fair Value Measurements…………………………………………..………... 29 - 30 4 Capital Assets…………………………………………………..……………. 31 - 32 5 Long-Term Debt………………………………………………….…………. 33 - 38 6 Net Position………………………………………………………………….. 38 7 Defined Benefit Pension Plan……………………………………………….. 38 - 45 8 Other Post Employment Benefits………………………..…………............... 45 - 50 9 Commitments and Contingencies……………………………………………. 50 - 51 10 Risk Management……………………………………………………………. 52 11 Segment Information………………………………………………..……….. 52 - 55 17 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 1) REPORTING ENTITY AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES A) Reporting Entity The reporting entity Otay Water District (the “District”) includes the accounts of the District, Otay Service Corporation (the “Corporation”) and the Otay Water District Financing Authority (the “Financing Authority”). The Otay Water District (the “District”) is a public entity established in 1956 pursuant to the Municipal Water District Law of 1911 (Section 711 et. Seq. of the California Water Code) for the purpose of providing water and wastewater services to the properties in the District. The District is governed by a Board of Directors consisting of five directors elected by geographical divisions based on District population for a four-year alternating term. The District formed the Otay Service Corporation on June 21, 1993, a nonprofit public benefit corporation duly organized and existing under the laws of the State of California. The Service Corporation was formed to assist the District in the financing of public capital improvements. On March 3, 2021, the Otay Service Corporation was dissolved by the District. The District formed the Financing Authority on March 3, 2010 under the Joint Exercise of Powers Act, constituting Articles 1 through 4 (commencing with Section 6500) of Chapter 5, Division 7, Title 1 of the California Government Code. The Financing Authority was formed to assist the District in the financing of public capital improvements. The financial statements present the District and its component units. The District is the primary government unit. Component units are those entities which are financially accountable to the primary government, either because the District appoints a voting majority of the component unit’s board, or because the component units will provide a financial benefit or impose a financial burden on the District. The District has accounted for the Service Corporation and Financing Authority as “blended” component units. Despite being legally separate, the Service Corporation and Financing Authority are so intertwined with the District that they are in substance, part of the District’s operations. Accordingly, the balances and transactions of these component units are reported within the funds of the District. Separate financial statements are not issued for the Service Corporation and the Financing Authority. B) Measurement Focus, Basis of Accounting and Financial Statement Presentation Measurement focus is a term used to describe “which” transactions are recorded within the various financial statements. Basis of accounting refers to “when” transactions are recorded regardless of the measurement focus applied. The accompanying financial statements are reported using the economic resources measurement focus, and the accrual basis of accounting. Under the economic measurement focus all assets and liabilities (whether current or noncurrent) associated with these activities are included on the Statements of Net Position. The Statements of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Position present increases (revenues) and decreases (expenses) in total net position. Under the accrual basis of accounting, revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded when a liability is incurred, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. The District reports its activities as an enterprise fund, which is used to account for operations that are financed and operated in a manner similar to a private business enterprise, where the intent of the District is that the costs (including depreciation) of providing goods or services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges. 18 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 1) REPORTING ENTITY AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - Continued B) Measurement Focus, Basis of Accounting and Financial Statement Presentation - Continued The basic financial statements of the Otay Water District have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) is the accepted standard setting body for governmental accounting financial reporting purposes. Net position of the District is classified into three components: (1) net investment in capital assets, (2) restricted net position, and (3) unrestricted net position. These classifications are defined as follows: Net Investment in Capital Assets This component of net position consists of capital assets, net of accumulated depreciation and reduced by the outstanding balances of notes or borrowing that are attributable to the acquisition of the assets, construction, or improvement of those assets. If there are significant unspent related debt proceeds at year-end, the portion of the debt attributable to the unspent proceeds are not included in the calculation of the net investment in capital assets. Restricted Net Position This component of net position consists of net position with constrained use through external constraints imposed by creditors (such as through debt covenants), grantors, contributions, or laws or regulations of other governments or constraints imposed by law through constitutional provisions or enabling legislation. Unrestricted Net Position This component of net position consists of net position that do not meet the definition of “net investment in capital assets” or “restricted net position”. The District distinguishes operating revenues and expenses from those revenues and expenses that are non-operating. Operating revenues are those revenues that are generated by water sales and wastewater services while operating expenses pertain directly to the furnishing of those services. Non-operating revenues and expenses are those revenues and expenses generated that are not associated with the normal business of supplying water and wastewater treatment services. The District recognizes revenues from water sales, wastewater revenues, and meter fees as they are earned. Taxes and assessments are recognized as revenues based upon amounts reported to the District by the County of San Diego, net of allowance for delinquencies of $30,373 at June 30, 2021 and $28,227 at June 30, 2020. Additionally, capacity fee contributions received which are related to specific operating expenses are offset against those expenses and included in Cost of Water Sales in the Statements of Revenues and Expenses and Changes in Net Position. Sometimes the District will fund outlays for a particular purpose from both restricted (e.g., restricted bond or grant proceeds) and unrestricted resources. In order to calculate the amounts to report as restricted - net position and unrestricted - net position, a flow assumption must be made about the order in which the resources are considered to be applied. 19 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 1) REPORTING ENTITY AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - Continued B) Measurement Focus, Basis of Accounting and Financial Statement Presentation - Continued It is the District’s practice to consider restricted - net position to have been depleted before unrestricted - net position is applied, however it is at the Board’s discretion. C) New Accounting Pronouncements Implemented as of June 30, 2021 Governmental Accounting Standard Board Statement No. 84 In January of 2017, GASB issued Statement No. 84, Fiduciary Activities. This Statement was issued to improve guidance regarding the identification of fiduciary activities for accounting and financial reporting purposes. This Statement establishes the criteria for identifying fiduciary activities which should be reported in a fiduciary fund in the basic financial statements. The fiduciary funds that should be reported, if applicable: a) pensions trust funds, b) investment trust funds, c) private purpose trust funds, d) custodial funds. Statement No. 84 is effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, GASB No. 95 delayed the implementation of this GASB Statement by one year for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Currently, this Statement has no effect on the District’s financial statements. Governmental Accounting Standard Board Statement No. 90 In August of 2018, GASB issued Statement No. 90, Majority Equity Interests, an amendment of GASB Statements No. 14 and No. 61. This Statement was issued to improve the consistency and comparability of reporting a government's majority equity interest in a legally separate organization and to improve the relevance of financial statement information for certain component units. This Statement defines a majority equity interest and specifies that a majority equity interest in a legally separate organization should be reported as an investment if a government's holding of the equity interest meets the definition of an investment. A majority equity interest that meets the definition of an investment should be measured using the equity method, unless it is held by a special- purpose government engaged only in fiduciary activities, a fiduciary fund, or an endowment (including permanent and term endowments) or permanent fund. Those governments and funds should measure the majority equity interest at fair value. Statement No. 90 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, GASB No. 95 delayed the implementation of this Statement by one year for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Currently, this Statement has no effect on the District’s financial statements. Implemented as of June 30, 2020 Governmental Accounting Standard Board Statement No. 95 In May of 2020, GASB issued Statement No. 95, Postponement of the Effective Dates of Certain Authoritative Guidance. The objective of this statement is to provide temporary relief to governments and other stakeholders in light of the COVID-19 pandemic by postponing the effective dates of certain provisions in Statements and Implementation Guides which are as follows: 20 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 1)REPORTING ENTITY AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - Continued C)New Accounting Pronouncements - Continued Implemented as of June 30, 2020 - Continued Governmental Accounting Standard Board Statement No. 95 - Continued a.GASB Statement 83 - Reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2019.b.GASB Statement 84 and Implementation Guide 2019-2 - Reporting periods beginning after December 15,2019.c.GASB Statement 87 and Implementation Guide 2019-3 - Fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2021, and allreporting periods thereafter.d.GASB Statement 88 - Reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2019.e.GASB Statement 89 - Reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2020.f.GASB Statement 90 - Reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019.g.GASB Statement 91 - Reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2021.h.GASB Statement 92, paragraphs 6 and 7 - Fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2021.i.GASB Statement 92, paragraphs 8, 9, and 12 - Reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2021.j.GASB Statement 92, paragraph 10 - Government acquisitions occurring in reporting periods beginningafter June 15, 2021.k.GASB Statement 93, paragraphs 13 and 14 - Fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2021, and all reportingperiods thereafter.l.Implementation Guide 2017-3, Questions 4.484 and 4.491 - The first reporting period in which themeasurement date of the (collective) net OPEB liability is on or after June 15, 2019.m.Implementation Guide 2017-3, Questions 4.85, 4.103, 4.108, 4.109, 4.225, 4.239, 4.244, 4.245, and 5.1-5.4- Actuarial valuations as of December 15, 2018, or later.n.Implementation Guide 2018-1 - Reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2019.o.Implementation Guide 2019-1- Reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2020. GASB Statement No. 95 is effective immediately. The District has elected to delay certain provisions in the GASB Statements as allowed by GASB Statement No. 95. GASB Statements Nos. 83, 88 and 89 were implemented by the District in fiscal year 2019. Pending Accounting Standards GASB has issued the following statements which impact the District’s financial reporting requirements in the future: i.GASB Statement 87 - “Leases”, effective for fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2021*.ii.GASB Statement 91 - “Conduit Debt Obligations”, effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15,2021*.iii.GASB Statement 92 - “Omnibus 2020”, effective for reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2021*.iv.GASB Statement 93 - “Replacement of Interbank Offered Rates”, effective for reporting periods beginningafter June 15, 2021*.v.GASB Statement 94 - “Public-Private and Public-Public Partnerships and Availability Payment Arrangements”, effective for reporting periods beginning after June 15, 2022.vi.GASB Statement 96 - “Subscription-Based Information Technology Arrangements”, effective for reportingperiods beginning after June 15, 2022.vii.GASB Statement 97 - “Certain Component Unit Criteria, and Accounting and Financial Reporting for Internal Revenue Code Section 457 Deferred Compensation Plans”, effective for reporting periodsbeginning after June 15, 2021. *These GASB Statements original effective dates were postponed by GASB Statement No. 95. 21 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 1) REPORTING ENTITY AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - Continued D) Deferred Outflows / Inflows of Resources In addition to assets, the Statements of Net Position will sometimes report a separate section for deferred outflows of resources. This separate financial statement element, deferred outflows of resources, represents a consumption of net position that applies to a future period(s) and so will not be recognized as an outflow of resources (expense/expenditure) until then. The District has two items that qualify for reporting in this category, deferred actuarial pension costs and deferred actuarial OPEB costs are items that are deferred and recognized as an outflow of resources in the period the amounts become available. In addition to liabilities, the Statements of Net Position will sometimes report a separate section for deferred inflows of resources. This separate financial statement element, deferred inflows of resources, represents an acquisition of net position that applies to a future period(s) and will not be recognized as an inflow of resources (revenue) until that time. The District has two items that qualify for reporting in this category. Accordingly, the items, deferred actuarial pension costs and deferred actuarial OPEB costs, are deferred and recognized as an inflow of resources in the period that the amounts become available. E) Statements of Cash Flows For purposes of the Statements of Cash Flows, the District considers all highly liquid investments (including restricted assets) with a maturity period, at purchase, of three months or less to be cash equivalents. F) Investments Investments are stated at their fair value, which represents the quoted or stated market value. Investments that are not traded on a market, such as investments in external pools, are valued based on the stated fair value as represented by the external pool. All investments are stated at their fair value. The District has not elected to report certain investments at amortized costs. G) Inventory and Prepaid Items Inventory consists primarily of materials used in the construction and maintenance of the water and wastewater system and is valued at weighted average cost. Both inventory and prepaid items use the consumption method whereby they are reported as an asset and expensed as they are consumed. H) Capital Assets Capital assets are recorded at cost, where historical records are available, and at an estimated historical cost where no historical records exist. Infrastructure assets in excess of $20,000 and other capital assets in excess of $10,000 are capitalized if they have an expected useful life of two years or more. The District will also capitalize individual purchases under the capitalization threshold if they are part of a new capital program. The cost of purchased and self- constructed additions to utility plant and major replacements of property are capitalized. Costs include materials, direct labor, transportation, and such indirect items as engineering, supervision, employee fringe benefits and overhead. Repairs, maintenance, and minor replacements of property are charged to expense. Donated assets are capitalized at their acquisition value on the date contributed. 22 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 1) REPORTING ENTITY AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - Continued H) Capital Assets - Continued Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method over the following estimated useful lives: Water System 15-70 Years Field Equipment 2-50 Years Buildings 30-50 Years Communication Equipment 2-10 Years Transportation Equipment 2-7 Years Office Equipment 2-10 Years Recycled Water System 50-75 Years Wastewater System 25-50 Years I) Other Non-current Liabilities For compensated absences, the District’s policy to record vested or accumulated vacation and sick leave as an expense and liability as benefits accrue to employees. June 30, 2021 Beginning Ending Due Within Balance Additions Reductions Balance One Year Compensated Absences $ 3,246,272 $ 1,657,775 $ 1,394,886 $ 3,509,161 $ 350,916 Customer Credits 272,282 5,840 - 278,122 - Reimbursement Agreements 356,644 - - 356,644 - Total $ 3,875,198 $ 1,663,615 $ 1,394,886 $ 4,143,927 $ 350,916 Current portion is reflected in accrued payroll liabilities and remainder in other non-current liabilities on the Statements of Net Position. June 30, 2020 Beginning Ending Due Within Balance Additions Reductions Balance One Year Compensated Absences $ 3,011,855 $ 1,644,010 $ 1,409,593 $ 3,246,272 $ 324,627 Customer Credits 270,360 1,922 - 272,282 - Reimbursement Agreements 356,644 - - 356,644 - Total $ 3,638,859 $ 1,645,932 $ 1,409,593 $ 3,875,198 $ 324,627 Current portion is reflected in accrued payroll liabilities and remainder in other non-current liabilities on the Statements of Net Position. 23 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 1) REPORTING ENTITY AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - Continued J) Classification of Liabilities Certain current liabilities have been classified as current liabilities payable from restricted assets as they will be funded from restricted assets. K) Allowance for Doubtful Accounts The District charges doubtful accounts arising from water sales receivable to bad debt expense when it is probable that the accounts will be uncollectible. Uncollectible accounts are determined by the allowance method based upon prior experience and management’s assessment of the collectability of existing specific accounts. The allowance for doubtful accounts was $342,527 for 2021 and $201,152 for 2020. L) Property Taxes Tax levies are limited to 1% of full market value (at time of purchase) which results in a tax rate of $1.00 per $100 assessed valuation, under the provisions of Proposition 13. Tax rates for voter-approved indebtedness are excluded from this limitation. The County of San Diego (the “County”) bills and collects property taxes on behalf of the District. The County’s tax calendar year is July 1 to June 30. Property taxes attach as a lien on property on January 1. Taxes are levied on July 1 and are payable in two equal installments on November 1 and February 1, and become delinquent after December 10 and April 10, respectively. M) Pensions For purposes of measuring the net pension liability and deferred outflows/inflows of resources related to pensions, and pension expense, information about the fiduciary net position of the District’s California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) plans (Plans) and additions to/deductions from the Plans’ fiduciary net position have been determined on the same basis as they are reported by CalPERS. For this purpose, benefit payments (including refunds of employee contributions) are recognized when due and payable in accordance with the benefit terms. Investments are reported at fair value. N) Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) For purposes of measuring the net OPEB liability, deferred outflows/inflows of resources related to OPEB, and OPEB expense, information about the fiduciary net position of the District’s plan (OPEB Plan) and additions to/deductions from the OPEB Plan’s fiduciary net position have been determined on the same basis. For this purpose, benefit payments are recognized when currently due and payable in accordance with the benefit terms. Investments are reported at fair value. 24 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 1) REPORTING ENTITY AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - Continued N) Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) - Continued Generally accepted accounting principles require that the reported results must pertain to liability and asset information within certain defined timeframes. For this report, the following timeframes are used: 2021 2020 Valuation Date June 30, 2020 June 30, 2019 Measurement Date June 30, 2020 June 30, 2019 Measurement Period July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020 July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019 O) Use of Estimates The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, deferred outflows of resources, liabilities, and deferred inflows of resources, and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. P) Reclassifications Certain reclassifications have been made to prior year amounts to conform to the current year presentation. 2) CASH AND INVESTMENTS The primary goals of the District’s Investment Policy are to assure compliance with all Federal, State, and Local laws governing the investment of funds under the control of the organization, protect the principal of investments entrusted, remain sufficiently liquid to enable the District to meet all operating requirements and generate income under the parameters of such policies. Cash and Investments are classified in the accompanying financial statements as follows: 2021 2020 Statements of Net Position: Cash and Cash Equivalents $ 84,818,274 $ 65,089,488 Board Designated Cash and Cash Equivalents 3,092,512 2,598,569 Restricted Cash and Cash Equivalents 816,218 6,077,597 Restricted Investments 3,666,097 3,740,520 Total Cash and Investments $ 92,393,101 $ 77,506,174 25 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 2) CASH AND INVESTMENTS - Continued Cash and Investments consist of the following: 2021 2020 Cash on Hand $ 2,950 $ 2,950 Deposits with Financial Institutions 2,614,972 2,775,114 Investments 89,775,179 74,728,110 Total Cash and Investments $ 92,393,101 $ 77,506,174 Investments Authorized by the California Government Code and the District’s Investment Policy The table below identifies the investment types that are authorized for the District by the California Government Code (or the District’s Investment Policy, where more restrictive). The table also identifies certain provisions of the California Government Code (or the District’s Investment Policy, where more restrictive) that address interest rate risk, credit risk, and concentration of credit risk. This table does not address investments of debt proceeds held by bond trustee that are governed by the provisions of debt agreements of the District, rather than the general provisions of the California Government Code or the District’s Investment Policy. Maximum Maximum Authorized Maximum Percentage Investment Investment Type Maturity Of Portfolio(1) In One Issuer U.S. Treasury Obligations 5 years 100% 100% U.S. Government Sponsored Entities 5 years 100% 100% Certificates of Deposit 5 years 15% 100% Corporate Medium-Term Notes 5 years 10% 2% Commercial Paper 270 days 10% 2% Money Market Mutual Funds N/A 10% 100% County Pooled Investment Funds N/A 100% N/A Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) N/A $75 Million N/A (1) Excluding amounts held by bond trustee that are not subject to California Government Code restrictions. Investments Authorized by Debt Agreements Investments of debt proceeds held by the bond trustee are governed by provisions of the debt agreements, rather than the general provisions of the California Government Code or the District’s Investment Policy. Disclosures Relating to Interest Rate Risk Interest rate risk is the risk that changes in market interest rates will adversely affect the fair value of an investment. Generally, the longer the maturity of an investment, the greater the sensitivity of its fair value to changes in market interest rates. One of the ways that the District manages its exposure to interest rate risk is by purchasing investments with shorter durations than the maximum allowable under the District’s Investment Policy and by timing cash flows from maturities, so that a portion of the portfolio is maturing or coming close to maturity evenly over time, as necessary, to provide the cash flow and liquidity needed for operations. 26 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 2) CASH AND INVESTMENTS - Continued Disclosures Relating to Interest Rate Risk - Continued Information about the sensitivity of the fair values of the District’s investments to market interest rate fluctuations are provided by the following tables that show the distribution of the District’s investments by maturity as of June 30, 2021 and 2020. June 30, 2021 Remaining Maturity (in Months) 12 Months 13 to 24 25 to 60 More Than Investment Type Or Less Months Months 60 Months U.S. Government Sponsored Entities $ 3,666,097 $ 3,666,097 $ - $ - $ - Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 29,610,369 29,610,369 - - - San Diego County Pool 56,420,000 56,420,000 - - - Money Market Funds 78,713 78,713 - - - Total $ 89,775,179 $ 89,775,179 $ - $ - $ - June 30, 2020 Remaining Maturity (in Months) 12 Months 13 to 24 25 to 60 More Than Investment Type Or Less Months Months 60 Months U.S. Government Sponsored Entities $ 3,740,520 $ - $ 3,740,520 $ - $ - Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 65,748,989 65,748,989 - - - San Diego County Pool 5,155,000 5,155,000 - - - Money Market Funds 83,601 83,601 - - - Total $ 74,728,110 $ 70,987,590 $ 3,740,520 $ - $ - Disclosures Relating to Credit Risk Generally, credit risk is the risk that an issuer of an investment will not fulfill its obligation to the holder of the investment. This is measured by the assignment of a rating by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. Presented below is the minimum rating required by (where applicable) the California Government Code or the District’s Investment Policy, or debt agreements, and the Moody’s ratings as of June 30, 2021 and 2020. June 30, 2021 Minimum Rating as of Year End Legal Not Investment Type Rating AAA AA A-1 Rated U.S. Government Sponsored Entities $ 3,666,097 N/A $ 3,666,097 $ - $ - $ - Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 29,610,369 N/A - - - 29,610,369 San Diego County Pool 56,420,000 N/A - - - 56,420,000 Money Market Funds 78,713 N/A - - 78,713 - Total $ 89,775,179 $ 3,666,097 $ - $ 78,713 $ 86,030,369 27 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 2) CASH AND INVESTMENTS - Continued Disclosures Relating to Credit Risk - Continued June 30, 2020 Minimum Rating as of Year End Legal Not Investment Type Rating AAA AA A-1 Rated U.S. Government Sponsored Entities $ 3,740,520 N/A $ 3,740,520 $ - $ - $ - Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 65,748,989 N/A - - - 65,748,989 San Diego County Pool 5,155,000 N/A - - - 5,155,000 Money Market Funds 83,601 N/A - - 83,601 - Total $ 74,728,110 $ 3,740,520 $ - $ 83,601 $ 70,903,989 Concentration of Credit Risk The investment policy of the District contains various limitations on the amounts that can be invested in any one type or group of investments and in any issuer, beyond that stipulated by the California Government Code, Sections 53600 through 53692. All the investments for fiscal years 2021 and 2020 and within the limitations of the District’s investment policy. The investments listed below disclose the concentration of risk within the District’s investment portfolio. Investments in any one issuer (other than U.S. Treasury securities, mutual funds, and external investment pools) that represent 5% or more of total District investments as of June 30, 2021 and 2020: June 30, 2021 Issuer Investment Type Reported Amount Federal Home Loan Bank U.S. Government Sponsored Entities $ 3,666,097 June 30, 2020 Issuer Investment Type Reported Amount Federal Home Loan Bank U.S. Government Sponsored Entities $ 3,740,520 Custodial Credit Risk Custodial credit risk for deposits is the risk that, in the event of the failure of a depository financial institution, a government will not be able to recover its deposits or will not be able to recover collateral securities that are in the possession of an outside party. The custodial credit risk for investments is the risk that, in the event of the failure of the counterparty (e.g., broker-dealer) to a transaction, a government will not be able to recover the value of its investment or collateral securities that are in the possession of another party. The California Government Code and the District’s Investment Policy do not contain legal or policy requirements that would limit the exposure to custodial credit risk for deposits or investments, other than the following provision for deposits: The California Government Code requires that a financial institution secure deposits made by state or local government units by pledging securities in an undivided collateral pool held by a depository regulated under state law (unless so waived by the governmental unit). The market value of the pledged securities in the collateral pool must equal at least 110% of the total amount deposited by the public agencies. California law also allows financial institutions to secure deposits by pledging first trust deed mortgage notes having a value of 150% of the secured public deposits. 28 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 2) CASH AND INVESTMENTS - Continued Custodial Credit Risk - Continued As of June 30, 2021, $2,375,382 and as of June 30, 2020, $2,937,575 of the District’s deposits with financial institutions in excess of federal depository insurance limits, were held in collateralized accounts. Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) The District is a voluntary participant in the Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) that is regulated by California Government Code Section 16429 under the oversight of the Treasurer of the State of California. The fair value of the District’s investment in this pool is reported in the accompanying financial statements at amounts based upon District’s pro- rata share of the fair value provided by LAIF for the entire LAIF portfolio (in relation to the amortized cost of that portfolio). The balance available for withdrawal is based on the accounting records maintained by LAIF, which are recorded on an amortized cost-basis. The LAIF is a special fund of the California State Treasury through which local governments may pool investments. The District may invest up to $75,000,000 in the fund. Investments in LAIF are highly liquid, as deposits can be converted to cash within twenty-four hours without loss of interest. Investments with LAIF are secured by the full faith and credit of the State of California. The annualized yield of LAIF for the quarter ended June 30, 2021 was 0.33%. The estimated amortized cost and fair value of the LAIF pool at June 30, 2021 was $193,304,977,285 and $193,321,015,759. The District’s share of the pool at June 30, 2021 was approximately 0.01532%. The annualized yield of LAIF for the quarter ended June 30, 2020 was 1.47%. The estimated amortized cost and fair value of the LAIF pool at June 30, 2020 was $101,110,343,833 and $101,607,078,218. The District’s share of the pool at June 30, 2020 was approximately 0.05895%. San Diego County Pooled Fund The San Diego County Pooled Investment Fund (SDCPIF) is a pooled investment fund program governed by the County of San Diego Board of Supervisors, and administered by the County of San Diego Treasurer and Tax Collector. Investments in SDCPIF are highly liquid as deposits and withdrawals can be made at anytime without penalty, determined on an amortized cash basis, the same as the fair value of the District’s position in the pool. The County of San Diego’s bank deposits are either federally insured or collateralized in accordance with the California Government Code. Pool detail is included in the County of San Diego Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (“Annual Report”). Copies of the Annual Report may be obtained from the County of San Diego Auditor-Controller’s Office – 1600 Pacific Coast Highway, San Diego California 92101. Restricted Cash and Cash Equivalents 2021 2020 Debt Service: General Obligation Bond ID No. 27-2009 $ 442,633 $ 437,278 Water Revenue Bond Series 2010A 23,102 24,452 Water Revenue Bond Series 2010B 55,611 59,149 Water Revenue Bond Series 2018 294,872 5,556,718 Total $ 816,218 $ 6,077,597 29 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 2) CASH AND INVESTMENTS - Continued Board Designated Cash and Investments Cash and investments are Board restricted for the cost of the following District projects: 2021 2020 Cash and Cash Equivalents: New Water Supply $ 3,092,512 $ 2,598,569 Total $ 3,092,512 $ 2,598,569 Restricted Investments 2021 2020 Debt Service: Water Revenue Bond Series 2010A $ 1,009,432 $ 1,029,924 Water Revenue Bond Series 2010B 2,656,665 2,710,596 Total $ 3,666,097 $ 3,740,520 3) FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 72, Fair Value Measurements and Application, provides the framework for measuring fair value. The framework provides a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value with Level 1 given the highest priority and Level 3 the lowest priority. The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are as follows: Level 1 inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the organization has the ability to access at the measurement date. Level 2 inputs are inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Level 2 inputs include the following: a. Quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets. b. Quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active. c. Inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability (for example, interest rates and yield curves observable at commonly quoted intervals, volatilities, prepayment speeds, loss severities, credit risks, and default rates). d. Inputs that are derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data by correlation or other means (market-corroborated inputs). Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs for the asset or liability. 30 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 3) FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS - Continued Fair value of assets measured on a recurring basis at June 30, 2021 and 2020, are as follows: June 30, 2021 Significant Other Observable Inputs Fair Value (Level 2) Uncategorized U.S. Government Sponsored Entities $ 3,666,097 $ 3,666,097 $ - Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 29,610,369 -29,610,369 San Diego County Pool 56,420,000 -56,420,000 Money Market Funds 78,713 78,713 - Total $ 89,775,179 $ 3,744,810 $ 86,030,369 June 30, 2020 Significant Other Observable Inputs Fair Value (Level 2) Uncategorized U.S. Government Sponsored Entities $ 3,740,520 $ 3,740,520 $ - Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 65,748,989 -65,748,989 San Diego County Pool 5,155,000 -5,155,000 Money Market Funds 83,601 83,601 - Total $ 74,728,110 $ 3,824,121 $ 70,903,989 Investments classified in Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy are valued using a matrix pricing technique. Matrix pricing is used to value securities based on the securities’ relationship to benchmark quoted prices. Uncategorized investments do not fall under the fair value hierarchy as there is no active market for the investments. 31 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 4) CAPITAL ASSETS The following is a summary of changes in Capital Assets for the year ended June 30, 2021: Beginning Ending Balance Additions Deletions Balance Capital Assets, Not Depreciated: Land $ 14,423,773 $ - $ - $ 14,423,773 Construction in Progress 24,711,844 9,264,511 (8,190,003) 25,786,352 Total Capital Assets, Not Depreciated 39,135,617 9,264,511 (8,190,003) 40,210,125 Capital Assets, Being Depreciated: Infrastructure 672,699,638 10,550,082 (795,764) 682,453,956 Field Equipment 8,398,722 35,777 (327,095) 8,107,404 Buildings 19,462,893 259,707 (140,800) 19,581,800 Transportation Equipment 3,616,452 280,694 (147,045) 3,750,101 Communication Equipment 2,703,459 73,706 - 2,777,165 Office Equipment 16,444,241 182,568 (312,871) 16,313,938 Total Capital Assets, Being Depreciated 723,325,405 11,382,534 (1,723,575) 732,984,364 Less Accumulated Depreciation: Infrastructure 270,267,410 15,458,219 (719,310) 285,006,319 Field Equipment 6,398,078 328,855 (327,095) 6,399,838 Buildings 9,440,450 549,332 (34,026) 9,955,756 Transportation Equipment 2,419,841 277,566 (147,045) 2,550,362 Communication Equipment 2,326,786 158,932 - 2,485,718 Office Equipment 15,105,708 440,001 (311,617) 15,234,092 Total Accumulated Depreciation 305,958,273 17,212,905 (1,539,093) 321,632,085 Total Capital Assets, Being Depreciated, Net 417,367,132 (5,830,371) (184,482) 411,352,279 Total Capital Assets, Net $ 456,502,749 $ 3,434,140 $ (8,374,485) $ 451,562,404 Depreciation expense for the year ended June 30, 2021 was $17,212,905. 32 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 4) CAPITAL ASSETS - Continued The following is a summary of changes in Capital Assets for the year ended June 30, 2020: Beginning Ending Balance Additions Deletions Balance Capital Assets, Not Depreciated: Land $ 14,403,823 $ 19,950 $ - $ 14,423,773 Construction in Progress 33,149,164 14,637,214 (23,074,534) 24,711,844 Total Capital Assets, Not Depreciated 47,552,987 14,657,164 (23,074,534) 39,135,617 Capital Assets, Being Depreciated: Infrastructure 652,066,029 23,561,440 (2,927,831) 672,699,638 Field Equipment 8,572,710 208,646 (382,634) 8,398,722 Buildings 19,242,739 220,154 - 19,462,893 Transportation Equipment 3,525,948 504,210 (413,706) 3,616,452 Communication Equipment 3,417,918 64,066 (778,525) 2,703,459 Office Equipment 16,781,571 219,347 (556,677) 16,444,241 Total Capital Assets, Being Depreciated 703,606,915 24,777,863 (5,059,373) 723,325,405 Less Accumulated Depreciation: Infrastructure 256,979,110 14,846,658 (1,558,358) 270,267,410 Field Equipment 6,385,742 394,970 (382,634) 6,398,078 Buildings 8,915,004 525,446 - 9,440,450 Transportation Equipment 2,588,003 242,050 (410,212) 2,419,841 Communication Equipment 2,915,093 190,218 (778,525) 2,326,786 Office Equipment 15,067,603 579,625 (541,520) 15,105,708 Total Accumulated Depreciation 292,850,555 16,778,967 (3,671,249) 305,958,273 Total Capital Assets, Being Depreciated, Net 410,756,360 7,998,896 (1,388,124) 417,367,132 Total Capital Assets, Net $ 458,309,347 $ 22,656,060 $ (24,462,658) $ 456,502,749 Depreciation expense for the year ended June 30, 2020 was $16,778,967. 33 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 5) LONG-TERM DEBT Long-term liabilities for the year ended June 30, 2021 are as follows: Beginning Ending Due Within Balance Additions Deletions Balance One Year General Obligation Bonds: Improvement District No. 27 – 2009 $ 2,105,000 $ - $ 680,000 $ 1,425,000 $ 705,000 Unamortized Bond Premium 35,435 - 16,355 19,080 - Net General Obligation Bonds 2,140,435 - 696,355 1,444,080 705,000 Revenue Bonds: 2010 Water Revenue Bonds Series A 5,890,000 - 1,065,000 4,825,000 1,120,000 2010 Water Revenue Bonds Series B 36,355,000 - - 36,355,000 - 2013 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds 3,160,000 - 745,000 2,415,000 775,000 2016 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds 29,025,000 - 1,155,000 27,870,000 1,215,000 2018 Water Revenue Bonds 31,190,000 - 1,310,000 29,880,000 1,370,000 2019 Wastewater Revenue Bonds 3,120,000 - - 3,120,000 65,000 2010 Series A Unamortized Premium 316,207 - 74,402 241,805 - 2013 Bonds Unamortized Premium 304,301 - 96,095 208,206 - 2016 Bonds Unamortized Premium 2,886,904 - 178,571 2,708,333 - 2018 Bonds Unamortized Premium 2,528,599 - 109,148 2,419,451 - 2019 Bonds Unamortized Discount (13,449) - (461) (12,988) - Net Revenue Bonds 114,762,562 - 4,732,755 110,029,807 4,545,000 Total Long-Term Liabilities $ 116,902,997 $ - $ 5,429,110 $ 111,473,887 $ 5,250,000 34 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 5) LONG-TERM DEBT - Continued Long-term liabilities for the year ended June 30, 2020 are as follows: Beginning Ending Due Within Balance Additions Deletions Balance One Year General Obligation Bonds: Improvement District No. 27 – 2009 $ 2,755,000 $ - $ 650,000 $ 2,105,000 $ 680,000 Unamortized Bond Premium 51,789 - 16,354 35,435 - Net General Obligation Bonds 2,806,789 - 666,354 2,140,435 680,000 Revenue Bonds: 2010 Water Revenue Bonds Series A 6,905,000 - 1,015,000 5,890,000 1,065,000 2010 Water Revenue Bonds Series B 36,355,000 - - 36,355,000 - 2013 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds 3,875,000 - 715,000 3,160,000 745,000 2016 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds 30,125,000 - 1,100,000 29,025,000 1,155,000 2018 Water Revenue Bonds 32,435,000 - 1,245,000 31,190,000 1,310,000 2019 Wastewater Revenue Bonds - 3,120,000 - 3,120,000 - 2010 Series A Unamortized Premium 390,609 - 74,402 316,207 - 2013 Bonds Unamortized Premium 400,396 - 96,095 304,301 - 2016 Bonds Unamortized Premium 3,065,476 - 178,572 2,886,904 - 2018 Bonds Unamortized Premium 2,637,747 - 109,148 2,528,599 - 2019 Bonds Unamortized Discount - (13,680) (231) (13,449) - Net Revenue Bonds 116,189,228 3,106,320 4,532,986 114,762,562 4,275,000 Total Long-Term Liabilities $ 118,996,017 $ 3,106,320 $ 5,199,340 $ 116,902,997 $ 4,955,000 General Obligation Bonds In June 1998, the District issued $11,835,000 of General Obligation Refunding Bonds. The proceeds of this issue, together with other lawfully available monies, were to be used to establish an irrevocable escrow to advance refund and defease in their entirety the District’s previous outstanding General Obligation Bond issue. In November 2009, the District issued $7,780,000 of General Obligation Refunding Bonds Improvement District No. 27-2009 to refund the 1998 issue. The proceeds from the bond issue were $7,989,884, which included an original issue premium of $209,884. An amount of $7,824,647, which consisted of unpaid principal and accrued interest, was deposited into an escrow fund. Pursuant to an optional redemption clause in the 1998 bonds, the District was able to redeem the 1998 bonds, without premium at any time after September 1, 2009. On December 15, 2009 the 1998 bonds were refunded. These bonds are general obligations of Improvement District No. 27 (ID 27) of the District. The Board of Directors has the power and is obligated to levy annual ad valorem taxes without limitation, as to rate or amount for payment of the bonds and the interest upon all property which is within ID 27 and subject to taxation. The General Obligation Bonds are payable from District-wide tax revenues. The Board may utilize other sources for servicing the bond debt and interest. The Improvement District No. 27-2009 General Obligation Refunding Bonds have interest rates from 3.00% to 4.00% with maturities through Fiscal Year 2023. 35 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 5) LONG-TERM DEBT - Continued General Obligation Bonds - Continued Future debt service requirements for the bonds are as follows: For the Year Ended June 30, Principal Interest 2022 $ 705,000 $ 42,900 2023 720,000 14,400 $ 1,425,000 $ 57,300 Water Revenue Bonds In April 2010, Water Revenue Bonds with a face value of $50,195,000 were sold by the Otay Water District Financing Authority to provide funds for the construction of water storage and transmission facilities. The bond issue consisted of two series; Water Revenue Bonds, Series 2010A (Non-AMT Tax Exempt) with a face value of $13,840,000 plus a $1,078,824 original issue premium, and Water Revenue Bonds, Series 2010B (Taxable Build America Bonds) with a face value of $36,355,000. The Series 2010A bonds are due in annual installments of $785,000 to $1,295,000 from September 1, 2012 through September 1, 2025; bearing interest at 2% to 5.25%. The Series 2010B bonds are due in annual installments of $1,365,000 to $3,505,000 from September 1, 2026 through September 1, 2040; bearing interest at 6.377% to 6.577%. Interest on both Series is payable on September 1, 2010 and semiannually thereafter on March 1st and September 1st of each year until maturity or earlier redemption. The installment payments are to be made from taxes and net revenues of the Water System as described in the installment purchase agreement, on parity with the payments required to be made by the District for the 2013, 2016 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds and 2018 Water Revenue Bonds described below. The proceeds of the bonds will be used to fund the project noted above as well as to fund reserve funds of $1,030,688 (Series 2010A) and $2,707,418 (Series 2010B). $542,666 was used to fund various costs of issuance. The original issue premium is being amortized over the 14-year life of the Series 2010A bonds. Amortization for the year ending June 30, 2021 was $74,402 and for June 30, 2020 was $74,402. The amortizations are included in interest expense. The unamortized premium at June 30, 2021 is $241,805 and at June 30, 2020 is $316,207. The 2010 Water Revenue Bonds contains various covenants and restrictions, principally that the District fix, prescribe, revise and collect rates, fees and charges for the Water System which will at least be sufficient to yield, during each fiscal year, taxes and net revenues equal to one hundred twenty-five percent (125%) of the debt service for such fiscal year. The District was in compliance with these rate covenants for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2021 and 2020. In June 2013, the 2013 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds were issued to defease the 2004 Refunding Certificates of Participation. The bonds were issued with a face value of $7,735,000 plus a $984,975 original issue premium. The bonds are due in annual installments of $660,000 to $835,000 from September 1, 2013 through September 1, 2023; bearing interest at 1% to 4%. The installment payments are to be made from taxes and net revenues of the Water System, on parity with the payments required to be made by the District for the 2016 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds, the 2010A, 2010B and 2018 Water Revenue Bonds described above. 36 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 5) LONG-TERM DEBT - Continued Water Revenue Bonds - Continued The original issue premium is being amortized over the 11 year life of the Series 2013 bonds. Amortization for the year ending June 30, 2021 was $96,095 and for June 30, 2020 was $96,095. The amortizations are included in interest expense. The unamortized premium at June 30, 2021 is $208,206 and at June 30, 2020 is $304,301. In May 2016, Water Revenue Refunding Bonds were issued to defease the 2007 Revenue Certificates of Participation. The bonds are due in annual installments of $1,200,000 to $2,235,000 from September 1, 2016 through September 1, 2036; bearing interest of 2% to 5%. The bonds were issued with a face value of $33,385,000 plus $3,630,950 original issue premium. The savings between the cash flow required to service, the old debt and the cash flow required to service the new debt is $5,664,140 and represent an economic gain on refunding of $4,538,175. The original issue premium is being amortized over the 20 year life of the Series 2016 bonds. Amortization for the year ending June 30, 2021 was $178,572 and for June 30, 2020 was $178,572. The amortizations are included in interest expense. The unamortized premium at June 30, 2021 is $2,708,333 and at June 30, 2020 is $2,886,904. In November 2018, Water Revenue Bonds were issued to provide funds for construction of water storage, treatment and transmission facilities and to refinance the 1996 Certificates of Participation. The bonds are due in annual installments of $775,000 to $1,915,000 from September 1, 2019 through September 1, 2043; bearing interest of 3% to 5%. The bonds were issued with a face value of $32,435,000 plus $2,710,512 original issue premium. The original issue premium is being amortized over the 25 year life of the Series 2018 bonds. Amortization for the year ending June 30, 2021 was $109,148 and for June 30, 2020 was $109,148. The amortization expense is included in interest expense. The unamortized premium at June 30, 2021 is $2,419,451 and at June 30, 2020 is $2,528,599. The total amount outstanding at June 30, 2021 and aggregate maturities of the revenue bonds for the fiscal years subsequent to June 30, 2021, are as follows: For the Year 2010 Water Revenue Bond Series A 2010 Water Revenue Bond Series B 2013 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds Ended June 30, Principal Interest Principal Interest Principal Interest 2022 $ 1,120,000 $ 216,488 $ - $ 2,371,868 $ 775,000 $ 81,100 2023 1,175,000 159,113 - 2,371,868 805,000 49,500 2024 1,235,000 98,862 - 2,371,868 835,000 16,700 2025 1,295,000 33,994 - 2,371,868 - - 2026 - - 1,365,000 2,328,345 - - 2027-2031 - - 8,235,000 10,175,654 - - 2032-2036 - - 11,265,000 7,040,514 - - 2037-2041 - - 15,490,000 2,676,839 - - $ 4,825,000 $ 508,457 $ 36,355,000 $ 31,708,824 $ 2,415,000 $ 147,300 37 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 5) LONG-TERM DEBT - Continued Water Revenue Bonds - Continued For the Year 2016 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds 2018 Water Revenue Refunding Bonds Ended June 30, Principal Interest Principal Interest 2022 $ 1,215,000 $ 1,004,206 $ 1,370,000 $ 1,294,038 2023 1,285,000 941,706 1,455,000 1,223,413 2024 1,350,000 875,831 1,650,000 1,145,787 2025 1,420,000 806,581 1,730,000 1,061,288 2026 1,495,000 733,706 1,820,000 972,537 2027-2031 8,570,000 2,582,407 6,355,000 3,774,062 2032-2036 10,300,000 1,041,841 6,750,000 2,392,838 2037-2041 2,235,000 33,525 6,190,000 1,106,456 2042-2044 - - 2,560,000 146,200 $ 27,870,000 $ 8,019,803 $ 29,880,000 $ 13,116,619 Wastewater Revenue Bonds In December 2019, Wastewater Revenue Bonds were issued to provide funds to pay for certain capital improvements to the District’s wastewater system. The bonds are due in annual installments of $65,000 to $160,000 from September 1, 2021 through September 1, 2049; bearing interest of 2% to 3.125%. The bonds were issued with a face value of $3,120,000 less a $13,680 original issue discount. The original issue discount is being amortized over the 50 year life of the Series 2019 bonds. Amortization for the year ending June 30, 2021 was $461 and June 30, 2020 was $231. The amortization expense is included in interest expense. The unamortized discount at June 20,2021 is $12,988 and at June 30, 2020 is $13,449. The 2019 Wastewater Revenue Bonds contains various covenants and restrictions, principally that the District fix, prescribe, revise and collect rates, fees and charges for the Wastewater System which will at least be sufficient to yield, during each fiscal year, net revenues equal to one hundred fifteen percent (115%) of the debt service for such fiscal year. The District was in compliance with these rate covenants for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2021 and 2020. Future debt service requirements for the bonds are as follows: For the Year 2019 Wastewater Revenue Bonds Ended June 30, Principal Interest 2022 $ 65,000 $ 90,091 2023 70,000 88,741 2024 75,000 87,291 2025 75,000 85,416 2026 80,000 83,091 2027-2031 430,000 377,957 2032-2036 495,000 313,279 2037-2041 565,000 238,888 2042-2046 655,000 147,422 2047-2050 610,000 38,906 $ 3,120,000 $ 1,551,082 38 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 5) LONG-TERM DEBT - Continued Revenues Pledged The District has pledged a portion of future water sales revenues to repay its Water Revenue and Water Revenue Refunding Bonds. Total principal and interest remaining on the water revenue bonds and water revenue refunding bonds is $154,846,003 payable through fiscal year 2044. For June 30, 2021, principal and interest paid by the water sales revenues were $4,275,000 and $5,178,974, respectively. For June 30, 2020, principal and interest paid by the water sales revenues were $4,075,000 and $5,380,424, respectively. The District has pledged a portion of future wastewater sales revenues to repay its Wastewater Revenue Bonds. Total principal and interest remaining on the wastewater revenue bonds is $4,671,082 payable through fiscal year 2050. For June 30, 2021, principal and interest paid by the wastewater sales revenues were $0 and $90,741, respectively. For June 30, 2021, principal and interest paid by the wastewater sales revenues were $0 and $90,713, respectively. 6) NET POSITION Designations of Net Position In addition to the restricted net position, a portion of unrestricted net position, have been designated by the Board of Directors for the following purposes as of June 30, 2021 and 2020: 2021 2020 Designated Betterment $ 2,507,060 $ 4,208,271 Replacement Reserve 34,145,548 25,545,931 Designated Expansion 1,293,846 2,262,219 Designated New Supply Fund 5,922 240,764 Employee Benefits Reserve 463,890 386,907 Total $ 38,416,266 $ 32,644,092 7) DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN A) General Information about the Pension Plans Plan Descriptions All qualified permanent and probationary employees are eligible to participate in the District’s Plan, agent multiple- employer defined benefit pension plans administered by the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), which acts as a common investment and administrative agent for its participating member employers. Benefit provisions under the Plans are established by State statute and District resolution. CalPERS issues publicly available reports that include a full description of the pension plans regarding provisions, assumptions and membership information that can be found on the CalPERS website. 39 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 7) DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN - Continued Benefits Provided CalPERS provides service retirement and disability benefits, annual cost of living adjustments and death benefits to plan members, who must be public employees and beneficiaries. Benefits are based on years of credited service, equal to one year of full time employment. Members with five years of total service are eligible to retire at age 50 with statutorily reduced benefits. All members are eligible for non-duty disability benefits after 10 years of service. The death benefit is one of the following: the Basic Death Benefit, the 1957 Survivor Benefit, or the Optional Settlement 2W Death Benefit. The cost of living adjustments for the plan are applied as specified by the Public Employees’ Retirement Law. The Plans’ provisions and benefits in effect at June 30, 2021 and 2020 are summarized as follows: Prior to On or After Hire Date January 1, 2013 January 1, 2013 Benefit Formula 2.7% at 55 2% at 62 Benefit Vesting Schedule 5 years service 5 years service Benefit Payments Monthly for life Monthly for life Retirement Age 50 – 55+ 52 – 67+ Monthly Benefits, as a % of Eligible Compensation 2.0% to 2.7% 1.0% to 2.5% Required Employee Contribution Rates 2021 8.00% 7.00% 2020 8.00% 6.25% Required Employer Contribution Rates 2021 20.113% 20.113% 2020 40.689% 40.689% Employees Covered The following employees were covered by the benefit terms for the Plan: 2021 2020 Inactive Employees or Beneficiaries Currently Receiving Benefits 202 175 Inactive Employees Entitled to But Not Yet Receiving Benefits 128 140 Active Employees 134 134 Total 464 449 40 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 7) DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN - Continued Contributions Section 20814(c) of the California Public Employees’ Retirement Law requires that the employer contribution rates for all public employers be determined on an annual basis by the actuary and shall be effective on the July 1 following notice of a change in the rate. Funding contributions for the Plan are determined annually on an actuarial basis as of June 30 by CalPERS. The actuarially determined rate is the estimated amount necessary to finance the costs of benefits earned by employees during the year, with an additional amount to finance any unfunded accrued liability. The District is required to contribute the difference between the actuarially determined rate and the contribution rate of employees. B) Net Pension Liability The District’s net pension liability for the Plan is measured as the total pension liability, less the pension plan’s fiduciary net position. The net pension liability of the Plan is measured as of June 30, 2020 and 2019, using the annual actuarial valuations as of June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively, rolled forward to June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively, using standard update procedures. A summary of principal assumptions and methods used to determine the net pension liability is shown below: Actuarial Assumptions The total pension liabilities in the June 30, 2021 and 2020 actuarial valuations were determined using the following actuarial assumptions: 2021 2020 Valuation Date June 30, 2019 June 30, 2018 Measurement Date June 30, 2020 June 30, 2019 Actuarial Cost Method Entry-Age Normal Cost Method Entry-Age Normal Cost Method Actuarial Assumptions: Discount Rate 7.15% 7.15% Inflation 2.5% 2.5% Salaries Increases Varies(1) Varies(1) Mortality Rate Table CalPERS Membership Data(2) CalPERS Membership Data(2) Post Retirement Benefit Increase See Footnote(3) See Footnote(3) (1) Depending on age, service and type of employment. (2) The mortality table used was developed based on CalPERS-specific data. The probabilities of mortality are based on the 2017 CalPERS Experience Study for the period from 1997 to 2015. Pe-retirement and Post- retirement mortality rates include 15 years of projected mortality improvement using 90% of Scale MP-2016 published by the Society of Actuaries. For more details on this table, please refer to the CalPERS Experience Study and Review of Actuarial Assumptions report form December 2017 that can be found on the CalPERS website. (3) The lesser of contract COLA or 2.5% until Purchasing Power Protection Allowance floor on purchasing power applies, 2.5% thereafter. 41 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 7) DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN - Continued B) Net Pension Liability - Continued Discount Rate The discount rate used to measure the total pension liability at June 30, 2020 and 2019 measurement dates was 7.15% for the Plan. The projection of cash flows used to determine the discount rate assumed that contributions from plan members will be made at the current member contribution rates and that contributions from employers will be made at statutorily required rates, actuarially determined. Based on those assumptions, the Plan’s fiduciary net position was projected to be available to make all projected future benefit payments of current plan members. Therefore, the long-term expected rate of return on plan investments was applied to all periods of projected benefit payments to determine the total pension liability. Long-term Expected Rate of Return The long-term expected rate of return on pension plan investments was determined using a building-block method in which best-estimate ranges of expected future real rates of return (expected returns, net of pension plan investment expense and inflation) are developed for each major asset class. In determining the long-term expected rate of return, CalPERS took into account both short-term and long-term market return expectations as well as the expected pension fund cash flows. Using historical returns of all the funds’ asset classes, expected compound (geometric) returns were calculated over the short-term (first 10 years) and the long-term (11+ years) using a building-block approach. Using the expected nominal returns for both short-term and long-term, the present value of benefits was calculated for each fund. The expected rate of return was set by calculating the single equivalent expected return that arrived at the same present value of benefits for cash flows as the one calculated using both short-term and long-term returns. The expected rate of return was then set equal to the single equivalent rate calculated above and adjusted to account for assumed administrative expenses. The following table reflects the long-term expected real rate of return by asset class. Asset Class(a) Assumed Asset Allocation Real Return Years 1 - 10(b) Real Return Years 11+(c) 2020 2019 2020 2019 2020 2019 Global Equity 50.0% 50.0% 4.80% 4.80% 5.98% 5.98% Fixed Income 28.0% 28.0% 1.00% 1.00% 2.62% 2.62% Inflation Assets/Sensitive - - 0.77% 0.77% 1.81% 1.81% Private Equity 8.0% 8.0% 6.30% 6.30% 7.23% 7.23% Real Assets 13.0% 13.0% 3.75% 3.75% 4.93% 4.93% Liquidity 1.0% 1.0% - - -0.92% -0.92% Total 100% 100% (a) In the System’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, Fixed Income in included in Global Debt Securities; Liquidity is included in Short-term Investments; Inflation Assets are included in both Global Equity Securities and Global Debt Securities. (b) An expected inflation of 2.00% used for this period. (c) An expected inflation of 2.92% used for this period. 42 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 7) DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN - Continued C) Changes in the Net Pension Liability The changes in the Net Pension Liability for the Plan for June 30, 2021: Increase (Decrease) Total Pension Liability Plan Fiduciary Net Position Net Pension Liability/(Asset) Beginning Balance $ 142,409,387 $ 125,792,532 $ 16,616,855 Changes in the Year: Service Cost 2,623,208 - 2,623,208 Interest on the Total Pension Liability 10,043,778 - 10,043,778 Changes in Benefit Terms - - - Changes in Assumptions - - - Differences Between Expected and Actual Experience 260,337 - 260,337 Net Plan to Plan Resource Movement - - - Contributions - Employer - 2,437,119 (2,437,119) Contributions - Employees - 1,055,769 (1,055,769) Net Investment Income - 6,185,108 (6,185,108) Benefit Payments, Including Refunds of Employee Contributions (7,017,816) (7,017,816) - Administrative Expense - (177,337) 177,337 Other Miscellaneous Income/(Expense) - - - Net Changes 5,909,507 2,482,843 3,426,664 Ending Balance $ 148,318,894 $ 128,275,375 $ 20,043,519 43 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 7) DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN - Continued C) Changes in the Net Pension Liability - Continued The changes in the Net Pension Liability for the Plan for June 30, 2020: Increase (Decrease) Total Pension Liability Plan Fiduciary Net Position Net Pension Liability/(Asset) Beginning Balance $ 135,659,308 $ 87,270,402 $ 48,388,906 Changes in the Year: Service Cost 2,586,911 - 2,586,911 Interest on the Total Pension Liability 9,638,674 - 9,638,674 Changes in Benefit Terms - - - Changes in Assumptions - - - Differences Between Expected and Actual Experience 1,183,213 - 1,183,213 Net Plan to Plan Resource Movement - - - Contributions - Employer - 36,706,983 (36,706,983) Contributions - Employees - 1,019,255 (1,019,255) Net Investment Income - 7,516,686 (7,516,686) Benefit Payments, Including Refunds of Employee Contributions (6,658,719) (6,658,719) - Administrative Expense - (62,278) 62,278 Other Miscellaneous Income/(Expense) - 203 (203) Net Changes 6,750,079 38,522,130 (31,772,051) Ending Balance $ 142,409,387 $ 125,792,532 $ 16,616,855 Sensitivity of the Net Pension Liability to Changes in the Discount Rate The following presents the net pension liability of the District for the Plan, calculated using the discount rate for the Plan, as well as what the District’s net pension liability would be if it were calculated using a discount rate that is 1- percentage point lower or 1-percentage point higher than the current rate: 2021 2020 1% Decrease 6.15% 6.15% Net Pension Liability $ 38,999,382 $ 35,122,134 Current Discount Rate 7.15% 7.15% Net Pension Liability $ 20,043,519 $ 16,616,855 1% Increase 8.15% 8.15% Net Pension Liability $ 4,253,474 $ 1,228,256 44 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 7) DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN - Continued C) Changes in the Net Pension Liability - Continued Pension Plan Fiduciary Net Position Detailed information about the pension plan’s fiduciary net position is available in the separately issued CalPERS financial reports. D) Pension Expenses and Deferred Outflows/Inflows of Resources Related to Pensions For the years ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, the District recognized pension expense of $3,962,800 and $6,567,636. At June 30, 2021 and 2020, the District reported deferred outflows of resources and deferred inflows of resources related to pensions from the following services: Deferred Outflows of Resources Deferred Inflows of Resources 2021 2020 2021 2020 Pension contributions subsequent to measurement date $ 3,965,952 $ 2,465,751 $ - $ - Differences between actual and expected experience 501,977 892,614 - - Changes in assumptions - - - (375,038) Net difference between projected and actual earnings on pension plan investments 953,594 - - (991,620) Total $ 5,421,523 $ 3,358,365 $ - $ (1,366,658) For fiscal year 2020, $2,465,751 reported as deferred outflows of resources related to contributions subsequent to the measurement date was recognized as a reduction of the net pension liability during the year ended June 30, 2021. For fiscal year 2021, $3,965,952 reported as deferred outflows of resources related to contributions subsequent to the measurement date will be recognized as a reduction of the net pension liability in the year ended June 30, 2022. Other amounts reported as deferred outflows of resources and deferred inflows of resources related to pensions will be recognized as pension expense as follows: Deferred Year Ended Outflow/(Inflows) June 30 of Resources 2022 $ 104,548 2023 323,029 2024 495,413 2025 532,581 2026 - Thereafter - 45 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 7) DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN - Continued E) Payable to the Pension Plan At June 30, 2021 and 2020, the District reported a payable of $91,450 and $72,881, respectively, for the outstanding amount of contributions to the pension plan required for the years ended June 30, 2021 and 2020. These payables are reflected in the accrued payroll liabilities on the Statements of Net Position. 8) OTHER POST EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (OPEB) Plan Description The District’s defined benefit postemployment healthcare plan, (DPHP), provides medical benefits to eligible retired District employees and beneficiaries. DPHP is part of the Public Agency portion of the California Employers’ Retiree Benefit Trust Fund (CERBT), an agent multiple-employer plan administered by California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), which acts as a common investment and administrative agent for participating public employers within the State of California. CalPERS issues a separate Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. Copies of the CalPERS’ annual financial report may be obtained from the CalPERS Executive Office, 400 P Street, Sacramento, California 95814. Prior to the plan agreements signed in 2011, the eligibility in the plan was broken into 3 tiers, employees hired before January 1, 1981, employees hired on or after January 1, 1981 but before July 1, 1993 and employees hired on or after July 1, 1993. Board members elected before January 1, 1995 are also eligible for the plan. Eligibility also includes age and years of service requirements which vary by tier. Benefits include up to 100% medical and/or dental premiums for life for the retiree for Tier I, II or III employees, and up to 100% spouse premium until death of retiree or age 65 whichever is greater and dependent premium up to age 19 depending on the tier. Subsequent to the agreements in 2011 and 2012 all employees are eligible for the plan after 20 years of consecutive service and unrepresented employees hired before January 1, 2013 are eligible after 15 years. Survivor benefits are covered beyond Medicare. Employees Covered As of June 30, 2020 and 2019 actuarial valuations, the following current and former employees were covered by the benefit terms under the Plan: 2020 2019 Active employees 1 3 3 1 3 3 Inactive employees or beneficiaries currently receiving benefits 76 76 Inactive employees entitled to, but not yet receiving benefits - - Total 209 209 46 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 8) OTHER POST EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (OPEB) - Continued Contributions The annual contribution is based on the actuarially determined contribution. For the fiscal years ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, the District’s cash contributions were $807,867 and $1,011,358, respectively, in payments to the trust. Net OPEB Liability The District’s net OPEB liability was measured as of June 30, 2020 and 2019 and the total OPEB liability used to calculate the net OPEB liability was determined by actuarial valuations dated June 30, 2020 and 2019 based on the following actuarial methods and assumptions: Actuarial Assumptions Discount Rate 7.00% Inflation 2.75% Salary Increases 2.75% plus merit Investment Rate of Return 7.00% Mortality Rate(1) Derived using CalPERS Membership Data for all funds Pre-Retirement Turnover(2) Derived using CalPERS Membership Data for all funds Healthcare Trend Rate 6.00% PPO decreasing to 5.00% PPO Notes: (1) Pre-retirement mortality information was derived from data collected during 1997 to 2011 CalPERS Experience Study dated January 2014 and post-retirement mortality information was derived from the 2007 to 2011 CalPERS Experience Study. The Experience Study Reports may be access on the CalPERS website www.calpers.ca.gov under Forms and Publications. (2) The pre-retirement turnover information was developed based on CalPERS specific data. For more details, please refer to the 2007 to 2011 Experience Study Report. The Experience Study Report may be accessed on the CalPERS website www.calpers.ca.gov under Forms and Publications. The long-term expected rate of return on OPEB plan investments was determined using a building block method in which best-estimate ranges of expected future real rates of return (expected returns, net of OPEB plan investment expense and inflation) are developed for each major asset class. These ranges are combined to produce the long-term expected rate of return by weighting the expected future real rates of return by the target asset allocation percentage and by adding expected inflation. Best estimates of arithmetic real rates of return for each major asset class included in the OPEB plan’s target asset are summarized in the following table for the June 30, 2020 and 2019 actuarial valuations: 47 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 8) OTHER POST EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (OPEB) - Continued Long-term Target Expected Real Asset Class Allocation Rate of Return 2020 2019 2020 2019 Global Equity 59.0% 59.0% 5.5% 5.5% Global Fixed Income 25.0% 25.0% 2.35% 2.35% TIPS 5.0% 5.0% 1.50% 1.50% Commodities 3.0% 3.0% 1.75% 1.75% REITs 8.0% 8.0% 3.65% 3.65% Total 100% 100% Discount Rate The discount rate used to measure the total OPEB liability was 7.00% for the June 30, 2020 and 2019 actuarial valuations. The projection of cash flows used to determine the discount rate assumed that District contributions will be made at rates equal to the actuarially determined contribution rates. Based on those assumptions, the OPEB plan’s fiduciary net position was projected to be available to make all projected OPEB payments for current active and inactive employees and beneficiaries. Therefore, the long-term expected rate of return on OPEB plan investments was applied to all periods of projects benefit payments to determine the total OPEB liability. Changes in the OPEB Liability (Asset) The changes in the net OPEB liability (asset) for the Plan are as follows: June 30, 2021 Increase (Decrease) Total OPEB Liability (a) Plan Fiduciary Net Position (b) Net OPEB Liability/(Asset) (c) = (a) - (b) Balance at June 30, 2020 (Valuation Date June 30, 2019) $ 27,177,329 $ 27,197,350 $ (20,021) Changes Recognized for the Measurement Period: Service Cost 735,529 - 735,529 Interest 1,915,358 - 1,915,358 Differences between expected and actual experience 1,151,927 - 1,151,927 Changes of Assumptions - - - Contributions - Employer - 1,011,358 (1,011,358) Net Investment Income - 983,790 (983,790) Benefit Payments (1,120,146) (1,120,146) - Administrative Expenses - (13,514) 13,514 Other Expenses - - - Net Changes 2,682,668 861,488 1,821,180 Balance at June 30, 2021 (Measurement Date June 30, 2020) $ 29,859,997 $ 28,058,838 $ 1,801,159 48 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 8)OTHER POST EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (OPEB) - Continued Changes in the OPEB Liability (Asset) - Continued June 30, 2020 Increase (Decrease) Total OPEB Liability (a) Plan Fiduciary Net Position (b) Net OPEB Liability/(Asset) (c) = (a) - (b) Balance at June 30, 2019 (Valuation Date June 30, 2018) $ 27,964,563 $ 24,549,538 $ 3,415,025 Changes Recognized for the Measurement Period: Service Cost 757,725 -757,725 Interest 1,970,613 -1,970,613 Differences between expected and actual experience (2,029,118) -(2,029,118) Changes of Assumptions (345,110) -(345,110) Contributions - Employer - 2,206,363 (2,206,363) Net Investment Income -1,595,092 (1,595,092) Benefit Payments (1,141,344) (1,141,344)- Administrative Expenses -(12,299)12,299 Other Expenses --- Net Changes (787,234) 2,647,812 (3,435,046) Balance at June 30, 2020 (Measurement Date June 30, 2019) $ 27,177,329 $ 27,197,350 $ (20,021) Sensitivity of the Net OPEB Liability (Asset) to Changes in the Discount Rate The following presents the net OPEB liability (asset) of the District if it were calculated using a discount rate that is one percentage point lower or one percentage point higher than the current rate, for the measurement periods ended June 30, 2020 and 2019: 1% Decrease Current Discount Rate 1% Increase 2021 Net OPEB Liability (Asset) $ 6,374,570 $ 1,801,159 $ (1,912,135) (2020 Measurement Period) 2020 Net OPEB Liability (Asset) $ 4,124,269 $ (20,021) $ (3,385,633) (2019 Measurement Period) 49 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 8)OTHER POST EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (OPEB) - Continued Sensitivity of the Net OPEB Liability to Changes in the Health Care Cost Trend Rates The following presents the net OPEB liability of the District if it were calculated using health care cost trend rates that are one percentage point lower or one percentage point higher than the current rate, for measurement periods ended June 30, 2020 and 2019: 1% Decrease (5.00% HMO/5.00% PPO Decreasing to 4.00% HMO/4.00% PPO) Current Healthcare Cost Trend Rates (6.00% HMO/6.0% PPO Decreasing to 5.00% HMO/5.00% PPO) 1% Increase (7.00% HMO/7.00% PPO Decreasing to 6.00% HMO/6.00% PPO) 2021 Net OPEB Liability (Asset) $ (2,525,323) $ 1,801,159 $ 7,256,118 (2020 Measurement Period) 2020 Net OPEB Liability (Asset) $ (3,730,121) $ (20,021) $ 4,639,466 (2019 Measurement Period) OPEB Plan Fiduciary Net Position CERBT issues a publicly available financial report that may be obtained from the California Public Employees Retirement System Executive Office, 400 P Street, Sacramento, California 95814. Recognition of Deferred Outflows and Deferred Inflows of Resources Gains and losses related to changes in total OPEB liability and fiduciary net position are recognized in OPEB expense systematically over time. Amounts are first recognized in OPEB expense for the year the gain or loss occurs. The remaining amounts are categorized as deferred outflows and deferred inflows of resources related to OPEB and are to be recognized in future OPEB expense. The recognition period differs depending on the source of the gain or loss: Net difference between projected and actual earnings on OPEB plan investments 5 years All other amounts Expected average remaining service lifetime (EARSL) 50 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 8) OTHER POST EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (OPEB) - Continued OPEB Expense and Deferred Outflows/Inflows of Resources Related to OPEB For the fiscal years ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, the District recognized OPEB expense of $(660,336) and $(692,893), respectively. As of fiscal years ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, the District reported deferred outflows of resources related to OPEB from the following sources: Deferred Outflows of Resources Deferred Inflows of Resources 2021 2020 2021 2020 OPEB contributions subsequent to measurement date $ 807,867 $ 1,011,358 $ - $ - Differences between expected and actual experience 1,007,936 - (1,217,470) (1,623,294) Changes in assumptions - - (207,066) (276,088) Net difference between projected and actual earnings on OPEB plan investments 623,829 128,177 - (374,867) Total $ 2,439,632 $ 1,139,535 $ (1,424,536) $ (2,274,249) The $807,867 reported as deferred outflows of resources related to contributions subsequent to the June 30, 2021 measurement date will be recognized as a reduction of the net OPEB liability during the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022. Other amounts reported as deferred outflows of resources related to OPEB will be recognized as expense as follows: Deferred Year Ended Outflow/(Inflows) June 30, of Resources 2022 (285,559) 2023 (150,694) 2024 (115,645) 2025 327,155 2026 143,991 Thereafter 287,981 9) COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES Construction Commitments The District had committed to capital projects under construction with an estimated cost to complete of $2,912,364 and $2,706,350 at June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively. 51 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 9) COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES - Continued Litigation Certain claims, suits and complaints arising in the ordinary course of operation have been filed or are pending against the District. In the opinion of the staff and counsel, most of those matters are adequately covered by insurance, or if not so covered, are without merit or are of such kind, or involved such amounts, as would not have significant effect on the financial position or results of operations of the District if disposed of unfavorably. There is one potential case, see below, that could have a significant effect on the District’s financial position. The District is involved in a class action lawsuit regarding its single-family residential tiered water rates between July 2014 and current which were based on industry standard cost-of-service studies. Although the District believes no significant damages are involved, there is an uncertainty, due to recent cases, on the likelihood of a favorable decision to the District. The amount of potential loss is currently unavailable due to the complex nature of the case and the uncertainty of the outcome. Refundable Terminal Storage Fees The District has entered into an agreement with several developers whereby the developers prepaid the terminal storage fee in order to provide the District with the funds necessary to build additional storage capacity. The agreement further allows the developers to relinquish all or a portion of such water storage capacity. If the District grants to another property owner the relinquished storage capacity, the District shall refund to the applicable developer $746 per equivalent dwelling unit (EDU). There were 17,867 EDUs that were subject to this agreement. At June 30, 2021, 1,750 EDUs had been relinquished and refunded, 15,091 EDUs had been connected, and 1,026 EDUs have neither been relinquished nor connected. At June 30, 2020, 1,750 EDUs had been relinquished and refunded, 15,088 EDUs had been connected, and 1,029 EDUs have neither been relinquished nor connected. Developer Agreements The District has entered into various Developer Agreements with developers towards the expansion of District facilities. The developers agree to make certain improvements and after the completion of the projects the District agrees to reimburse such improvements with a maximum reimbursement amount for each developer. Contractually, the District does not incur a liability for the work until the work is accepted by the District. As of June 30, 2021 and 2020, none of the outstanding developer agreements had been accepted. COVID-19 Pandemic On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the novel strain of coronavirus (COVID-19) a global pandemic and recommended containment and mitigation measures worldwide. The pandemic continued subsequent to year end with certain restrictions required by the Governor of California, as well as local governments, which may affect revenue sources and also caused subsequent stock market volatility. The duration of the pandemic and the future impact of COVID-19 on the District’s operational and financial performance is uncertain at this time. 52 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 10) RISK MANAGEMENT General Liability and Property The District is exposed to various risks of loss related to torts, theft, damage and destruction of assets, errors and omissions, and natural disasters. Beginning in July 2020, the District began participation as a member in an insurance pool through the Association of California Water Agencies Joint Powers Insurance Authority (ACWA JPIA). ACWA JPIA is a not-for- profit public agency formed under California Government Code Sections 6500 et. Seq. ACWA JPIA is governed by a board composed of members from participating agencies. The District pays an annual premium for commercial insurance covering general liability, excess liability, property, automobile, public employee dishonesty, and various other claims. Separate financial statements of ACWA JPIA may be obtained at ACWA JPIA 2100 Professional Drive, Roseville, CA 95661-3700. General and Auto Liability, Public Officials’ Errors and Omissions and Employment Practices Liability: Total limits of $5 million combined single limit at $5 million per occurrence, with excess aggregate coverage at $50 million subject to the following deductibles:  $50,000 per occurrence for third party general liability property damage;  $50,000 per occurrence for third party auto liability property damage; Employee Dishonesty Coverage: Total of $1,000,000 per loss includes Public Employee Dishonesty, Forgery or Alteration and Theft and Faithful Performance of Duty effective July 1, 2020. Property Loss: Replacement cost, for property on file, paid on an actual cash value basis, to a combined total of $500 million per occurrence, subject to a $1,000 deductible per occurrence, effective July 1, 2020. Boiler and Machinery: Replacement cost up to $100 million per occurrence, subject to a $1,000 deductible, effective July 1, 2020. Comprehensive and Collision: Deductibles of $1,000, as elected; ACV limits; fully self-funded by ACWA, effective July 1, 2020. Workers’ Compensation Coverage and Employer’s Liability: Statutory limits per occurrence for Workers’ Compensation and $2.0 million for Employer’s Liability Coverage, subject to the terms, conditions and exclusions as provided in the Memorandum of Coverage, effective July 1, 2020. Cyber Coverage: $5,000,000 Annual Aggregate Limit of Liability for each Insured/Member for Information Security & Privacy Liability. Policy includes $50,000 deductible per claim. 11) SEGMENT INFORMATION The District has issued Water and Wastewater Revenue Bonds in the current and previous fiscal years to finance certain capital improvements. While water and wastewater services are accounted for jointly in these financial statements, the investors in the Water Revenue Bonds rely solely on the revenues of the water services for repayment and the Wastewater Revenue Bonds solely on the revenues of the wastewater services for repayment. 53 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 11) SEGMENT INFORMATION - Continued Summary financial information for the water and wastewater services is presented for June 30, 2021 and 2020: Condensed Statements of Net Position June 30, 2021 and 2020 Water Services Wastewater Services 2021 2020 2021 2020 ASSETS Cash and Investments $ 87,912,162 $ 73,048,806 $ 4,480,939 $ 4,457,368 Accounts Receivable, Net 14,646,890 13,244,367 194,047 175,737 Other Current Assets 3,914,774 3,365,177 68,548 96,132 Net OPEB Asset - 19,191 - 830 Capital Assets 422,067,977 426,126,556 29,494,427 30,376,193 Total Assets 528,541,803 515,804,097 34,237,961 35,106,260 DEFERRED OUTFLOWS OF RESOURCES Deferred Actuarial Pension Costs 5,310,729 3,306,371 110,794 51,994 Deferred Actuarial OPEB Costs 2,357,742 1,094,697 81,890 44,838 Total Deferred Outflows of Resources 7,668,471 4,401,068 192,684 96,832 LIABILITIES Accounts Payable 14,666,147 16,040,522 69,579 183,595 Other Miscellaneous Liabilities 5,163,174 4,970,208 732,692 485,818 Other Current Liabilities 11,376,893 10,474,774 95,247 30,247 General Obligation Bonds 739,080 1,460,435 - - Revenue Bonds 102,442,795 107,381,011 3,042,012 3,106,551 Net Pension Liability 19,518,744 16,194,242 524,775 422,613 Net OPEB Liability 1,750,085 - 51,074 - Other Non-current Liabilities 3,793,011 3,550,571 - - Total Liabilities 159,449,929 160,071,763 4,515,379 4,228,824 DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES Deferred Actuarial Pension Costs - 1,323,207 - 43,451 Deferred Actuarial OPEB Costs 1,365,120 2,190,616 59,416 83,633 Total Deferred Inflows of Resources 1,365,120 3,513,823 59,416 127,084 NET POSITION Net Investment in Capital Assets 313,995,974 317,886,828 26,387,415 27,269,642 Restricted for Debt Service 4,187,443 4,261,399 - - Unrestricted 57,211,808 34,471,352 3,468,435 3,577,542 Total Net Position $ 375,395,225 $ 356,619,579 $ 29,855,850 $ 30,847,184 54 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 11) SEGMENT INFORMATION - Continued Condensed Statements of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Position For the Years Ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 Water Services Wastewater Services 2021 2020 2021 2020 Operating Revenues Water Sales $ 101,742,970 $ 90,435,148 $ - $- Wastewater Revenue - - 2,899,180 2,921,310 Connection and Other Fees 2,495,491 2,570,891 2,827 11,460 Total Operating Revenues 104,238,461 93,006,039 2,902,007 2,932,770 Operating Expenses Cost of Water Sales 66,889,570 62,573,257 -- Wastewater -- 2,633,413 2,439,117 Administrative and General 21,948,435 25,196,555 -- Depreciation 16,076,720 15,886,575 1,136,185 892,392 Total Operating Expenses 104,914,725 103,656,387 3,769,598 3,331,509 Operating Income (Loss) (676,264) (10,650,348) (867,591) (398,739) Non-operating Revenues (Expenses) Investment Earnings 246,906 1,734,364 7,762 50,470 Taxes and Assessments 5,249,898 4,939,950 1,642 - Availability Charges 634,887 645,996 51,810 48,772 Gain (Loss) on Sale of Capital Assets (159,734) (1,243,742) -- Rents and Leases 1,587,687 1,501,328 -- Miscellaneous Revenues 5,057,827 1,750,411 4,952 185,751 Donations (84,389) (121,600) -- Interest Expense (4,695,529) (4,903,602) (86,961) (50,385) Miscellaneous Expenses (197,587) (453,971) (43,792) (104,434) Total Non-operating Revenues (Expenses) 7,639,966 3,849,134 (64,587) 130,174 Income (Loss) Before Capital Contributions and Transfers 6,963,702 (6,801,214) (932,178) (268,565) Capital Contributions 11,644,043 6,825,909 108,745 116,023 Transfers In (Out) 167,901 193,829 (167,901) (193,829) Change in Net Position 18,775,646 218,524 (991,334) (346,371) Total Net Position, Beginning 356,619,579 356,401,055 30,847,184 31,193,555 Total Net Position, Ending $ 375,395,225 $ 356,619,579 $ 29,855,850 $ 30,847,184 55 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 11) SEGMENT INFORMATION - Continued Condensed Statements of Cash Flows For the Years Ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 Water Services Wastewater Services 2021 2020 2021 2020 Net Cash Provided/(Used) by: Operating Activities $ 19,202,814 $ 10,725,595 $ 362,894 $ 586,205 Non-capital and Related Financing Activities 5,286,158 5,035,871 (116,091) (145,056) Capital and Related Financing Activities (9,989,088) (17,036,778) (230,994) 1,386,775 Investing Activities 437,895 17,445,293 7,762 2,629,444 Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents 14,937,779 16,169,981 23,571 4,457,368 Cash and Cash Equivalents, Beginning 69,308,286 53,138,305 4,457,368 - Cash and Cash Equivalents, Ending $ 84,246,065 $ 69,308,286 $ 4,480,939 $ 4,457,368 CREQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 56 Schedule of Changes in the Net OPEB Liability and Related Ratios for Measurement Periods Ended June 30, Measurement Period 2020 2019 2018 2017 Total OPEB Liability Service Cost $ 735,529 $ 757,725 $ 735,655 $ 687,528 Interest on the Total OPEB Liability 1,915,358 1,970,613 1,864,967 1,764,343 Actual and Expected Experience Difference 1,151,927 (2,029,118) - - Changes in Assumptions - (345,110) - - Changes in Benefit Terms - - - - Benefit Payments (1,120,146) (1,141,344) (1,085,586) (1,039,420) Net Change in Total OPEB Liability 2,682,668 (787,234) 1,515,036 1,412,451 Total OPEB Liability - Beginning 27,177,329 27,964,563 26,449,527 25,037,076 Total OPEB Liability - Ending (a) $ 29,859,997 $ 27,177,329 $ 27,964,563 $ 26,449,527 Plan Fiduciary Net Position Contributions - Employer $ 1,011,358 $ 2,206,363 $ 2,202,004 $ 2,284,420 Net Investment Income 983,790 1,595,092 1,734,626 2,011,985 Benefit Payments (1,120,146) (1,141,344) (1,085,586) (1,039,420) Administrative Expenses (13,514) (12,299) (11,784) (10,167) Other Expenses - - (28,757) - Net Change in Plan Fiduciary Net Position 861,488 2,647,812 2,810,503 3,246,818 Plan Fiduciary Net Position - Beginning 27,197,350 24,549,538 21,739,035 18,492,217 Plan Fiduciary Net Position - Ending (b) $ 28,058,838 $ 27,197,350 $ 24,549,538 $ 21,739,035 Net OPEB Liability/(Asset) - Ending (a)-(b) $ 1,801,159 $ (20,021) $ 3,415,025 $ 4,710,492 Plan Fiduciary Net Position as a Percentage of the Total OPEB Liability 94.0% 100.1% 87.8% 82.2% Covered-Employee Payroll $ 13,538,959 $ 13,176,602 $ 12,677,000 $ 12,513,000 Net OPEB Liability/(Asset) as a Percentage of Covered- Employee Payroll 13.3% -0.2% 26.9% 37.6% Notes to Schedule: Historical information is required only for measurement periods for which GASB 75 is applicable. Future years’ information will be displayed up to 10 years as information becomes available. Contributions are determined by an actuarial valuation based on eligible participants’ estimated medical and dental benefits. REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 57 Schedule of Contributions Last Ten Fiscal Years’ Actuarially Contributions as a Determined Contributions in Percentage of Fiscal Contribution Relation to the Contribution Covered-Employee Covered-Employee Year (ADC) ADC Deficiency (Excess) Payroll Payroll 2018 $ 1,116,418 $ (2,202,004) $ (1,085,586) $ 12,677,000 17.37% 2019 $ 1,149,911 $ (2,206,363) $ (1,056,452) $ 13,176,602 16.74% 2020 $ 1,011,358 $ (1,011,358) $ - $ 13,538,959 7.47% 2021 $ 807,867 $ (807,867) $ - $ 13,917,932 5.80% Notes to Schedule: The actuarial methods and assumptions used to set the actuarially determined contributions for Fiscal Year 2021 were from the June 30, 2020 actuarial valuation. Also note, that some of the data from prior years were updated with the most current available information. Methods and assumptions used to determine contributions: Actuarial Cost Method Entry Age Normal Amortization Method/Period Level percent of payroll over a closed rolling 15-year period Asset Valuation Method Market value Inflation 2.75% Payroll Growth 2.75% plus merit Investment Rate of Return 7.00% per annum Healthcare Cost-trend Rates 6.00% HMO/6.00% PPO decreasing to 5.00% HMO/5.00% PPO Retirement Age Tier 1 employees - 2.7% at 55 and Tier 2 employees - 2.0% at 62. The probabilities of Retirement are based on the 2014 CalPERS Experience Study for the period from 1997 to 2011. Mortality Pre-retirement mortality and post-retirement mortality probability based on CalPERS Experience Study with mortality improvements using Mortality Improvement Scale MP2018. Historical information is required only for measurement periods for which GASB 75 is applicable. Future years’ information will be displayed up to 10 years as information becomes available. Contributions are determined by an actuarial valuation based on eligible participants’ medical and dental benefits. REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 58 Schedule of Changes in the Net Pension Liability and Related Ratios Last 10 Years1 Measurement Period2 2019-2020 2018-2019 2017-2018 2016-2017 TOTAL PENSION LIABILITY Service Cost $ 2,623,208 $ 2,586,911 $ 2,528,271 $ 2,556,902 Interest 10,043,778 9,638,674 9,168,092 8,836,284 Changes of Benefit Terms - - - - Changes of Assumptions - - (1,312,634) 7,308,486 Difference Between Expected and Actual Experience 260,337 1,183,213 461,917 (1,208,593) Benefit Payments, Including Refunds of Employee Contributions (7,017,816) (6,658,719) (5,995,949) (5,779,040) Net Change in Total Pension Liability 5,909,507 6,750,079 4,849,697 11,714,039 Total Pension Liability - Beginning 142,409,387 135,659,308 130,809,611 119,095,572 Total Pension Liability - Ending (a) $ 148,318,894 $ 142,409,387 $ 135,659,308 $ 130,809,611 PLAN FIDUCIARY NET POSITION Net Plan to Plan Resource Movement $ -$- $ (203) $- Contributions - Employer 2,437,119 36,706,983 4,441,517 4,105,810 Contributions - Employee 1,055,769 1,019,255 1,015,008 1,014,329 Net Investment Income 6,185,108 7,516,686 6,949,676 8,149,097 Benefit Payments, Including Refunds of Employee Contributions (7,017,816) (6,658,719) (5,995,949) (5,779,040) Administrative Expense (177,337) (62,278) (126,575) (109,029) Other Changes in Fiduciary Net Position -203 (240,367) - Net Change in Fiduciary Net Position 2,482,843 38,522,130 6,043,107 7,381,167 Plan Fiduciary Net Position - Beginning 125,792,532 87,270,402 81,227,295 73,846,128 Plan Fiduciary Net Position - Ending (b) $ 128,275,375 $ 125,792,532 $ 87,270,402 $ 81,227,295 Plan Net Pension Liability/(Asset) - Ending (a) - (b) $ 20,043,519 $ 16,616,855 $ 48,388,906 $ 49,582,316 Plan Fiduciary Net Position as a Percentage of the Total Pension Liability 86.49% 88.33% 64.33% 62.10% Covered Payroll $ 13,383,715 $ 12,892,655 $ 12,969,485 $ 12,829,415 Plan Net Pension Liability/(Asset) as a Percentage of Covered Payroll 149,76% 128.89% 373.10% 386.47% Continued 1 Measurement period 2019-20 (fiscal year 2020-2021) was the seventh year of implementation; therefore, only seven years are shown. 2 Historical information is required only for measurement periods for which GASB 68 is applicable Notes to Schedule: Benefit Changes: The figures above do not include any liability impact that may have resulted from plan changes which occurred after June 30, 2016. This applies for voluntary benefit changes as well as any offers of Two Years Additional Service Credit (a.k.a. Golden Handshakes). Changes of Assumptions: For the 2021, 2020, 2019 and 2017 fiscal years, there were no changes. For the 2018 fiscal year, the accounting discount rate reduced from 7.65% to 7.15%. For the 2016 fiscal year, amounts reported reflect an adjustment the discount rate of 7.5% (net of administrative expense) to 7.65% (without a reduction for pension plan administrative expense). In 2014, amounts reported were based on the 7.5% discount rate. REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 59 N Schedule of Changes in the Net Pension Liability and Related Ratios - Continued Last 10 Years1 DED JUNE 30, 2020 and 2019 Measurement Period2 2015-2016 2014-2015 2013-2014 TOTAL PENSION LIABILITY Service Cost $ 2,298,617 $ 2,250,860 $ 2,330,709 Interest 8,575,275 8,229,312 7,907,915 Changes of Benefit Terms - - - Changes of Assumptions -(1,996,819)- Difference Between Expected and Actual Experience (613,440) (981,200)- Benefit Payments, Including Refunds of Employee Contributions (5,448,218) (5,288,251) (4,885,406) Net Change in Total Pension Liability 4,812,234 2,213,902 5,353,218 Total Pension Liability - Beginning 114,283,338 112,069,436 106,716,218 Total Pension Liability - Ending (a) $ 119,095,572 $ 114,283,338 $ 112,069,436 PLAN FIDUCIARY NET POSITION Net Plan to Plan Resource Movement $ - $- $- Contributions - Employer 3,819,770 3,557,098 3,137,174 Contributions - Employee 1,010,337 1,007,023 1,074,954 Net Investment Income 369,214 1,601,760 10,874,999 Benefit Payments, Including Refunds of Employee Contributions (5,448,218) (5,288,251) (4,885,406) Administrative Expense (45,185) (83,511) - Other Changes in Fiduciary Net Position - - - Net Change in Fiduciary Net Position (294,082) 794,119 10,201,721 Plan Fiduciary Net Position - Beginning 74,140,210 73,346,091 63,144,370 Plan Fiduciary Net Position - Ending (b) $ 73,846,128 $ 74,140,210 $ 73,346,091 Plan Net Pension Liability/(Asset) - Ending (a) - (b) $ 45,249,444 $ 40,143,128 $ 38,723,345 Plan Fiduciary Net Position as a Percentage of the Total Pension Liability 62.01% 64.87% 65.45% Covered Payroll $ 12,767,963 $ 12,451,513 $ 12,276,578 Plan Net Pension Liability/(Asset) as a Percentage of Covered Payroll 354.40% 322.40% 315.42% 1 Measurement period 2019-20 (fiscal year 2020-2021) was the seventh year of implementation; therefore, only seven years are shown. 2 Historical information is required only for measurement periods for which GASB 68 is applicable REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 60 E 30, 2017 and 2016 Schedule of Plan Contributions1 Contributions in Relation to the Actuarially Actuarially Contributions as a Fiscal Determined Determined Contribution Percentage of Year Contribution2 Contribution2 Deficiency (Excess) Covered Payroll3 Covered Payroll3 2015 $ 3,557,098 $ (3,557,098) $ -$ 12,451,513 28.57% 2016 $ 3,819,770 $ (3,819,770) $ -$ 12,767,963 29.92% 2017 $ 4,105,810 $ (4,105,810) $ -$ 12,829,415 32.00% 2018 $ 4,441,517 $ (4,441,517) $ - $12,969,485 34.25% 2019 $ 4,906,983 $ (36,706,983) $ (31,800,000) $ 12,892,655 284.71% 2020 $ 2,437,119 $ (2,437,119) $ - $13,383,715 18.21% 2021 $ 2,765,952 $ (3,965,952) $ (1,200,000) $13,917,932 28.50% 1Historical information is required only for measurement periods for which GASB 68 is applicable. 2 Employers are assumed to make contributions equal to the actuarially determined contributions. However, some employers may choose to make additional contributions toward their unfunded liability. Employer contributions for such plans exceed the actuarially determined contributions. 3 Includes one year’s payroll growth assumption using 2.75% payroll growth assumption for fiscal years 2018-2020; 3.00% payroll growth assumption for fiscal years 2015-2017. Notes to Schedule: The actuarial methods and assumptions used to set the actuarially determined contributions for Fiscal Year 2020-21 were from the June 30, 2018 public agency valuations. Also note, that some of the data from prior years were updated with the most current available information. Actuarial Cost Method Entry Age Normal Amortization Method/Period For details see June 30, 2018 Funding Valuation Report Asset Valuation Method Actuarial Value of Assets. For details, see June 30, 2018 Funding Valuation Report Discount Rate 7.00% Inflation 2.50% Salary Increases Varies by Entry Age and Service Payroll Growth 2.75% Investment Rate of Return 7.00% Net of Pension Plan Investment and Administrative Expenses; includes Inflation Retirement Age The probabilities of Retirement are based on the 2017 CalPERS Experience Study. Mortality The probabilities of mortality are based on the 2017 CalPERS Experience Study. REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 and 2020 ,QGHSHQGHQW$XGLWRUV¶5HSRUWRQ,QWHUQDO&RQWURO2YHU)LQDQFLDO5HSRUWLQJDQGRQ &RPSOLDQFHDQG2WKHU0DWWHUV%DVHGRQDQ$XGLWRI)LQDQFLDO6WDWHPHQWV 3HUIRUPHGLQ$FFRUGDQFHZLWKGovernment Auditing Standards   %RDUGRI'LUHFWRUV 2WD\:DWHU'LVWULFW 6SULQJ9DOOH\&DOLIRUQLD   :HKDYHDXGLWHGLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWKWKHDXGLWLQJVWDQGDUGVJHQHUDOO\DFFHSWHGLQWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVRI$PHULFDDQG WKH VWDQGDUGV DSSOLFDEOH WR ILQDQFLDO DXGLWV FRQWDLQHG LQGovernment Auditing Standards LVVXHG E\ WKH &RPSWUROOHU*HQHUDORIWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVRIWKH2WD\:DWHU'LVWULFW WKH³'LVWULFW´ DVRI DQGIRUWKH\HDUHQGHG-XQHDQGWKHUHODWHGQRWHVWRWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVZKLFKFROOHFWLYHO\FRPSULVH WKH'LVWULFW¶VEDVLFILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVDQGKDYHLVVXHGRXUUHSRUWWKHUHRQGDWHG2FWREHU  ,QWHUQDO&RQWURO2YHU)LQDQFLDO5HSRUWLQJ  ,QSODQQLQJDQGSHUIRUPLQJRXUDXGLWRIWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVZHFRQVLGHUHGWKH'LVWULFW¶VLQWHUQDOFRQWURORYHU ILQDQFLDO UHSRUWLQJ LQWHUQDO FRQWURO  DV D EDVLV IRU GHVLJQLQJ DXGLW SURFHGXUHV WKDW DUH DSSURSULDWH LQ WKH FLUFXPVWDQFHVIRUWKHSXUSRVHRIH[SUHVVLQJRXURSLQLRQRQWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVEXWQRWIRUWKHSXUSRVHRI H[SUHVVLQJDQRSLQLRQRQWKHHIIHFWLYHQHVVRIWKH'LVWULFW¶VLQWHUQDOFRQWURO$FFRUGLQJO\ZHGRQRWH[SUHVVDQ RSLQLRQRQWKHHIIHFWLYHQHVVRIWKH'LVWULFW¶VLQWHUQDOFRQWURO  $deficiency in internal controlH[LVWVZKHQWKHGHVLJQRURSHUDWLRQRIDFRQWUROGRHVQRWDOORZPDQDJHPHQWRU HPSOR\HHV LQ WKH QRUPDO FRXUVH RI SHUIRUPLQJ WKHLU DVVLJQHG IXQFWLRQV WR SUHYHQW RU GHWHFW DQG FRUUHFW PLVVWDWHPHQWVRQDWLPHO\EDVLV$material weaknessLVDGHILFLHQF\RUDFRPELQDWLRQRIGHILFLHQFLHVLQLQWHUQDO FRQWUROVXFKWKDWWKHUHLVDUHDVRQDEOHSRVVLELOLW\WKDWDPDWHULDOPLVVWDWHPHQWRIWKH'LVWULFW¶VILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWV ZLOOQRWEHSUHYHQWHGRUGHWHFWHGDQGFRUUHFWHGRQDWLPHO\EDVLV$significant deficiency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¶VILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVDUHIUHHIURPPDWHULDO PLVVWDWHPHQWZHSHUIRUPHGWHVWVRILWVFRPSOLDQFHZLWKFHUWDLQSURYLVLRQVRIODZVUHJXODWLRQVFRQWUDFWVDQGJUDQW DJUHHPHQWVQRQFRPSOLDQFHZLWK ZKLFKFRXOGKDYHDGLUHFWDQGPDWHULDOHIIHFWRQWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWV +RZHYHUSURYLGLQJDQRSLQLRQRQFRPSOLDQFHZLWKWKRVHSURYLVLRQVZDVQRWDQREMHFWLYHRIRXUDXGLWDQG DFFRUGLQJO\ ZH GR QRW H[SUHVV VXFK DQ RSLQLRQ  7KH UHVXOWV RI RXU WHVWV GLVFORVHG QR LQVWDQFHV RI QRQFRPSOLDQFHRURWKHUPDWWHUVWKDWDUHUHTXLUHGWREHUHSRUWHGXQGHUGovernment Auditing Standards. Richard A. Teaman, CPA David M. Ramirez, CPA Javier H. Carrillo, CPA Bryan W͘Daugherty, CPA Joshua :͘Calhoun, CPA 4201 Brockton AveŶƵĞ Suite 100Riverside CA 92501 951.274.9500d> 951.274.7828 FAX www.trscpas.com Attachment C Purpose of this Report The purpose of this report is solely to describe the scope of our testing of internal control and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the effectiveness of the District’s internal control or on compliance. This report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards in considering the District’s internal control and compliance. Accordingly, this communication is not suitable for any other purpose. Riverside, California October 20, 2021  2FWREHU   %RDUGRI'LUHFWRUV 2WD\:DWHU'LVWULFW 6SULQJ9DOOH\&$   :HKDYHDXGLWHGWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVRIWKH2WD\:DWHU'LVWULFW WKH³'LVWULFW´ IRUWKH\HDUHQGHG-XQH 3URIHVVLRQDOVWDQGDUGVUHTXLUHWKDWZHSURYLGH\RXZLWKLQIRUPDWLRQDERXWRXUUHVSRQVLELOLWLHVXQGHU JHQHUDOO\ DFFHSWHG DXGLWLQJ VWDQGDUGV DQGGovernment Auditing Standards DV ZHOO DV FHUWDLQ LQIRUPDWLRQ UHODWHGWRWKHSODQQHGVFRSHDQGWLPLQJRIRXUDXGLW:HKDYHFRPPXQLFDWHGVXFKLQIRUPDWLRQLQRXUOHWWHUWR \RX GDWHG 0D\    3URIHVVLRQDO VWDQGDUGV DOVR UHTXLUH WKDW ZH FRPPXQLFDWH WR \RX WKH IROORZLQJ LQIRUPDWLRQUHODWHGWRRXUDXGLW  6LJQLILFDQW$XGLW0DWWHUV  Qualitative Aspects of Accounting Practices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¶V NQRZOHGJH DQG H[SHULHQFH DERXW SDVW DQG FXUUHQW HYHQWV DQG DVVXPSWLRQV DERXW IXWXUH HYHQWV &HUWDLQDFFRXQWLQJHVWLPDWHVDUHSDUWLFXODUO\VHQVLWLYHEHFDXVHRIWKHLUVLJQLILFDQFHWRWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVDQG EHFDXVHRIWKHSRVVLELOLW\WKDWIXWXUHHYHQWVDIIHFWLQJWKHPPD\GLIIHUVLJQLILFDQWO\IURPWKRVHH[SHFWHG7KHPRVW VHQVLWLYHHVWLPDWHVDIIHFWLQJWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVZHUH  0DQDJHPHQW¶VHVWLPDWHRIWKHIDLUYDOXHRILQYHVWPHQWVLVEDVHGRQLQIRUPDWLRQSURYLGHGE\ILQDQFLDO LQVWLWXWLRQV:HHYDOXDWHGWKHNH\IDFWRUVDQGDVVXPSWLRQVXVHGWRGHYHORSWKHIDLUYDOXHRILQYHVWPHQWV LQGHWHUPLQLQJWKDWLWLVUHDVRQDEOHLQUHODWLRQWRWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVWDNHQDVDZKROH  0DQDJHPHQW¶VHVWLPDWHRIFDSLWDODVVHWVGHSUHFLDWLRQLVEDVHGRQKLVWRULFDOHVWLPDWHVRIHDFKFDSLWDOL]HG LWHP¶VXVHIXOOLIH:HHYDOXDWHGWKHNH\IDFWRUVDQGDVVXPSWLRQVXVHGWRGHYHORSWKHFDSLWDODVVHWV GHSUHFLDWLRQLQGHWHUPLQLQJWKDWLWLVUHDVRQDEOHLQUHODWLRQWRWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVWDNHQDVDZKROH  0DQDJHPHQW¶V HVWLPDWLRQ RI WKH QHW SHQVLRQ OLDELOLW\ DQG UHODWHG SHQVLRQ GHIHUUHG RXWIORZV DQG LQIORZV RI UHVRXUFHV DUH EDVHG RQ DQ DFWXDULDO YDOXDWLRQ  :H HYDOXDWHG WKH NH\ IDFWRUV DQG DVVXPSWLRQV XVHG WR GHYHORS WKH QHW SHQVLRQ OLDELOLW\ DQG UHODWHG SHQVLRQ GHIHUUHG RXWIORZV DQG LQIORZVRIUHVRXUFHVLQGHWHUPLQLQJWKDWLWLVUHDVRQDEOHLQUHODWLRQWRWKHILQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWVWDNHQDV DZKROH Richard A. Teaman, CPA David M. Ramirez, CPA Javier H. Carrillo, CPA Bryan W͘Daugherty, CPA Joshua :͘Calhoun, CPA 4201 Brockton AveŶƵĞ Suite 100Riverside CA 92501 951.274.9500d> 951.274.7828 FAX www.trscpas.com Attachment D Management’s estimate of the net other post employment benefits (OPEB) liability and related OPEB deferred outflows and inflows of resources are based on an actuarial valuation. We evaluated the key factors and assumptions used to develop the net OPEB liability and related OPEB deferred outflows and inflows or resources in determining that it is reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole. Certain financial statement disclosures are particularly sensitive because of their significance to financial statement users. The most sensitive disclosures affecting the financial statements were: The disclosure of the fair value of investments in Notes 2 and 3 to the financial statements represents amounts susceptible to market fluctuation. The disclosure of capital assets in Note 4 to the financial statements is based on historical information which could differ from actual useful lives of each capitalized item. The disclosure of the defined benefit pension plan, the net pension liability and related pension deferred outflows and inflows of resources in Note 7 to the financial statements represents management’s estimate based on an actuarial valuation. Actual results could differ depending on these key factors and assumptions used for the actuarial valuation. The disclosure of other post employment benefits, the net OPEB liability and related OPEB deferred outflows and inflows of resources in Note 8 to the financial statements represents management’s estimate based on an actuarial valuation. Actual results could differ depending on these key factors and assumptions used for the actuarial valuation. The financial statement disclosures are neutral, consistent and clear. Difficulties Encountered in Performing the Audit We encountered no significant difficulties in dealing with management in performing and completing our audit. Corrected and Uncorrected Misstatements Professional standards require us to accumulate all known and likely misstatements identified during the audit, other than those that are clearly trivial, and communicate them to the appropriate level of management. None of the misstatements detected as of a result of audit procedures were material, either individually or in the aggregate, to the financial statements taken as a whole. Disagreements with Management For purposes of this letter, a disagreement with management is a financial accounting, reporting, or auditing matter, whether or not resolved to our satisfaction, that could be significant to the financial statements or the auditor’s report. We are pleased to report that no such disagreements arose during the course of our audit. Management Representations We have requested certain representations from management that are included in the management representation letter dated October 20, 2021. Management Consultations with Other Independent Accountants In some cases, management may decide to consult with other accountants about auditing and accounting matters, similar to obtaining a “second opinion” on certain situations. If a consultation involves application of an accounting principle to the District’s financial statements or a determination of the type of auditor’s opinion that may be expressed on those statements, our professional standards require the consulting accountant to check with us to determine that the consultant has all the relevant facts. To our knowledge, there were no such consultations with other accountants. Other Audit Findings or Issues We generally discuss a variety of matters, including the application of accounting principles and auditing standards, with management each year prior to retention as the District’s auditors. However, these discussions occurred in the normal course of our professional relationship and our responses were not a condition to our retention. Other Matters We applied certain limited procedures to management’s discussion and analysis and the required supplementary information section, which are required supplementary information (RSI) that supplements the basic financial statements. Our procedures consisted of inquiries of management regarding the methods of preparing the information and comparing the information for consistency with management’s responses to our inquiries, the basic financial statements, and other knowledge we obtained during our audit of the basic financial statements. We did not audit the RSI and do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on the RSI. We were not engaged to report on the introductory and statistical sections, which accompany the financial statements but are not RSI. Such information has not been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements, and accordingly, we do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on it. As part of the audit, we assisted with the preparation of the financial statements and related notes and State Controller’s report preparation. However, these services, does not constitute an audit under Government Auditing Standards and are considered nonaudit services. Management has reviewed, approved, and accepted responsibility for the results of these services. Restriction on Use This information is intended solely for the use of the Board of Directors and management of the District and is not intended to be, and should not be, used by anyone other than these specified parties. Very truly yours, ,1'(3(1'(17$&&2817$176¶5(3257 21$33/<,1*$*5(('8321352&('85(6    0U-RVHSK%HDFKHP &KLHI)LQDQFLDO2IILFHU 2WD\:DWHU'LVWULFW 6SULQJ9DOOH\&$   :HKDYHSHUIRUPHGWKHSURFHGXUHVHQXPHUDWHGEHORZRQHYDOXDWLQJWKHLQYHVWPHQWVRIWKH'LVWULFWDVRIDQGIRU WKHILVFDO\HDUHQGHG-XQH7KH'LVWULFW¶VPDQDJHPHQWLVUHVSRQVLEOHIRUHYDOXDWLQJWKHLQYHVWPHQWVRI WKH'LVWULFW  7KH2WD\:DWHU'LVWULFW WKH³'LVWULFW´ KDVDJUHHGWRDQGDFNQRZOHGJHGWKDWWKHSURFHGXUHVSHUIRUPHGDUH DSSURSULDWHWRPHHWWKHLQWHQGHGSXUSRVHZKLFKLVVROHO\WRDVVLVWWKH'LVWULFW¶VPDQDJHPHQWLQHYDOXDWLQJWKH FRPSOLDQFHZLWKWKH'LVWULFW¶VLQYHVWPHQWSROLF\IRUWKHILVFDO\HDUHQGLQJ-XQH7KLVUHSRUWPD\QRWEH VXLWDEOHIRUDQ\RWKHUSXUSRVH7KHSURFHGXUHVSHUIRUPHGPD\QRWDGGUHVVDOOWKHLWHPVRILQWHUHVWWRDXVHURI WKLV UHSRUW DQG PD\ QRW PHHW WKH QHHGV RI DOO XVHUV RI WKLV UHSRUW DQG DV VXFK XVHUV DUH UHVSRQVLEOH IRU GHWHUPLQLQJZKHWKHUWKHSURFHGXUHVSHUIRUPHGDUHDSSURSULDWHIRUWKHLUSXUSRVHV  2XUSURFHGXUHVDQGDVVRFLDWHGILQGLQJVDUHDVIROORZV   2EWDLQDFRS\RIWKH'LVWULFW¶VLQYHVWPHQWSROLF\DQGGHWHUPLQHWKDWLWLVLQHIIHFWIRUWKHILVFDO\HDU HQGHG-XQH  )LQGLQJ $W-XQHWKHFXUUHQWLQYHVWPHQWSROLF\ 3ROLF\ LVGDWHG0D\ 7KLVSROLF\ZDVUHYLHZHGDQGUHDSSURYHGZLWKQRUHYLVLRQVRQ0D\DQGZDV ODVWDPHQGHGRQ0D\DWWKHUHJXODUERDUGPHHWLQJ7KHUHIRUHWKHLQYHVWPHQW SROLF\LVLQHIIHFWIRUWKHWLPHSHULRGXQGHUUHYLHZ   6HOHFW  LQYHVWPHQWV KHOG DW \HDU HQG DQG GHWHUPLQH LI WKH\DUH DOORZDEOH LQYHVWPHQWV XQGHU WKH 'LVWULFW¶V,QYHVWPHQW3ROLF\  )LQGLQJ:HVHOHFWHGWKHIROORZLQJLQYHVWPHQWV)+/%0DWXULW\)+/%0DWXULW\ /RFDO$JHQF\,QYHVWPHQW)XQG /$,) DQG6DQ'LHJR&RXQW\3RRO$OO IRXULQYHVWPHQWVDUHDOORZDEOHDQGZLWKLQPDWXULW\OLPLWVDVVWDWHGLQWKH'LVWULFW¶V LQYHVWPHQWSROLF\DW-XQH7KHILUVWWZRLQYHVWPHQWV )+/% DUHDOORZDEOH XQGHUWKHLQYHVWPHQWSROLF\KRZHYHUVLQFHWKHVHWZRLQYHVWPHQWVDUHUHVHUYHDFFRXQWV UHODWHGWRWKH6HULHV$DQG%ERQGVWKH\DUHVXEMHFWWRWKHGHEWDJUHHPHQWVDQG QRWWKH'LVWULFW¶VLQYHVWPHQWSROLF\  Richard A. Teaman, CPA David M. Ramirez, CPA Javier H. Carrillo, CPA Bryan W͘Daugherty, CPA Joshua :͘Calhoun, CPA 4201 Brockton AveŶƵĞ Suite 100Riverside CA 92501 951.274.9500d> 951.274.7828 FAX www.trscpas.com Attachment E 2 3. For the four investments selected in #2 above, determine if they are held by a third party custodian designated by the District. Finding: The four investments examined are held by third party custodians, Union Bank of California, the State of California (LAIF) and the County of San Diego designated by the District in compliance with the District’s investment policy. Per discussion with the District’s management and evidenced by Union Bank of California’s statement, Union Bank does not act as a broker dealer for the District but acts as a custodial agent of the District holding the investments in a trust capacity. LAIF with the State of California and the County of San Diego pooled investment funds are external investment pools held by the respective governmental agency. 4. Confirm the par or original investment amount and market value for the four investments selected above with the custodian or issuer of the investments. Finding: No exceptions were noted as a result of our procedures except there was a variance from the market value for the County of San Diego Pool. The confirmation for the County of San Diego Pool had a market value of $56,463,691.34 while the District’s investment report had a market value of $56,420,000. 5.Select two investment earnings transactions that took place during the year and recompute the earnings to determine if the proper amount was received. Finding: Selected the following investment earnings transactions: interest earned on FHLB Bond on September 10, 2020 and interest earned on FHLB Bond on March 10, 2021. No exceptions were noted as a result of our procedures. 6.Trace amounts received for transactions selected at #5 above into the District’s bank accounts. Finding: No exceptions were noted as a result of our procedures. 7.Select five investment transactions (buy, sell, trade or maturity) occurring during the year under review and determine that the transactions are permissible under the District’s investment policy. Finding: We selected the following investment transactions: LAIF deposit/purchase of $4,800,000 in August 2020, San Diego County Pool deposit/purchase of $5,001,581.57 in August 2020, LAIF withdrawal of $2,800,000 in December 2020, LAIF deposit/purchase of $6,536,097.94 in April 2021, and San Diego Pool deposit/purchase of $10,086,621.94 in April 2021. Those transactions were permissible under the District’s investment policy. No exceptions were noted as result of our procedures. 8.Review the supporting documents for the five investments selected at #7 above to determine if the transactions were appropriately recorded into the District’s general ledger. Finding: No exceptions were noted as a result of our procedures. 3 We were engaged by the District to perform this agreed-upon procedures engagement and conducted our engagement in accordance with attestation standards established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. We were not engaged to and did not conduct an audit or review engagement, the objective of which would be the expression of an opinion or conclusion, respectively, on the investments of the District for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2021. Accordingly, we do not express such an opinion or conclusion. Had we performed additional procedures, other matters might have come to our attention that would have been reported to you. We are required to be independent of the District and meet our ethical responsibilities, in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements related to our agreed-upon procedures engagement. This report is intended solely for the information and use of the Board of Directors and senior management of the Otay Water District and is not intended to be and should not be used by anyone other than these specified parties. Riverside, California October 20, 2021 Otay Water District 2021 Audit Results Partner: Joshua J. Calhoun, CPA Manager: Richard A. Gallo Teaman, Ramirez & Smith, Inc. Richard A. Teaman, CPA David M. Ramirez, CPA Javier H. Carrillo, CPA Bryan P. Daugherty, CPA Joshua J. Calhoun, CPA 4201 Brockton Ave. Suite 100, Riverside CA 92501 951.274.9500 www.trscpas.com Attachment F Overview •Scope of Services •Auditors’ Opinion and Report •Financial Statement Highlights •Other Reports and Letters Scope of Services ▫Audit of the annual financial statements for the year ended June 30, 2021 in accordance with Generally Accepted Governmental Auditing Standards ▫Agreed-Upon-Procedures related to the District’s Investments. Auditor’s Opinion and Report ▫Audit of financial statements for the year ended June 30, 2021 ▫Management is responsible for preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements ▫Auditor’s responsibility is to express opinions on the financial statements to obtain reasonable assurance that financial statements are free from material misstatement. Issuing a Unmodified opinion for the financial statements for the June 30, 2021. Financial Statements Highlights: PENDING ACCOUNTING STANDARDS Financial Statements Highlights: Schedule of Changes in Net OPEB Liability Financial Statements Highlights: Schedule of Changes in Net Pension Liability Other Reports and Letters Internal Control Report Other Reports and Letters Agreed-upon Procedures Report - Investments Other Reports and Letters Governance Communication Letter (SAS 114 Letter) Questions STAFF REPORT TYPE MEETING:Regular Board MEETING DATE:November 3, 2021 SUBMITTED BY: Jose Martinez General Manager W.O./G.F. NO: N/A DIV. NO. N/A SUBJECT:General Manager’s Report GENERAL MANAGER •District’s Response to COVID-19 Pandemic – The COVID-19 pandemicemergency declarations and the social distancing orders have resultedin a portion of the District’s staff telecommuting. The District has had no impacts to its water supply and has maintained a continuity ofoperations and services during the challenging and dynamic environment. Staff continues to monitor and provide updates relatingto responding to this pandemic, as needed, including but not limitedto: water and wastewater services, supplies, operations, finances, and communication. The District is continuing to hold Board ofDirectors meetings via teleconference services in accordance with AB361, which provides public access to the meetings. The District remains committed to the safety of the public and itsemployees who continue to provide the public with essential services. A Safe Reopening Plan and a Social Distancing and Sanitation Protocolhave been implemented and are updated in accordance with County health guidelines including the recent emergency regulationsdiscussed in this report. Staff will continue to monitor and complywith all Federal, State, and Local orders and guidelines. As a note, throughout the pandemic, the District has had staff reporting to the office, as needed. This was necessary to maintainthe safe and reliable distribution of water and wastewater servicesto our customers. Given the most recent Cal/OSHA updates, the District has maintained a phased transition to a normal on-site workforce. If necessary, and on a case-by-case basis, the District will work with staff requiring COVID-19 related accommodations. Staffwill continue to monitor and provide updates as necessary. AGENDA ITEM 9 2 • Shortage Level 1 Drought Alert - On October 29, 2021, the Otay Water District declared a Shortage Level 1 Drought Alert under its Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP). This move follows Governor Gavin Newsom’s declaration on October 19th of a statewide drought and the October 28th vote of the San Diego County Water Authority Board of Directors to activate a Shortage Level 1 under its WSCP. A Shortage Level 1 Drought Alert urges customers to voluntarily reduce water use by 10%. The District is further calling for its customers to voluntarily reduce use by 15% to align with the Governor’s July 2021 Executive Order. Per the District’s WSCP, the existence of Level 1 may be declared by the District’s general manager. Level 1 also includes increased conservation messages and outreach efforts. The governor’s October 19th proclamation added eight counties not included in the previous drought state of emergency and requires local water suppliers to implement water shortage contingency plans that are responsive to local conditions and prepare for the possibility of a third dry year. The proclamation also authorizes the State Water Resources Control Board to ban wasteful practices, including the use of potable water for washing sidewalks and driveways. To educate its customers on the significance of Shortage Level 1 Drought Alert, staff distributed a news release. To assist in curtailing for more strict conservation measures later, staff will also inform its customers about water-use efficiency programs, classes, rebates, and resources through its newsletter, the website, social media, outreach to community and business organizations, and through other communications and outreach measures. Staff will continue to monitor state and regional direction for the potential need for extraordinary water conservation measures. • ACWA Board Officer Elections – The General Manager will be submitting a vote on behalf of the District for current ACWA Vice President Pamela Tobin for ACWA President and current ACWA Region 10 Vice Chair Cathy Green for ACWA Vice President. • The District Celebrates its 65th Anniversary - As 2021 comes to an end, the District is celebrating 65 years of providing reliable water, recycled water, and sewer needs to its customers. To maintain safety and health concerns for staff and the public due to the COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions, staff did not host any public or community events this year. However, staff is publishing an article in the fall issue of the Pipeline Newsletter and will promote the 65th anniversary through the website and social media. Included in the promotions will be a timeline on how the District was established and highlights of the District’s successes that have minimized rate increases throughout the years such as automated meter reader register change-outs, the leak detection program, conservation 3 successes during past droughts, using innovative technologies like the use of drones, completion of the 14-inch force main project, and more. ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES: GIS: • Recycle Main Drone Trial Flight – In advancement of the District’s drone program and seeking new efficiencies, staff has been collecting “living and as-builts” images and videos of its rural and Wildlife preserve areas and assets. Working with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), staff was recently permitted to conduct a fly-over of the District’s Recycle Main, which can be a time intensive inspection task given the federal reserve status of the surrounding land. Alongside staff from USFWS, District staff was able to conduct a trial flight in this area for the first time. USFWS reported no habitat disturbance concerns. The produced flight report will be evaluated by staff and its potential inspection application benefit. Human Resources: • Open Enrollment – Held October 12-29, and the Open Enrollment virtual employee meeting was held October 25th. • Employee Appreciation Meeting – In lieu of the annual in-person employee appreciation event, the District held two meetings through Zoom on October 13th. The General Manager and Chiefs recognized employees for key work and accomplishments. • Recruitments/New Hires/Promotions – The District is or will be recruiting for the following positions: o Customer Service Field Representative I/II o Customer Service Representative I/II o Construction Inspector I/II o Facilities Maintenance Technician o Human Resources Assistant I/II o Meter Maintenance Worker I/II o Pump Mechanic I/II o Senior SCADA or SCADA Instrumentation Technician o Utility Crew Leader o Utility Worker I/II (continuous posting) o Utility Locator o Water System Operator I/II/III 4 The District recently filled the following positions internally: o Utility Maintenance Assistant Supervisor o Warehouse Technician IT Operations: • ERP Needs Assessment - Staff is finalizing the scope of work for a needs assessment solicitation in replacement support of the District's current Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solution, Tyler Eden. The request includes an analysis of existing business processes, an assessment of the District's current and future ERP needs, process automation and efficiency, and the District's long- term financial and ERP integration strategy. Staff intends to submit a staff report for committee review in March 2022. • Monthly Cybersecurity Safeguards - The District’s public facing cyber environment is monitored and analyzed by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA). CISA evaluates the Agency's exposure to external threats once a month using external vulnerability scanning, risk assessment, and the architectural design report validation. The Agency continues to satisfy these criteria, according to the September evaluation. Purchasing & Facilities: • Salt Creek Golf Course Maintenance Building – In May of 2021, and on behalf of the District, Cal Auctions, LLC, through a public auction, sold the Salt Creek Golf Course maintenance building for the sum of $4,475.00. After a number of delays, the prefabricated steel & metal structure will be dismantled, removed, and eventually repurposed. The removal and cleanup are expected to be completed by the end of November. Safety & Security: • COVID-19 – Staff continues to monitor Cal/OSHA regarding the status of the permanent COVID-19 regulation. There have been no updates since the advisory meeting (public comment) on September 23rd. • HAZWOPER Team Chlorine Response Training - On September 30th, the HAZWOPER Team participated in the semi-annual chlorine response exercise. The exercises responded to SCADA alarms, reviewed the evacuation procedures and internal and external notifications. Members also inspected the HAZMAT suits, respirators, gas detectors, and other equipment in the response vehicle. The team 5 also practiced inspecting and repairing the one-ton chlorine gas cylinder using the Chlorine B Kits. • Meetings: o District Emergency Operation Center (EOC) - Staff met with System Operations to overview the District's EOC and reviewed past District-wide response events. o SDCWA Water Agency Emergency Collaborative (WAEC) Virtual Meeting – Staff attended the semi-annual WAEC meeting. • ACWA JPIA Property Site Inspections – The District’s ACWA JPIA Sr. Risk Advisor and Property Appraiser conducted property schedule site visits to ten (10) facilities, including the Administration Building, Operations Center, pump stations, and several reservoirs. Staff facilitated the tours and answered questions regarding the operations and other related best practices related to security, safety, and risk exposures. This was also an opportunity for ACWA JPIA to better understand the operational elements of the District facilities. FINANCE: • Collections and Bad Debt Exposure – Below is information that shows lockable accounts and differentiates Owner accounts from Tenant accounts. While the District collects a portion of these balances, it is less likely to collect the tenant account balances that have become lockable. This balance is being monitored on a weekly basis to assess the potential bad debt exposure. FY 2020 Remainder FY 2021Remainder FY 2022 Lockable Total Lockable Accounts Owner 129 800 867 205,805$ 163,557$ -$ 98,308$ 272,618$ 370,926$ Tenant 147 471 470 158,471$ 247,239$ 11,346$ 185,527$ 119,888$ 316,761$ Total 276 1,271 1,337 364,276$ 410,796$ 11,346$ 283,835$ 392,506$ 687,687$ Typical Monthly Values 200 **Actual Sales 40,861,103$ 101,742,970$ 20,510,081$ Percent of Bad Debt Exposure 0.03%0.28%1.91% FY2021 Waived Penalties*841,697$ -$ -$ 4,729$ There are three recycle accounts with a lockable balance. *The District reinstated penalities as of July 1, 2021. Note: Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic the lockable balance was $48,500. Lockable $'s From Recycled Accounts **FY 2020 Actual Sales only includes four months of sales, from the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020 to the end of the fiscal year. Collections and Bad Debt Exposure # of Accounts $'s March 2020 (31 Days)September 2021 (30 Days)October 2021 (25 Days) FY 2020 End of Year Lockable FY 2021 End of Year Lockable Lockable Balances as of October 2021 (25 Days) • FY 2022 Audit Services RFP – The current audit contract with Teaman, Ramirez & Smith, Inc. has expired, and the District is seeking 6 proposals from qualified audit firms to serve as the District’s auditor for FY 2022 with four (4) additional one-year options. Results from the RFP will be brought to the F&A Committee in December. The F&A Committee will select firms for interviews to be held in January 2022 so that a recommendation to the Board can be made in February. • MUFG-Union Bank Acquisition – Earlier this year, US Bancorp (US Bank) acquired the Custody and Trust line of business from MUFG-Union Bank. On September 21st, it was announced that US Bank entered into a definitive agreement to acquire MUFG-Union Bank’s core regional banking franchise. This acquisition will now result in all the District’s banking functions (i.e., checking, payroll, lockbox) to transition from MUFG-Union Bank to US Bank. Details of the transition have not yet been issued by either bank. Staff will work closely with both banks to ensure a smooth transition. The transition of the Custody and Trust accounts, which took place earlier this year from MUFG-Union Bank to US Bank, was executed seamlessly without any issues and staff does not anticipate any disruption with the upcoming move to US Bank. • State Water Arrearages Program – The application process to apply for state water arrearage funds is open until December 6th. District staff is currently working on the application. Funds provided will be credited to customer accounts with past due balances for water charges from March 4, 2020 through June 15, 2021. Customers who receive this credit will be notified in writing by the District. Customers will be offered payment arrangements on any remaining balances they may have on their accounts. Financial Reporting: • The financial reporting for September 30, 2021 is as follows: o For the third month ending September 30, 2021, there are total revenues of $32,207,321 and total expenses of $31,189,427. The revenues exceeded expenses by $1,017,894. • The financial reporting for investments for September 30, 2021 is as follows: o The market value shown in the Portfolio Summary and in the Investment Portfolio Details as of September 30, 2021 total $89,219,856 with an average yield to maturity of 0.564%. The total earnings year to date are $132,239. 7 ENGINEERING AND WATER SYSTEM OPERATIONS: Engineering: • 870-2 Pump Station Replacement: This project consisted of a new Pump Station to replace the existing Low Head 571-1 and High Head 870-1 Pump Stations. The project also included the replacement of the existing liner and cover for the 571-1 Reservoir (36.7 MG). The newly operational Pump Station has four (4) pumps, two (2) electric motor driven and two (2) external gas engine driven motor/pump combinations. On June 29, 2020, Pacific Hydrotech, the Pump Station’s contractor, achieved substantial completion. The 7-day test was finalized, and the project accepted as complete on August 25, 2021. The project was completed within budget and the Notice of Completion was recorded with the County of San Diego as of October 7, 2021, the warranty will be in effect through October 6, 2022, and the retention is anticipated to be released November 5, 2021. (P2083 & P2562) • Temporary Lower Otay Pump Station Redundancy: This project added a second pump to the District’s existing Temporary Lower Otay Pump Station (TLOPS) to provide redundancy. Substantial completion was achieved on April 5, 2021. The project is within budget and a Notice of Completion was recorded with the County of San Diego on August 5, 2021. Retention payment has been released and the District received Tharsos’ certified claim on August 30, 2021 for COVID impacts to recoup the $121K collected in liquidated damages. Per the contract specification, the Engineer’s Final Determination was provided to Tharsos on Friday, September 17, 2021. Tharsos, per the contract, notified the District on September 24, 2021 of their objection to the final determination and has filed a request for Non-Binding Mediation. District Counsel and Tharsos Counsel have settled on Bernard Kamine as mediator for this case and are working with the American Arbitration Association and Mr. Kamine to set a date for mediation to commence. (P2619) • Vista Diego Hydropneumatic Pump Station Replacement: This project includes replacement of the existing Pump Station, which serves the small 1530 Pressure Zone, containing approximately thirty-seven (37) potable water meters and four (4) hydrants. District staff has been working with the design consultant, Murraysmith, to develop and select a replacement concept for preliminary design coordinated with a separate CIP project (P2680) to replace distribution piping in Vista Diego Road. District staff provided comments on Murraysmith’s revised preliminary design report on August 9, 2021. This project is on schedule and within budget. (P2639) • 1090-1 Pump Station Renovation: This project includes renovation of the existing Pump Station, including pump replacement and addition of a third pump, which serves the small 1090 Pressure Zone, containing approximately thirty-three (33) potable water meters and seven (7) 8 hydrants. Award of the contract to Cora Constructors was authorized at the November 2020 Board Meeting. Notice to proceed was issued on January 8, 2021. The procurement of long-lead items occurred initially, and construction began on May 20, 2021. Pump motors were damaged during transportation, which has delayed completion of the work. During the electrical service replacement, the District will have the trailer mounted motor driven Pioneer pump available in the event the work is not completed in a timely manner. This project is currently behind schedule but within budget. (P2174) • RWCWRF Disinfection System Improvements: The project involves the replacement of the chlorine gas disinfection system with an ultraviolet (UV) process at the Ralph W. Chapman Water Reclamation Facility. Consultant selection for design and construction support to Carollo Engineers was approved by the Board at the June 2021 Board Meeting. Design work initiated in July 2021. Monitoring of ultraviolet transmittance is in progress for sizing the proposed system. Initial contact with the regulating state agencies has been made. Information on available equipment manufacturers has been received and is being reviewed with further investigations by staff. Preparation of the preliminary design report is in progress. (R2117) • Melrose Ave and Oleander Ave PRSs and 980 Reservoirs Altitude Valve Vaults: This project involves the replacement of two (2) 1960’s era pressure reducing stations in Chula Vista. The 340 Pressure Zone is a closed system with no storage, requiring pressure relief capabilities at each station. The project was advertised in February 2021 with it packaged with renovations to the 980-1 & -2 Reservoirs altitude valve vaults. The valves and piping have significant corrosion impacts, with new corrosion protection included in the design. The Board approved awarding a contract to CCL Contracting at the May Board Meeting. Submittal review started in June and a Notice to Proceed was issued on July 1, 2021, with a project completion date of March 28, 2022. This project is currently on schedule and within budget. (P2605, P2627, & P2671) • Olympic Parkway Recycled Water Line Replacement: Several main breaks within the past year of the 20-inch recycled water line in Olympic Parkway between Heritage Road and La Media Road resulted in the establishment of this Capital Improvement Program Project at the May 2021 Board meeting. The engineering firm, NV5, has been selected to design the replacement waterline using the District’s As-Needed Engineering Design Services contract. A draft of the preliminary design report has been received and reviewed by staff, with alternatives for potentially using trenchless installation being considered. (R2159) • 850-1 & 1200-1 Reservoirs Interior/Exterior Coating and Upgrades: This project consists of removing and replacing the interior and 9 exterior coatings of the 850-1 (1.15 MG) and the 1200-1 (1.0 MG) Reservoirs, along with providing structural upgrades, to ensure the tanks comply with both state and federal OSHA standards as well as the American Water Works Association and the Health Department standards. Capital Industrial Coatings, Inc. (Capital) completed the structural work, interior, and exterior coating on the 850-1 Reservoir. The contractor is performing final cleanup and the Reservoir is expected to be returned to service in November 2021. Capital has completed the structural upgrades, and the internal coating replacement on the 1200-1 Reservoir. They are currently working on replacing the exterior coating, but have experienced delays associated with containment and exterior coating removal. The project is behind schedule but within budget. (P2543 & P2533) • 1655-1 Reservoir & Rancho Jamul Hydropneumatic Pump Station: This project consists of constructing a new 0.5 MG prestressed concrete potable water tank in Jamul and modifying the existing Rancho Jamul Hydropneumatic Pump Station (HPS) to become the permanent Pump Station to feed the new 1655-1 Reservoir. The project also includes replacing approximately 1,500 linear feet of existing pipe that will be experiencing pressure over the rated pressure class under the new configuration. At the May 2021 Board Meeting, Richard Brady and Associates (Brady) was awarded a professional services agreement to be the design engineer on the project. A Kickoff Meeting was held on June 9, 2021, and the design is estimated to be completed in the summer of 2022. Brady has begun the survey and utility requests from the other agencies. The Pump Station analysis has also begun. The project is on schedule and within budget. (P2040 & P2642) • Campo Road Sewer Replacement Project: Wier Construction (Wier) submitted a claim binder on July 13, 2021, with a total claim of $3,252,075.87 for construction items, administrative costs, and estimated attorney fees associated with the completed Campo Road Sewer project. The project was accepted as complete on June 26, 2020, and the Notice of Completion was filed with the County on July 20, 2020. All seven (7) change orders were signed by Wier Construction and all fifty-five (55) weekly meeting agendas documented that Wier stated, “no disputed work or claims”. The Legal Counsel approved claim denial was sent to Wier on August 3, 2021. The Wier requested meet and confer meeting was held on August 31, 2021. A claim denial response to the meet and confer meeting was sent to Wier Construction via certified mail on September 10, 2021. Wier Construction has requested mediation and Ronald Prager has been agreed upon as a mediator for the claim. District and Wier Counsel are working to schedule the mediation. (S2024) • 458-1 & Reservoir Interior/Exterior Coating and Upgrades: This project consists of removing and replacing the interior and exterior coatings of the 458-1 (0.8 MG) Reservoir, along with providing 10 structural upgrades, to ensure the tank complies with both state and federal OSHA standards as well as the American Water Works Association and the Health Department standards. The design was completed in August 2021 and was advertised for construction on September 9, 2021. The bid opening was held on September 30, 2021, and five (5) bids were received. Advanced Industrial Services submitted the lowest bid. The construction contract award is scheduled to go to the November 3, 2021 Board meeting. The project is on schedule and within budget. (P2593) • Water Facilities Master Plan (WFMP) and Program Environmental Impact Report (PEIR) Update: The WFMP is periodically updated to identify and provide planning and design data for future potable and recycled water capital improvement projects. A kick-off meeting with the WFMP and PEIR Update consultant (Hazen and Sawyer) was held October 6, 2021. (P1210) • As-needed Strategic Project Funding Coordination Consulting Services: The District has entered into a contract with Hoch Consulting to provide as-needed services for identification of funding opportunities, application assistance, and post-award administration. Hoch Consulting has assisted several agencies in southern California in procuring grants, including SDCWA, Olivenhain MWD, Rainbow MWD, and the City of Oceanside. Hosh is currently working with staff on the preparation of an application for a Water & Energy Efficiency Grant under the Bureau of Reclamation’s WaterSMART program, which is due on November 3, 2021. (various CIPs) • FY 2022 Sewage Flows to Metro vs Planned Capacity: The Amended and Restated Agreement was signed by the City on July 22, 2021. The effective date of the agreement is August 22, 2021, one month after the agreement was signed. Per the terms of the agreement, tracking for flow, chemical oxygen demand, and suspended solids begin Fiscal Year 2023, the year after the effective date of the agreement. The treatment plant was operating normally to begin the new fiscal year. At this time, no planned interruptions of operation are expected to cause the District to exceed the planned Metro capacity of 139 MG (0.38 MGD) that goes into effect with the Metro amended agreement. 11 • Summary of Budgeted and Sold Meters and EDUs for Fiscal Year 2022 through September 30, 2021: Water System Operations (reporting for September): • On Wednesday, September 1st, staff assisted Pump and Electric and SCADA to put in service the new hydro pneumatic tank at 1655 Hydro Station. • On Tuesday, September 7th, the Engineering Inspection section performed a planned shutdown on a recycled 8-inch main on Medical Center Court in Chula Vista, to relocate 2-inch blow off. Two irrigation meters were affected for 24 hours. Customers were notified of the planned outage. • On Wednesday, September 22nd, Disinfection staff scheduled a tour to Santa Margarita Water District for October 26th to look at equipment for the aqua ammonia conversion. • The following events occurred on Thursday, September 23rd: o Staff isolated pump #4 at the 1655 Hydro Station due to leak on a mechanical seal. Pump and Electric staff are expecting to complete the repair on October 7th or October 8th. Date Meters (Budgeted) Meters Sold (Actual) EDUs (Budgeted) EDUs Sold (Actual) Total $ Collected (Budgeted) Total $ Collected (Actual) September 2021 15 28 25.3 101.5 $256,458 $1,115,128 Totals FY 2022 45 47 75.8 205.5 $769,375 $2,360,299 12 o Staff performed mock shutdown, requested by Inspections section, on a 16-inch water main running under 905 HWY by Roll Drive in Otay Mesa, for a future tie in with minimal leak by. • On Wednesday, September 29th, staff loaded, flushed, and sampled 24-inch main running down Alta Road in Otay Mesa, to tie in 12-inch main for new development near the TJ connection. Purchases and Change Orders: • The following table summarizes purchases and change orders issued during the period from September 16, 2021 through October 15, 2021 that were within staff signatory authority: Date Action Amount Contractor/ Consultant/Vendor Project 09/16/2021 P.O. $11,994.56 CORE & MAIN LP MASTER METER ALLEGRO 09/21/2021 P.O. $70,000.00 COFFMAN ENGINEERS, INC. CORROSION SERVICES FY 2022 09/21/2021 P.O. $70,000.00 RFYEAGER ENGINEERING, LLC CORROSION SERVICES FY 2022 09/27/2021 P.O. $2,499.55 WESTERN AUDIO VISUAL OUTSIDE SERVICES 10/01/2021 P.O. $5,500.00 POSM SOFTWARE, LLC PIPELINE OBSERVATION SYS. MANAGEMENT ANNUAL LICENSE 10/05/2021 P.O. $85,633.83 ASSOCIATION OF CA WATER AGENCIES FY2022 WORKERS' COMP PROGRAM (QUARTER 1) 10/05/2021 P.O. $52,100.00 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS RESEARCH ESRI EEAP ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION 10/07/2021 P.O. $65,000.00 HOCH CONSULTING, APC PROJECT FUNDING SERVICES FY 2022/2023 10/15/2021 P.O. $7,500.00 SECURITAS SECURITY SVC USA, INC ON-DEMAND SECURITY RESPONSE 13 Water Conservation and Sales: • Water Conservation – September 2021 usage was 16% lower than September 2013 usage. Since September 2020, customers have saved an average of 8% over 2013 levels. • Conservation 2020 vs 2021 – On July 8, 2021, Governor Gavin Newsom called on Californians to voluntarily reduce water use by 15%. The chart below shows the difference in usage for July-September 2020 and July-September 2021. Total conservation between 2020 and 2021 is 1%. 14 • Potable Water Purchases – The September potable water purchases were 2,800 acre-feet, which is 5% below the budget of 2,963 acre-feet. Year-to-date potable purchases through September were 8,938 acre- feet, which is 2% above the budget of 8,734 acre-feet. For September, actual rainfall of 0.50 inches exceeded the historic average rainfall of 0.04 inches. Actual year-to-date rainfall of 0.73 inches exceeded the historic average rainfall of 0.12 inches. • Recycled Water Purchases – The September recycled water purchases from the City of San Diego and production at the District’s treatment facility were 475 acre-feet, which is nearly equivalent to the budget of 471 acre-feet. Year-to-date recycled purchases and production through September were 1,477 acre-feet, which is 2.7% above the budget of 1,438 acre-feet. 15 Potable, Recycled, and Sewer (Reporting up to the month of August): • Total number of potable water meters: 51,355. • Total number of sewer connections: 4,740. • Recycled water consumption for the month of September: o Total consumption: 473.90 acre-feet or 154,411,884 gallons o Average daily consumption: 5,147,062 gallons per day o Total cumulative recycled water consumption since September 1, 2020: 1,482.5 acre-feet o Total number of recycled water meters: 763 • Wastewater flows for the month of September: o Total basin flow: 1,551,667 gallons per day  This is a decrease of 5.0 percent from September 2020. o Spring Valley Sanitation District flow to Metro: 517,222 gallons per day o Total Otay flow: 1,034,667 gallons per day o Flow processed at the Ralph W. Chapman Water Recycling Facility: 926,533 gallons per day o Flow to Metro from Otay Water District: 107,967 gallons per day o By the end of September there were 6,752 wastewater EDUs. Annual YTD REVENUES:Budget Actual Budget Variance Var % Potable Water Sales 55,548,600$ 17,738,610$ 17,314,000$ 424,610$ 2.5% Recycled Water Sales 9,681,500 3,710,553 3,658,500 52,053 1.4% Potable Energy Charges 2,574,900 832,815 795,900 36,915 4.6% Potable System Charges 17,393,000 4,268,807 4,257,000 11,807 0.3% Potable MWD & CWA Fixed Charges 13,505,000 3,314,913 3,312,000 2,913 0.1% Potable Penalties and Other Fees 912,000 221,898 228,000 (6,102) (2.7%) Total Water Sales 99,615,000 30,087,596 29,565,400 522,196 1.8% Sewer Charges 3,068,000 757,530 744,000 13,530 1.8% Meter Fees 74,000 42,016 18,600 23,416 125.9% Capacity Fee Revenues 1,976,000 556,266 494,100 62,166 12.6% Non-Operating Revenues 2,219,500 552,448 518,050 34,398 6.6% Tax Revenues 4,969,000 137,215 174,000 (36,785) (21.1%) Interest 236,000 74,250 59,100 15,150 25.6% Total Revenues 112,157,500$ 32,207,321$ 31,573,250$ 634,071$ 2.0% EXPENSES: Potable Water Purchases 40,446,000$ 12,379,801$ 12,096,100$ (283,701)$ (2.3%) Recycled Water Purchases 4,865,000 1,966,208 1,966,208 - 0.0% CWA-Infrastructure Access Charge 3,080,000 767,880 768,000 120 0.0% CWA-Customer Service Charge 1,817,000 441,840 441,900 60 0.0% CWA-Reliability Charge 2,867,000 696,450 696,450 - 0.0% CWA-Emergency Storage Charge 4,595,000 1,119,927 1,119,930 3 0.0% MWD-Capacity Res Charge 765,000 171,606 171,630 24 0.0% MWD-Readiness to Serve Charge 653,000 163,342 163,200 (142) (0.1%) Subtotal Water Purchases 59,088,000 17,707,054 17,423,418 (283,636) (1.6%) Power Charges 3,485,000 1,104,971 1,118,300 13,329 1.2% Payroll & Related Costs 22,048,500 5,757,102 5,835,900 78,798 1.4% Material & Maintenance 3,987,900 906,414 997,100 90,686 9.1% Administrative Expenses 6,890,800 1,578,374 1,711,830 133,456 7.8% Legal Fees 657,000 140,712 164,250 23,538 14.3% Expansion Reserve 2,066,900 516,700 516,700 - 0.0% Betterment Reserve 735,000 183,800 183,750 (50) (0.0%) Replacement Reserve 11,986,900 2,996,700 2,996,700 - 0.0% OPEB Trust 1,100,000 275,000 275,000 - 0.0% General Fund Reserve 90,500 22,600 22,600 - 0.0% Rate Stabilization Reserve 21,000 - - - 0.0% Total Expenses 112,157,500$ 31,189,427$ 31,245,548$ 56,121$ 0.2% EXCESS REVENUES(EXPENSE)-$ 1,017,894$ 327,702$ 690,192$ OTAY WATER DISTRICT COMPARATIVE BUDGET SUMMARY FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2021 F:/MORPT/FS2022-P3 10/20/2021 1:41 PM COMPARATIVE BUDGET SUMMARY NET REVENUES AND EXPENSES FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2021 ‐$1,400,000 ‐$1,200,000 ‐$1,000,000 ‐$800,000 ‐$600,000 ‐$400,000 ‐$200,000 $0 $200,000 $400,000 $600,000 $800,000 $1,000,000 $1,200,000 $1,400,000 $1,600,000  JUL  AUG  SEP  OCT  NOV  DEC  JAN  FEB  MAR  APR  MAY  JUN YTD Actual Net Revenues YTD Budget Net Revenues YTD Variance in Net Revenues The year-to-date actual net revenues through September show a positive variance of $1,017,894. OTAY WATER DISTRICT INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO REVIEW September 30, 2021 INVESTMENT OVERVIEW & MARKET STATUS: At the Federal Reserve Board’s regular scheduled meeting on March 15, 2020, the Committee lowered the target range for the federal funds rate from 1.50-1.750% to 0-0.25% in light of the effects of the coronavirus which harmed communities and disrupted economic activity in many countries, including the United States. There have been no further changes made to the federal funds rate at the most recent meeting which was held on September 22, 2021. The Committee anticipates maintaining the target range of 0-0.25% until labor market conditions have reached levels consistent with the Committee’s assessment of maximum employment and inflation has risen to 2 percent and is on track to moderately exceed 2 percent for some time. The Committee will continue to observe the effects of incoming information for the economic outlook. In determining the timing and size of future adjustments to the target range for the federal funds rate, they went on to say: “the Committee would be prepared to adjust the stance of monetary policy as appropriate if risks emerge that could impede the attainment of the Committee’s goals. The Committee’s assessments will take into account a wide range of information, including readings on public health, labor market conditions, inflation pressures and inflation expectations, and financial and international developments.” The District’s effective rate of return for the month of September 2021 was .57%, which was two basis points lower than the previous month. LAIF return was one basis points lower than the previous month, reaching an average effective yield of .21 for the month of September 2021. Based on our success at maintaining a competitive rate of return on our portfolio during this extended period of low interest rates, no changes in investment strategy regarding returns on investment are being considered at this time. In accordance with the District’s Investment Policy, all District funds continue to be managed based on the objectives, in priority order, of safety, liquidity, and return on investment. PORTFOLIO COMPLIANCE: September 30, 2021 Investment State Limit Otay Limit Otay Actual 8.01: Treasury Securities 100% 100% 0 8.02: Local Agency Investment Fund (Operations) $75 Million $75 Million $28.44 Million 8.03: Federal Agency Issues 100% 100% $ 3.76 Million 8.04: Certificates of Deposit 30% 15% 0 8.05: Short-Term Commercial Notes 25% 10% 0 8.06: Medium-Term Commercial Debt 30% 10% 0 8.07: Money Market Mutual Funds 20% 10% 0 8.08: San Diego County Pool 100% 100% 63.01% 12.0: Maximum Single Financial Institution 100% 50% 1.04% Jul FY21 Aug FY21 Sep FY21 1st Qtr FY21 Oct FY21 Nov FY21 Dec FY21 2nd Qtr FY21 Jan FY21 Feb FY21 Mar FY21 3rd Qtr FY21 Apr FY21 May FY21 June FY21 4th Qtr FY21 July FY22 Aug FY22 Sep FY22 1st Qtr FY22 LAIF 0.92 0.78 0.69 0.80 0.62 0.58 0.54 0.58 0.46 0.41 0.36 0.41 0.34 0.32 0.26 0.31 0.22 0.22 0.21 0.22 Otay 0.95 0.93 0.82 0.91 0.81 0.87 0.77 0.82 0.72 0.70 0.65 0.70 0.62 0.61 0.61 0.61 0.57 0.59 0.57 0.58 Difference 0.03 0.15 0.14 0.11 0.19 0.29 0.23 0.24 0.26 0.29 0.29 0.29 0.28 0.29 0.35 0.30 0.35 0.37 0.36 0.36 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 Re t u r n o n I n v e s t m e n t s Month Performance Measure FY-22 Return on Investment LAIF Otay Difference Target: Meet or Exceed 100% of LAIF $931,925 1.04% $84,878,719 94.76% $3,758,825 4.20% Otay Water District Investment Portfolio: 09/30/2021 Banks (Passbook/Checking/CD)Pools (LAIF & County)Agencies & Corporate Notes Total Cash and Investments: $89,569,469 (Book Value) Month End Portfolio Management September 30, 2021 Portfolio Summary % of Portfolio Book ValueInvestmentsMarket Value Par Value Days to MaturityTerm YTM 360 Equiv. YTM 365 Equiv. Federal Agency Issues - Coupon 3,758,824.73 1,4644.24 0.6161,4533,734,239.083,796,000.00 0.625 Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF)28,437,331.83 132.08 0.203128,439,691.2828,437,331.83 0.206 San Diego County Pool 56,441,387.03 163.68 0.730156,114,000.0056,441,387.03 0.740 88,637,543.59 100.00%Investments 88,287,930.3688,674,718.86 63 63 0.556 0.564 Cash (not included in yield calculations)Passbook/Checking 931,925.22 1 0.4131931,925.22931,925.22 0.419 89,569,468.81Total Cash and Investments 89,219,855.5889,606,644.08 63 63 0.556 0.564 Current Year September 30 41,887.90 Fiscal Year To Date 132,238.88 Average Daily Balance Effective Rate of Return 90,137,919.80 90,735,238.76 0.58%0.57% Total Earnings Month Ending I hereby certify that the investments contained in this report are made in accordance with the District Investment Policy Number 27 adopted by the Board of Directors on May 05, 2021. The market value information provided by Interactive Data Corporation. The investments provide sufficient liquidity to meet the cash flow requirements of the District for the next six months of expenditures. __________________________________________________ ____________________ Joseph Beachem, Chief Financial Officer Portfolio OTAY NL! APData Updated: SET_ME8: 10/20/2021 18:21 Reporting period 09/01/2021-09/30/2021 Run Date: 10/20/2021 - 18:21 PM (PRF_PM1) 7.3.0 Report Ver. 7.3.5 10/21/2021 YTM 360 Page 1 Par Value Book Value Maturity Date Stated RateMarket Value September 30, 2021 Portfolio Details - Investments Average BalanceIssuer Portfolio Management Month End Days to MaturityS&PCUSIP Investment # Purchase Date Federal Agency Issues - Coupon 0.612Federal Home Loan Mortgage2391 1,045,000.00 1,034,916.87 09/23/20250.37509/16/2021 1,027,997.85 AA3137EAEX3 1,453 0.618Federal Home Loan Mortgage2392 2,751,000.00 2,723,907.86 09/23/20250.37509/22/2021 2,706,241.23 AA3137EAEX3 1,453 3,758,824.733,734,239.083,796,000.002,429,691.04Subtotal and Average 0.616 1,453 BOND PROCEEDS (LAIF) 0.203STATE OF CALIFORNIA9015 0.00 0.00 0.2060.00LAIF 2018 1 0.000.000.000.00Subtotal and Average 0.000 0 Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 0.203STATE OF CALIFORNIA9001 28,437,331.83 28,437,331.83 0.20628,439,691.28LAIF 1 28,437,331.8328,439,691.2828,437,331.8327,837,331.83Subtotal and Average 0.203 1 San Diego County Pool 0.730San Diego County9007 56,441,387.03 56,441,387.03 0.74056,114,000.00SD COUNTY POOL 1 56,441,387.0356,114,000.0056,441,387.0356,441,387.03Subtotal and Average 0.730 1 90,137,919.80 88,674,718.86 0.556 6388,287,930.36 88,637,543.59Total and Average Portfolio OTAY NL! APData Updated: SET_ME8: 10/20/2021 18:21 Run Date: 10/20/2021 - 18:21 PM (PRF_PM2) 7.3.0 Report Ver. 7.3.5 YTM 360 Page 2 Par Value Book Value Stated RateMarket Value September 30, 2021 Portfolio Details - Cash Average BalanceIssuer Portfolio Management Month End Days to MaturityS&PCUSIP Investment # Purchase Date Union Bank 0.001STATE OF CALIFORNIA9002 9,127.49 9,127.49 0.0019,127.49UNION MONEY 1 0.000STATE OF CALIFORNIA9003 2,950.00 2,950.002,950.00PETTY CASH 1 0.444STATE OF CALIFORNIA9004 866,718.43 866,718.43 0.450866,718.43UNION OPERATING 1 0.000STATE OF CALIFORNIA9005 29,545.36 29,545.3607/01/2021 29,545.36PAYROLL 1 0.030STATE OF CALIFORNIA9010 4,239.30 4,239.30 0.0304,239.30RESERVE-10 COPS 1 0.030STATE OF CALIFORNIA9011 5,517.48 5,517.48 0.0305,517.48RESERVE-10 BABS 1 0.000STATE OF CALIFORNIA9014 13,827.16 13,827.1607/01/2021 13,827.16UBNA-FLEX ACCT 1 0.00 90,137,919.80 89,606,644.08 0.556 63 1Average Balance 89,219,855.58 89,569,468.81Total Cash and Investments Portfolio OTAY NL! APData Updated: SET_ME8: 10/20/2021 18:21 Run Date: 10/20/2021 - 18:21 PM (PRF_PM2) 7.3.0 Month End Activity Report Sorted By Issuer September 1, 2021 - September 30, 2021 Current Rate Transaction Date Balance Beginning Balance Ending Par Value Percent of Portfolio Par Value CUSIP Investment # Issuer Purchases or Deposits Redemptions or Withdrawals Issuer: STATE OF CALIFORNIA BOND PROCEEDS (LAIF) 0.00 0.00Subtotal and Balance Union Bank STATE OF CALIFORNIA9002 0.060.001 0.00UNION MONEY STATE OF CALIFORNIA9004 376,806.260.450 1,218,309.07UNION OPERATING STATE OF CALIFORNIA9005 0.00 0.07PAYROLL STATE OF CALIFORNIA9010 1,017,010.680.030 1,034,811.25RESERVE-10 COPS STATE OF CALIFORNIA9011 2,676,438.280.030 2,723,737.59RESERVE-10 BABS STATE OF CALIFORNIA9014 30.00 6,091.19UBNA-FLEX ACCT 4,982,949.171,844,589.11 931,925.22Subtotal and Balance 4,070,285.28 Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) STATE OF CALIFORNIA9001 6,600,000.000.206 5,600,000.00LAIF 5,600,000.0027,437,331.83 28,437,331.83Subtotal and Balance 6,600,000.00 10,670,285.28 10,582,949.1729,281,920.94 29,369,257.0532.776%Issuer Subtotal Issuer: Federal Home Loan Bank Federal Agency Issues - Coupon Federal Home Loan Bank2384 0.002.375 09/10/2021 1,005,000.00313378JP7 Federal Home Loan Bank2385 0.002.375 09/10/2021 2,645,000.00313378JP7 3,650,000.003,650,000.00 0.00Subtotal and Balance 0.00 0.00 3,650,000.003,650,000.00 0.000.000%Issuer Subtotal Issuer: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Federal Agency Issues - Coupon Federal Home Loan Mortgage2391 1,045,000.000.375 09/16/2021 0.003137EAEX3 Federal Home Loan Mortgage2392 2,751,000.000.375 09/22/2021 0.003137EAEX3 Portfolio OTAY NL! APData Updated: SET_ME8: 10/20/2021 18:21 Run Date: 10/20/2021 - 18:21 DA (PRF_DA) 7.2.0 Report Ver. 7.3.5 Current Rate Transaction Date Balance Beginning Balance Ending Par Value Page 2 Percent of Portfolio Par Value September 1, 2021 - September 30, 2021 Activity Report Month End CUSIP Investment # Issuer Purchases or Deposits Redemptions or Withdrawals 0.000.00 3,796,000.00Subtotal and Balance 3,796,000.00 3,796,000.00 0.000.00 3,796,000.004.236%Issuer Subtotal Issuer: San Diego County San Diego County Pool 56,441,387.03 56,441,387.03Subtotal and Balance 0.00 0.0056,441,387.03 56,441,387.0362.988%Issuer Subtotal 89,373,307.97 89,606,644.08Total 14,232,949.1714,466,285.28100.000% Portfolio OTAY NL! APData Updated: SET_ME8: 10/20/2021 18:21 Run Date: 10/20/2021 - 18:21 DA (PRF_DA) 7.2.0 Report Ver. 7.3.5 Month End Duration Report Sorted by Investment Type - Investment Type Through 09/30/2021 Investment #Security ID Issuer Investment Class Book Value Par Value Market Value Current Rate YTM Current Yield Maturity/ Call Date Duration Modified 360Fund Federal Home Loan Mortgage2391 99 1,045,000.00 1,027,997.853137EAEX3 0.791 09/23/2025 3.9351,034,916.87 0.612Fair .3750000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage2392 99 2,751,000.00 2,706,241.233137EAEX3 0.791 09/23/2025 3.9352,723,907.86 0.618Fair .3750000 STATE OF CALIFORNIA9015 99 0.00 0.00LAIF 2018 0.206 0.0000.00 0.203Fair .2060000 STATE OF CALIFORNIA9001 99 28,437,331.83 28,439,691.28LAIF 0.206 0.00028,437,331.83 0.203Fair .2060000 San Diego County9007 99 56,441,387.03 56,114,000.00SD COUNTY 0.740 0.00056,441,387.03 0.730Fair .7400000 0.570 0.16688,637,543.59 88,674,718.86 88,287,930.36Report Total Portfolio OTAY NL! AP Page 1 Data Updated: SET_ME8: 10/20/2021 18:21 Run Date: 10/20/2021 - 18:21 DU (PRF_DU) 7.1.1 Report Ver. 7.3.5 Month End GASB 31 Compliance Detail Sorted by Fund - Fund September 1, 2021 - September 30, 2021 Investment #Maturity Date Beginning Invested Value Purchase of Principal Investment ClassFundCUSIP Adjustment in Value Ending Invested Value Addition to Principal Redemption of Principal Amortization Adjustment Change in Market Value Fund: Treasury Fund 2391 0.00Fair Value 09/23/2025 -6,813.4099 1,027,997.853137EAEX3 1,034,811.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 2392 0.00Fair Value 09/23/2025 -17,496.3699 2,706,241.233137EAEX3 2,723,737.59 0.00 0.00 0.00 2385 2,646,534.10Fair Value 09/10/2021 -1,534.1099 0.00313378JP7 0.00 0.00 2,645,000.00 0.00 2384 1,005,582.90Fair Value 09/10/2021 -582.9099 0.00313378JP7 0.00 0.00 1,005,000.00 0.00 9004 1,708,221.24Amortized 0.0099 866,718.43UNION OPERATING 0.00 376,806.26 1,218,309.07 0.00 9005 29,545.43Amortized 0.0099 29,545.36PAYROLL 0.00 0.00 0.07 0.00 9001 27,439,608.31Fair Value 82.9799 28,439,691.28LAIF 0.00 6,600,000.00 5,600,000.00 0.00 9011 52,816.79Amortized 0.0099 5,517.48RESERVE-10 BABS 0.00 2,676,438.28 2,723,737.59 0.00 9010 22,039.87Amortized 0.0099 4,239.30RESERVE-10 COPS 0.00 1,017,010.68 1,034,811.25 0.00 9014 19,888.35Amortized 0.0099 13,827.16UBNA-FLEX ACCT 0.00 30.00 6,091.19 0.00 9015 0.00Fair Value 0.0099 0.00LAIF 2018 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 9002 9,127.43Amortized 0.0099 9,127.49UNION MONEY 0.00 0.06 0.00 0.00 9003 2,950.00Amortized 0.0099 2,950.00PETTY CASH 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 9007 56,619,000.00Fair Value -505,000.0099 56,114,000.00SD COUNTY POOL 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 89,555,314.42Subtotal -531,343.79 89,219,855.583,758,548.84 10,670,285.28 14,232,949.17 0.00 89,555,314.42Total 89,219,855.58-531,343.793,758,548.84 10,670,285.28 14,232,949.17 0.00 Portfolio OTAY NL! APData Updated: SET_ME8: 10/20/2021 18:21 Run Date: 10/20/2021 - 18:21 GD (PRF_GD) 7.1.1 Report Ver. 7.3.5 Month End Interest Earnings Sorted by Fund - Fund September 1, 2021 - September 30, 2021 Yield on Beginning Book Value Maturity Date Current Rate Ending Par Value EndingSecurity TypeFund Book Value Beginning Book Value Adjusted Interest Earnings AccretionAmortization/EarningsAdjusted InterestAnnualized YieldCUSIP Investment # Interest Earned Fund: Treasury Fund 1,034,916.872391 1,045,000.00 0.375FAC 09/23/2025 163.28 105.62 268.900.63299 0.003137EAEX3 2,723,907.862392 2,751,000.00 0.375FAC 09/23/2025 257.91 170.27 428.180.63899 0.003137EAEX3 0.002385 0.00 2.375FAC 09/10/2021 1,570.47 -584.78 985.691.51199 2,645,584.78313378JP7 0.002384 0.00 2.375FAC 09/10/2021 596.72 -222.20 374.521.51199 1,005,222.20313378JP7 866,718.439004 866,718.43 0.450PA1 755.91 0.00 755.910.53899 1,708,221.24UNION OPERATING 28,437,331.839001 28,437,331.83 0.206LA1 4,713.28 0.00 4,713.280.20999 27,437,331.83LAIF 5,517.489011 5,517.48 0.030PA1 27.35 0.00 27.350.63099 52,816.79RESERVE-10 BABS 4,239.309010 4,239.30 0.030PA1 5.33 0.00 5.330.29499 22,039.87RESERVE-10 COPS 9,127.499002 9,127.49 0.001PA1 0.01 0.00 0.010.00199 9,127.43UNION MONEY 56,441,387.039007 56,441,387.03 0.740LA3 34,328.73 0.00 34,328.730.74099 56,441,387.03SD COUNTY POOL 89,560,321.56Subtotal 89,523,146.29 0.578 41,887.90-531.0942,418.9989,321,731.17 89,560,321.56Total 89,523,146.29 0.578 41,887.90-531.0942,418.9989,321,731.17 Portfolio OTAY NL! APData Updated: SET_ME8: 10/20/2021 15:57 Run Date: 10/20/2021 - 15:57 IE (PRF_IE) 7.2.0 Report Ver. 7.3.5 Check Total 2,562.00 CHECK REGISTER Otay Water District Date Range: 9/23/2021 - 10/20/2021 Check #Date Vendor#Vendor Name Invoice Inv. Date Description Amount 2056776 10/20/21 15416 24 HOUR ELEVATOR INC 109362 10/01/21 ELEVATOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE 552.68 552.68 2056777 10/20/21 08488 ABLEFORCE INC 10513 10/19/21 SHAREPOINT & INTRANET SUPPORT SVCS 900.00 900.00 2056743 10/13/21 18122 ACC BUSINESS 212564028 09/27/21 INTERNET CIRCUIT SERVICES FY20-22 1,013.64 1,013.64 2056744 10/13/21 20963 ADRIANNA HUFFINE Ref002641153 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000241406 59.10 59.10 2056745 10/13/21 20964 ADRIANNA HUFFINE Ref002641154 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000241407 35.63 35.63 2056778 10/20/21 17989 ADS CORP 22446.22-0921 09/25/21 SEWER FLOW MONITORING FY22 750.00 750.00 2056779 10/20/21 07732 AIRGAS SPECIALTY PRODUCTS INC 9117791608 09/21/21 AS-NEEDED AQUA AMMONIA FY22 1,408.50 9117791609 09/21/21 AS-NEEDED AQUA AMMONIA FY22 673.50 9117791607 09/21/21 AS-NEEDED AQUA AMMONIA FY22 251.50 9117791610 09/21/21 AS-NEEDED AQUA AMMONIA FY22 228.50 2056684 09/29/21 20948 ALBERTO J RAMIREZ 7000092721 09/27/21 CUSTOMER REFUND 2,046.00 2,046.00 2056685 09/29/21 20936 ANA MUNOZ Ref002641057 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000232344 143.25 143.25 2056746 10/13/21 20969 ANGELICA MARTINEZ CASTANEDA Ref002641159 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000265867 40.03 40.03 2056686 09/29/21 08967 ANTHEM EAP 81194 10/01/21 EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM CY2021 960.21 960.21 2056687 09/29/21 17264 ARTIANO SHINOFF ABED 305324 09/21/21 PROF SERV - AUG 2021 46,121.00 46,121.00 2056747 10/13/21 20967 ASHLEY GRADEN Ref002641157 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000258091 61.04 61.04 2056688 09/29/21 20939 ASHLEY JAMES Ref002641060 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000257507 81.30 81.30 2056748 10/13/21 20199 ACWA-JPIA 100521 WC 09/30/21 FY2022 WORKERS' COMP PROGRAM (QTR 1)85,633.83 85,633.83 2056780 10/20/21 20199 ACWA-JPIA Member#Z010 10/01/21 GENERAL LIABILITY FY22 700,530.00 700,530.00 2056714 10/06/21 07785 AT&T 000017020282 09/12/21 TELEPHONE SERVICES (8/12/2021 - 9/11/2021)4,747.02 4,747.02 2056749 10/13/21 20956 AVITAL ATTISHA Ref002641146 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000084435 84.53 84.53 2056715 10/06/21 20125 AZTEC LANDSCAPING INC 1038IL 09/07/21 VEGETATION MITIGATION 34,800.00 34,800.00 2056781 10/20/21 08156 BROWNSTEIN HYATT FARBER 861509 10/07/21 LEGISLATIVE ADVOCACY CONSULTING SERV 3,977.00 3,977.00 2056750 10/13/21 20975 CARLTON THOMAS Ref002641165 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000272216 46.12 46.12 2056716 10/06/21 15177 CAROLLO ENGINEERS INC FB14780 09/17/21 DISINFECTION SYS IMPROVE (7/1/21-8/31/21)18,943.00 18,943.00 2056782 10/20/21 00234 CITY TREASURER 1000310933 08/25/21 TREATED WATER AND TRANSPORT (JULY 2021)11.99 11.99 Page 1 of 8 Check Total CHECK REGISTER Otay Water District Date Range: 9/23/2021 - 10/20/2021 Check #Date Vendor#Vendor Name Invoice Inv. Date Description Amount 1,068.00 14,696.51 20,635.21 4,590.00 1,162.10 2056783 10/20/21 04119 CLARKSON LAB & SUPPLY INC 22929 09/30/21 BACTERIOLOGICAL TESTING (9/8/21)324.00 22928 09/30/21 BACTERIOLOGICAL TESTING (9/7/21)252.00 22930 09/30/21 BACTERIOLOGICAL TESTING (9/21/21)216.00 22931 09/30/21 BACTERIOLOGICAL TESTING (9/22/21)138.00 22932 09/30/21 BACTERIOLOGICAL TESTING (9/22/21)138.00 2056717 10/06/21 16030 CORA CONSTRUCTORS INC 308312021 09/15/21 1090-1 PS RENOVATION (AUG 2021)84,360.00 84,360.00 2056718 10/06/21 18331 CORE & MAIN LP P462352 09/16/21 MASTER METER ALLEGRO & DMMR ANTENNAS 11,994.56 P601977 09/17/21 INVENTORY 2,701.95 2056784 10/20/21 18331 CORE & MAIN LP P580162 09/23/21 INVENTORY 9,413.04 P541895 09/30/21 INVENTORY 6,157.92 P576085 09/21/21 INVENTORY 5,064.25 2056689 09/29/21 15049 CORELOGIC SOLUTIONS LLC 82095483 08/31/21 DATA SERVICES 623.15 623.15 2056785 10/20/21 15049 CORELOGIC SOLUTIONS LLC 82099914 09/30/21 DATA SERVICES 540.75 540.75 2056691 09/29/21 00184 COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO 193E635550921 09/21/21 DEVELOPER PLAN CHECK (9/21/21)2,295.00 193E635540921 09/21/21 DEVELOPER PLAN CHECK (9/21/21)2,295.00 2056690 09/29/21 00134 COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO P2616092721 09/27/21 NOTICE OF EXEMPTION 50.00 50.00 2056719 10/06/21 00099 COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO DPWMWD0821 09/10/21 EXCAVATION PERMITS (AUG 2021)2,358.00 2,358.00 2056786 10/20/21 00184 COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO 193E634550921 10/14/21 SHUT DOWN TEST (9/2/21)612.00 193E602200921 10/04/21 SHUT DOWN TEST (8/27/21)205.00 193E633810921 10/04/21 DEVELOPER PLAN CHECK (9/14/21-9/20/21)195.50 193E635460921 10/04/21 DEVELOPER PLAN CHECK (9/14/21-9/21/21)149.60 2056720 10/06/21 04443 CSI SERVICES INC 10811 09/11/21 COATING INSPECTION SVC (JULY 2021)12,630.00 12,630.00 2056787 10/20/21 04443 CSI SERVICES INC 10823 09/21/21 COATING INSPECTION SVC (JULY 2021)7,950.00 7,950.00 2056721 10/06/21 11797 D&H WATER SYSTEMS INC 2021-1007 09/08/21 ACUTEC 35 MONITORS 3,265.11 3,265.11 2056788 10/20/21 11797 D&H WATER SYSTEMS INC 2021-1113 10/01/21 ACUTEC 35 MONITORS 1,886.49 1,886.49 2056692 09/29/21 20932 DANIEL PAGANO (AYNSLIE HANNA)Ref002641052 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000025591 118.22 118.22 2056751 10/13/21 20932 DANIEL PAGANO (AYNSLIE HANNA)Ref002641052 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000025591 118.22 118.22 2056752 10/13/21 06370 DAVID DEAN Ref002641145 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000053285 14.70 14.70 2056789 10/20/21 20987 DEBORAH GIANULIS 5108101821 10/18/21 CUSTOMER REFUND 1,415.33 1,415.33 Page 2 of 8 Check Total CHECK REGISTER Otay Water District Date Range: 9/23/2021 - 10/20/2021 Check #Date Vendor#Vendor Name Invoice Inv. Date Description Amount 1,326.55 7,422.32 26,313.17 201.83 2056789 10/20/21 20987 DEBORAH GIANULIS 5108101821 10/18/21 CUSTOMER REFUND 1,415.33 1,415.33 2056722 10/06/21 02447 EDCO DISPOSAL CORPORATION 5458093021 09/30/21 RECYCLED WASTE SERVICE FY22 107.11 107.11 2056790 10/20/21 20511 EYEMED (FIDELITY)164959266 09/20/21 VISION BENEFITS ADMIN (OCT 2021)1,287.93 164919916 08/20/21 VISION BENEFITS ADMIN (SEPT 2021 COBRA)22.15 164959447 09/20/21 VISION BENEFITS ADMIN (OCT 2021 COBRA)16.47 2056723 10/06/21 03546 FERGUSON WATERWORKS # 1083 0772609 09/10/21 INVENTORY 4,575.28 0769596-2 09/14/21 INVENTORY 2,142.99 0771944-1 09/14/21 INVENTORY 524.43 0772788 09/14/21 INVENTORY 179.62 2056791 10/20/21 03546 FERGUSON WATERWORKS # 1083 0774788 10/01/21 GATE VALVE 13,550.14 0774134 09/22/21 INVENTORY 7,515.56 0771944-2 09/27/21 INVENTORY 2,849.13 0773415 09/21/21 INVENTORY 1,957.32 0768560-2 10/01/21 HYDRANT PARTS 405.10 0772788-1 09/21/21 INVENTORY 35.92 2056792 10/20/21 17888 FIRST AMERICAN DATA TREE LLC 9003400921 09/30/21 DOCUMENT SERVICE (MONTHLY)99.00 99.00 2056724 10/06/21 05133 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE CO 82782741290 09/16/21 PRELIMINARY TITLE REPORT 1,080.00 1,080.00 2056793 10/20/21 02591 FITNESS TECH 11961 10/01/21 GYM EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 135.00 135.00 2056693 09/29/21 11962 FLEETWASH INC 2306396 09/03/21 FLEET WASH SERVICES FY 22 141.75 141.75 2056725 10/06/21 11962 FLEETWASH INC 2316105 09/17/21 FLEET WASH SERVICES FY 22 168.48 2308955 09/10/21 FLEET WASH SERVICES FY 22 33.35 2056753 10/13/21 11962 FLEETWASH INC 2295587 08/27/21 FLEET WASH SERVICES FY 22 206.86 206.86 2056794 10/20/21 11962 FLEETWASH INC 2321553 09/24/21 FLEET WASH SERVICES FY 22 116.74 116.74 2056694 09/29/21 20481 FRANCHISE TAX BOARD Ben2641094 09/30/21 BI-WEEKLY PAYROLL DEDUCTION 25.00 25.00 2056754 10/13/21 20481 FRANCHISE TAX BOARD Ben2641196 10/14/21 BI-WEEKLY PAYROLL DEDUCTION 25.00 25.00 2056795 10/20/21 20988 GARRETT PATZ 09052021 10/18/21 EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT - PATZ CLAIM 2,000.00 2,000.00 2056695 09/29/21 20946 GEO PACIFIC SERVICES INC Ref002641067 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000273316 1,087.82 1,087.82 2056755 10/13/21 20962 GEORGE OTENG Ref002641152 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000239469 32.66 32.66 2056726 10/06/21 12907 GREENRIDGE LANDSCAPE INC 21171 09/14/21 LANDSCAPING SERVICES (SEPT 2021)9,689.00 9,689.00 Page 3 of 8 Check Total CHECK REGISTER Otay Water District Date Range: 9/23/2021 - 10/20/2021 Check #Date Vendor#Vendor Name Invoice Inv. Date Description Amount 1,016.89 14,882.41 9,448.98 2056726 10/06/21 12907 GREENRIDGE LANDSCAPE INC 21171 09/14/21 LANDSCAPING SERVICES (SEPT 2021)9,689.00 9,689.00 2056756 10/13/21 20959 GUSTAVO KLUEVER Ref002641149 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000195801 83.29 83.29 2056727 10/06/21 00174 HACH COMPANY 12629282 09/07/21 FY22 MONOCHLORAMINE ANALYZER SUPPLIES 728.28 12635032 09/10/21 FY22 MONOCHLORAMINE ANALYZER SUPPLIES 288.61 2056728 10/06/21 19978 HASA INC.775397 09/07/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 2,378.95 778403 09/20/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 2,252.59 776261 09/10/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 1,755.66 776658 09/13/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 1,755.66 777603 09/16/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 1,533.32 776260 09/10/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 1,155.46 777604 09/16/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 786.10 775938 09/09/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 716.84 776264 09/10/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 704.69 776262 09/10/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 684.04 777282 09/15/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 267.30 777606 09/16/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 243.00 776263 09/10/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 235.71 777605 09/16/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 212.62 775936 09/09/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 200.47 2056796 10/20/21 19978 HASA INC.779710 09/27/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 1,750.80 779033 09/23/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 1,275.74 780417 09/30/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 1,093.49 780418 09/30/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 1,040.03 780899 10/04/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 901.52 779035 09/23/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 850.49 779034 09/23/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 766.66 780415 09/30/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 479.92 779037 09/23/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 437.40 779036 09/23/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 243.00 780190 09/29/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 208.98 778777 09/22/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 206.55 480416 09/30/21 AS-NEEDED SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE FY22 194.40 2056696 09/29/21 20941 HAZARD CONSTRUCTION INC Ref002641062 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000264754 1,673.82 1,673.82 Page 4 of 8 Check Total CHECK REGISTER Otay Water District Date Range: 9/23/2021 - 10/20/2021 Check #Date Vendor#Vendor Name Invoice Inv. Date Description Amount 18,697.73 135,696.57 2056696 09/29/21 20941 HAZARD CONSTRUCTION INC Ref002641062 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000264754 1,673.82 1,673.82 2056757 10/13/21 20970 HERIBERTO GONZALEZ Ref002641160 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000265970 13.79 13.79 2056758 10/13/21 20973 HERIBERTO LOPEZ Ref002641163 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000268583 8.52 8.52 2056797 10/20/21 16120 HMT LLC 23265072 09/27/21 SURGE TANK INSPECTION 7,370.00 7,370.00 2056729 10/06/21 13349 HUNSAKER & ASSOCIATES 2021080100 09/16/21 LAND SURVEYING SERVICES (7/31/21-8/27/21)601.45 601.45 2056730 10/06/21 08969 INFOSEND INC 198554 09/09/21 BILL PROCESSING SERVICES FY22 309.42 309.42 2056759 10/13/21 08969 INFOSEND INC 198082 08/31/21 BILL PROCESSING SERVICES FY22 1,272.89 1,272.89 2056798 10/20/21 08969 INFOSEND INC 199570 09/30/21 BILL PROCESSING SERVICES FY22 12,785.86 199569 09/30/21 BILL PROCESSING SERVICES FY22 3,258.21 199925 10/01/21 BILL PROCESSING SERVICES FY22 2,653.66 2056799 10/20/21 20752 IWG TOWERS ASSETS II LLC 408715139 10/01/21 ANTENNA SUBLEASE FY22 2,034.00 2,034.00 2056731 10/06/21 10563 JCI JONES CHEMICALS INC 866607 09/09/21 CHLORINE GAS 3,333.64 3,333.64 2056760 10/13/21 20968 JERMANY DIAZ Ref002641158 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000265553 30.51 30.51 2056761 10/13/21 20958 JOHN HOUDEK Ref002641148 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000159764 5.97 5.97 2056697 09/29/21 20944 JORGE RAMIREZ Ref002641065 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000265540 60.44 60.44 2056698 09/29/21 20949 KEITH DAVENPORT 4517092721 09/27/21 CUSTOMER REFUND 276.27 276.27 2056762 10/13/21 20960 KELVIN HARKINS Ref002641150 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000217361 119.34 119.34 2056800 10/20/21 05840 KIRK PAVING INC 21-172-2 09/29/21 AS-NEEDED EMERGENCY PAVING SVCS FY22 114,923.68 21-172-1 09/29/21 AS-NEEDED EMERGENCY PAVING SVCS FY22 20,772.89 2056801 10/20/21 20754 KOCH GENERAL ENGINEERING INC 2021-1365 10/04/21 OLYMPIC PKWY MAIN BREAK #2 FINAL WORK 2,107.04 2,107.04 2056699 09/29/21 09880 LEIGH, ROBERT RL092721 09/27/21 TUITION REIMBURSEMENT 700.00 700.00 2056700 09/29/21 20934 LIDIA GUZMAN Ref002641055 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000186233 133.00 133.00 2056701 09/29/21 20947 LOPEZ, LEO 091121 09/11/21 EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT 229.99 229.99 2056702 09/29/21 20942 MAC MARTIN Ref002641063 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000264980 15.18 15.18 2056763 10/13/21 20955 MARIA DIAZ Ref002641144 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000022156 25.29 25.29 2056703 09/29/21 20943 MARIA RIVERA Ref002641064 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000265259 58.79 58.79 2056764 10/13/21 20966 MARISOL CASTELLANOS Ref002641156 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000251603 45.61 45.61 Page 5 of 8 Check Total CHECK REGISTER Otay Water District Date Range: 9/23/2021 - 10/20/2021 Check #Date Vendor#Vendor Name Invoice Inv. Date Description Amount 21,459.00 17,678.08 3,399.01 2056764 10/13/21 20966 MARISOL CASTELLANOS Ref002641156 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000251603 45.61 45.61 2056704 09/29/21 20938 MARK LANE Ref002641059 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000251289 37.62 37.62 2056765 10/13/21 20972 MCCARTHY BUILDING COMPANIES Ref002641162 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000267015 1,646.93 1,646.93 2056705 09/29/21 20940 MICHAEL PETERS Ref002641061 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000258949 84.22 84.22 2056802 10/20/21 19824 MURRAYSMITH INC 21320101 09/24/21 PLAN CHECK SERVICES (JULY 2021)11,511.50 21320102 10/01/21 PLAN CHECK SERVICES (AUG 2021)9,947.50 2056706 09/29/21 18332 NV5 INC 228923 08/27/21 ENGINEERING DESIGN (JULY 2021)1,107.50 1,107.50 2056803 10/20/21 18332 NV5 INC 228932 08/28/21 ENGINEERING DESIGN (JULY 2021)17,088.08 234726 09/30/21 ENGINEERING DESIGN (AUG 2021)590.00 2056804 10/20/21 01002 PACIFIC PIPELINE SUPPLY INC S100430747.001 10/05/21 8" MICRO-FC FLG COUPLING 4,312.16 4,312.16 2056805 10/20/21 06527 PADRE DAM MUNICIPAL WATER 5066 10/01/21 WAS WEBSITE COSTS 69.12 69.12 2056732 10/06/21 19310 PALM LAUNDRY INC 94 10/01/21 TOWEL LAUNDRY SERVICE FY22 223.86 223.86 2056733 10/06/21 00137 PETTY CASH CUSTODIAN 100421 10/04/21 PETTY CASH REIMBURSEMENT (100421)1,980.00 100521 10/05/21 PETTY CASH REIMBURSEMENT (100521)1,419.01 2056806 10/20/21 13122 PINNACLE BUSINESS SOLUTIONS 40599 09/24/21 NETWORK EQUIPMENT 62,966.76 62,966.76 2056766 10/13/21 20974 PVCC Ref002641164 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000268746 1,893.10 1,893.10 2056767 10/13/21 20957 RAFAEL HERNANDEZ MARTINEZ Ref002641147 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000092660 14.94 14.94 2056734 10/06/21 20861 RAFTELIS 20667 09/13/21 WATER COST OF SERVICE STUDY 10,980.00 10,980.00 2056707 09/29/21 20937 REVOLVE LAUNDRY SAN DIEGO LLC Ref002641058 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000241058 198.69 198.69 2056807 10/20/21 15647 RFYEAGER ENGINEERING LLC 21172 10/01/21 CORROSION SERVICES (SEPT 2021)11,700.00 11,700.00 2056808 10/20/21 02923 RICHARD BRADY & ASSOCIATES 2108120 09/24/21 DESIGN - RANCHO JAMUL PS (AUG 2021)23,275.24 23,275.24 2056735 10/06/21 00521 RICK POST WELD & WET TAPPING 12978 09/08/21 OLYMPIC PKWY WELDING 1,860.00 1,860.00 2056768 10/13/21 04542 ROBAK, MARK 090121093021 09/30/21 MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT (SEPT 2021)9.52 9.52 2056769 10/13/21 20976 ROBYN JENKINS Ref002641166 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000273131 17.46 17.46 2056809 10/20/21 02586 SAN DIEGO COUNTY ASSESSOR 202100790 10/11/21 ASSESSOR DATA (MONTHLY)125.00 125.00 2056770 10/13/21 00003 SAN DIEGO COUNTY WATER AUTH 2204 09/14/21 SOCAL WATERSMART HEW HET WBIC 69.00 69.00 2056708 09/29/21 00121 SAN DIEGO GAS & ELECTRIC 092421 09/24/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)48,901.18 48,901.18 Page 6 of 8 Check Total CHECK REGISTER Otay Water District Date Range: 9/23/2021 - 10/20/2021 Check #Date Vendor#Vendor Name Invoice Inv. Date Description Amount 62,643.89 80,203.13 60,070.26 1,920.00 23,468.81 1,070.05 854.04 2056708 09/29/21 00121 SAN DIEGO GAS & ELECTRIC 092421 09/24/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)48,901.18 48,901.18 2056736 10/06/21 00121 SAN DIEGO GAS & ELECTRIC 100421 09/28/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)36,415.17 092721 09/27/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)26,078.29 092721A 09/27/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)150.43 2056771 10/13/21 00121 SAN DIEGO GAS & ELECTRIC 092921 09/29/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)77,969.69 093021 09/30/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)2,233.44 2056810 10/20/21 00121 SAN DIEGO GAS & ELECTRIC 100621 10/06/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)22,850.01 101121 10/11/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)18,346.12 101221 10/12/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)14,576.91 101121A 10/11/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)4,181.98 101121C 10/11/21 UTILITY EXPENSES (MONTHLY)115.24 2056811 10/20/21 19603 SECURITAS SECURITY SVC USA INC W6981315 05/31/21 ON-DEMAND SECURITY RESPONSE 820.00 W6992351 08/31/21 ON-DEMAND SECURITY RESPONSE 410.00 W6984917 06/30/21 ON-DEMAND SECURITY RESPONSE 345.00 W6990046 07/31/21 ON-DEMAND SECURITY RESPONSE 345.00 2056737 10/06/21 20411 STC TRAFFIC INC 4840 09/10/21 TRAFFIC ENGINEERING SERVICES (JULY 2021)1,220.00 1,220.00 2056812 10/20/21 20411 STC TRAFFIC INC 4881R 10/04/21 TRAFFIC ENGINEERING SERVICES (AUG 2021)4,320.00 4,320.00 2056709 09/29/21 20933 STEVE HORN Ref002641053 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000141606 26.99 26.99 2056772 10/13/21 20971 STUART CASWELL Ref002641161 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000266384 8.47 8.47 2056813 10/20/21 10339 SUPREME OIL COMPANY 406658 09/28/21 UNLEADED FUEL & DIESEL 14,128.18 406798 09/28/21 UNLEADED FUEL & DIESEL 9,340.63 2056814 10/20/21 17704 T&T JANITORIAL INC 2018-7104 09/30/21 JANITORIAL SERVICES 5,330.00 5,330.00 2056683 09/29/21 20898 TERESA BORQUEZ Ref002641054 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000184202 145.50 145.50 2056738 10/06/21 03236 THE CENTRE FOR ORGANIZATION TCFOE3608 09/16/21 MANAGEMENT TRAINING 399.00 399.00 2056815 10/20/21 00427 UNDERGROUND SERVICE ALERT 920210505 10/01/21 UNDERGROUND ALERTS (MONTHLY)646.90 dsb20204977 10/01/21 DIG SAFE BOARD FEES (MONTHLY)423.15 2056739 10/06/21 15675 UNITED SITE SERVICES INC 114-12425981 09/23/21 PORT. TOILET RENTAL 576.40 114-12425813 09/23/21 PORT. TOILET RENTAL 150.00 114-12425806 09/23/21 PORT. TOILET RENTAL 127.64 2056710 09/29/21 20945 VERONICA LEONARDO JOHNSON Ref002641066 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000265746 54.75 54.75 Page 7 of 8 Check Total CHECK REGISTER Otay Water District Date Range: 9/23/2021 - 10/20/2021 Check #Date Vendor#Vendor Name Invoice Inv. Date Description Amount 1,705.60 7,672.00 625.00 375.00 2056710 09/29/21 20945 VERONICA LEONARDO JOHNSON Ref002641066 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000265746 54.75 54.75 2056711 09/29/21 20909 VOLT WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS 44608534 09/12/21 WATER INTERNS (9/6/21-9/12/21)746.20 746.20 2056740 10/06/21 20909 VOLT WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS 44623345 09/19/21 WATER INTERNS (9/13/21-9/19/21)852.80 852.80 2056773 10/13/21 20909 VOLT WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS 44654177 10/03/21 WATER INTERNS (9/27/21-10/3/21)852.80 44639028 09/26/21 WATER INTERNS (9/20/21-9/26/21)852.80 2056816 10/20/21 15807 WATCHLIGHT CORPORATION 735840 10/15/21 SECURITY ALARM MONITORING FY22 2,576.92 2,576.92 2056817 10/20/21 14879 WATER CONSERVATION GARDEN JPA 9527 10/01/21 GARDEN FUNDING CONTRIBUTION 18,622.00 18,622.00 2056818 10/20/21 15726 WATER SYSTEMS CONSULTING INC 6039 09/30/21 HYDRAULIC MODELING (SEPT 2021)7,311.25 7,311.25 2056819 10/20/21 14620 WATER SYSTEMS OPTIMIZATION INC 2046 09/24/21 WATER AUDIT SERVICES FY21-FY23 2,000.00 2,000.00 2056741 10/06/21 20739 WATERTALENT LLC 2774 09/13/21 TEMPORARY EMPLOYEE SERVICES FY22 3,288.00 2789 09/20/21 TEMPORARY EMPLOYEE SERVICES FY22 3,288.00 2760 09/07/21 TEMPORARY EMPLOYEE SERVICES FY22 1,096.00 2056820 10/20/21 20739 WATERTALENT LLC 2802 09/27/21 TEMPORARY EMPLOYEE SERVICES FY22 3,288.00 3,288.00 2056742 10/06/21 01343 WE GOT YA PEST CONTROL INC 46824 09/09/21 AS-NEEDED BEE REMOVAL 500.00 46841 09/13/21 AS-NEEDED BEE REMOVAL 125.00 2056821 10/20/21 01343 WE GOT YA PEST CONTROL INC 46961 09/22/21 AS-NEEDED BEE REMOVAL 250.00 46952 09/22/21 AS-NEEDED BEE REMOVAL 125.00 2056774 10/13/21 20965 WEST COAST GENERAL CORP Ref002641155 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000241429 1,745.22 1,745.22 2056712 09/29/21 20003 WESTERN AUDIO VISUAL 15598 09/03/21 OUTSIDE SERVICES 2,499.55 2,499.55 2056713 09/29/21 20931 WILLIAM KOENIG Ref002641051 09/27/21 UB Refund Cst #0000001635 88.75 88.75 2056775 10/13/21 20961 WILLIAM VIGNA Ref002641151 10/08/21 UB Refund Cst #0000224468 35.63 35.63 Amount Pd Total:1,815,749.00 Check Grand Total:1,815,749.00 Page 8 of 8